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Illustration on Kim Jong-un's diplomatic wish list by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What Kim Jong-un really wants

If one were to make a list of “what Kim really wants” in his discussions with the U.S., such would be quite straightforward, however — at least so far — they have not been expressed as such.

Illustration on Nafta by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The need for NAFTA

Finally some good news for the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). CNBC is reporting and my White House sources confirm that there may be the framework for a renewed and improved NAFTA in the weeks ahead.

Illustration on fiscal responsibility and spending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Budget blame where it belongs

While tax cuts take the budget blame, spending does the debt damage. Proponents of big government spending are happy to stoke the latest story in the narrative that America is under-taxed.

Barbara Bush Photo Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Barbara Bush, one of a kind

A beautiful person, no other way to say it. Barbara Bush was one of a kind, pushing through challenges most lives never see, with a hallmark smile, clear eyes and unwavering faith.

House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway, R-Texas, joined at left by Vice Chairman Glenn Thompson, R-Pa., announces the new farm bill, officially known as the 2018 Agriculture and Nutrition Act, at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 12, 2018. The bulk of the bill's spending goes toward funding SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Faith leaders skew Bible to oppose SNAP reform

- The Washington Times

Faith leaders are coming out in full force to oppose the Republican-sponsored Farm Bill released in the House that imposes stricter work requirements on those receiving food stamps. Do not be fooled by their so-called Christian arguments in opposition of this bill. Their arguments are neither Christian nor common sense.

The Birth of a New Economic Recovery Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The optimists may be right

In January, Wall Street investors were optimistic tax cuts would sustain economic growth and the Trump bull market. As spring arrives, the world has proven decidedly more uncertain.

Illustration on the costs of Elon Musk's Space X by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The crony capitalist in free market clothing

You might imagine that pro-capitalism, free-market folk like me would just love what Elon Musk has done in the past couple of decades but you’d be wrong. I enjoy his entrepreneurial spirit and success, founding company (zip2) after company (PayPal) after company (The Boring Co.) and turning them into properties worth billions and then moving along to the next new thing. Props and kudos to this son of South Africa and prototype for “Iron Man.” You got those parts right.

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Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich introduces Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a campaign rally in Fort Myers, Fla., on Sept. 19, 2016. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Gingrich goes there -- compares FBI's raid of Cohen to Nazis

- The Washington Times

Newt Gingrich, former speaker of the House, ripped into the FBI for its raid on President Donald Trump's personal attorney, Michael Cohen, comparing the federal action to the Nazi regime. And insofar as the rather ridiculous raids on Cohen's files go -- he's got a bit of a point. These are moves that ring more of Gestapo, less of constitutional America -- more of police state, less of republic, land of the law.

Former FBI Director James Comey smiles during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Thursday, June 8, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Lanny Davis: I would've advised President Hillary to fire Comey

- The Washington Times

President Trump's dismissal of James Comey (based on the recommendation of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein) caused a firestorm in Washington and eventually triggered the naming appointment of Robert Mueller as Special Counsel to investigate allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russians to meddle in the 2016 election. But, according to a close Hillary Clinton confidante, had she won the election, she would have possibly fired Comey as well... and for the exact same reason.

Civil liberties lawyer and prominent liberal Alan Dershowitz on Monday blasted the left for its continued speculation about President Trump's mental stability. (Fox News)

Searching and seizing

'The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." — Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

Swamp Cannon Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The real threat to Trump

In the midst of worrying about North Korea, Syria and Democrats taking control of the House of Representatives this fall, President Donald Trump is now worrying about a government assault on his own business, which targeted his own lawyer.

Why Trump should stand by his tariffs

There will not be a trade war, if President Trump stands by his principles on the tariffs. Because Mr. Trump has already made America great again. And our trade adversaries and cheaters need us more than we need them.

Robert Mueller at the crossroads

Robert Mueller was appointed special counsel in May 2017 in reaction to a media still gripped by near hysteria over the inexplicable defeat of Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election.

Steering clear of climate alarm

Sunday, April 22 will mark the 48th anniversary of Earth Day. A lot of concern about the planet's future was generated back then and a passionate movement was launched that endures to this day.

Tax Day Harvest Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

For many, Tax Day will be a bit less gloomy

Federal income tax returns for 2017 must be postmarked or submitted electronically to the IRS by midnight April 17 this year — two days later than usual.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., announces to reporters he will not run for re-election and will retire next year at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The speaker exits

"Nice guys finish last" is part of the lore of baseball, an insight by Hall of Fame player and manager Leo Durocher, but it could be the epitaph for the Washington career of Paul Ryan, the speaker of the House who is widely praised for civility and good manners. He announced Wednesday that he's fed up and going home.

Soldiers can be atheists, too

Atheism is a non-belief in a god, while humanism is an ethical view ("Navy rejects 'non-theist' for chaplain corps; lawmakers warn against changing core mission," Web, March 27). Being a humanist chaplain would not mean, as some seem to believe, jumping at the chance to tell soldiers who believe in a deity that one does not exist.

Recognize Israel's right to Golan

As President Trump weighs a response to the latest deadly Syrian chemical-weapons attack on civilians, he should consider formally recognizing Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights ("Trump unleashes anger on 'Animal' Assad over apparent chemical attack in Syria," Web, April 8).

A president with failings of his own making

In terms of formal education and academic background, Woodrow Wilson ranks high -- perhaps at the top -- of any list of intellectual American presidents.