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Building the Deal with South Korea Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Building the deal with North Korea

The first pundit responses to President Donald Trump’s agreement with Kim Jong-un for the denuclearization of North Korea have leaned heavily on a series of inept comparisons with President Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran. The differences are as stark as they are important.

Illustration on the Pentagon's data cloud decision by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the Pentagon clouds its future

Before D-Day, Gen. George Patton commanded an army that didn’t exist. His First U.S. Army Group was supposedly training around East Anglia. It featured phony tanks so German spy planes could report on them. It kept up a steady stream of radio traffic so German spies could track the movements of troops. And it featured divisions that seemed to be preparing to invade Calais.

FILE - In this file  July 7, 2016, photo then-FBI Director James Comey testifies before the House Oversight Committee to discuss Hillary Clinton's email investigation, at the Capitol in Washington. The Justice Department's watchdog faults former Comey for breaking with protocol in his handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation. But it says his decisions were not driven by political bias ahead of the 2016 election.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Former FBI Director James Comey delivered 3 blows that put the bureau down but not out

Current and former agents of the once most respected name in law enforcement must cringe in helpless disbelief every time a news headline crosses their computer containing the letters “FBI.” “What is it this time?” They must think to themselves as they discover another verbal lashing by pundits and politicians in the furtherance of the day’s agenda, but under the guise of patriotism and truth. Since when did the men and women of the FBI become a weapon of war in politics? What did they do to deserve this?

Illustration on U.S./ROK military exercizes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Korean war games in the balance

I arrived in Seoul on the same day as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo after the Singapore summit. In the wake of the meeting between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, Mr. Pompeo and I had essentially the same task: Reassuring our allies.

Illustration on the I.G. report on the DOJ by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Outrage over bias at the FBI

The much-anticipated report of the Justice Department inspector general (IG) has satisfied neither Republicans nor Democrats. If you expected that the IG report would settle the endless debate about double standards (favoring either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump), that it would identify malefactors and punish the guilty, then you were sorely disappointed. Instead, Inspector General Michael Horowitz investigated heavily, labored mightily and produced a wrist-breaking tome that history will find wanting.

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Middle East Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Reshaping the alliances of the untrustworthy

Syria has become the "sick man" of the Middle East, a territory laden with death and homelessness. In 2014 erstwhile President Barack Obama invited the Russians into the region to control the use of poison gas by their surrogate Bashar Assad. In 2015, as the Russians intervention expanded Mr. Obama said this "is just going to get them stuck in a quagmire." Sen. John McCain responded on the Senate floor that the policy of the Obama administration "replaced the risk of action with the perils of inaction."

'What's in a label?'

Perhaps "What's in a label?" would be an appropriate question to ask of a modern day Romeo and Juliet. Today's grocery aisles are so covered by labels warning that soda is dangerous and barbecues will give you cancer, that any star-crossed couple is right to be confused about their real risk.

Wallace belongs at MSNBC

"MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace says GOP left her: 'This Republican Party is unrecognizable to me'" (Web, June 10) takes us back 10 years to when Ms. Wallace was a communications aide on Sen. John McCain's 2008 presidential campaign. The vitriol she now spews about President Trump is like the hostility she showed to Mr. McCain's running mate, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin.

A man watches a TV screen showing file footage of U.S. President Donald Trump, right, and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, June 11, 2018.  Final preparations are underway in Singapore for Tuesday's historic summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim, including a plan for the leaders to kick things off by meeting with only their translators present, a U.S. official said.  The signs read: " Summit between the United States and North Korea." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

The threat of peace

The happy talk coming out of Singapore will mislead the rest of the world, which hankers for something, anything, that can eliminate the nuclear sword hanging over everybody. "Jaw, jaw," in Winston Churchill's famous formulation, is better than "war, war," but happy talk, whether by Donald Trump or Kim Jong-un, can be dangerous for the unwary.

Krauthammer leaves too soon

It was with sadness that I read the announcement by Charles Krauthammer of his imminent death ("Krauthammer a classic, classy neoconservative intellectual — whether you agreed with him or not," Web, June 10). He is a man of conscience and a fighter for what he considers to be a worthy cause. With devastating logic, he has demolished the views of his opponents concerning both national and international affairs.

The tension between healing and justice

The question of why communities across the country should continue to honor the man who 157 years ago took command of the Army battling U.S. troops has been a roiling debate for some years -- intensified since the out-of-control protests in Charlottesville last summer over steps to remove the city's monument to Robert E. Lee.

Elephant Stabbed Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Deconstructing young minds

Since November 2016, the deep state and its media allies have spent considerable time and money cultivating animus toward President Trump and the Republican-led Congress among younger voters.

Illustration on the ascendancy of al-Sadr by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

An Iraqi threat goes mainstream

Iraqi Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's rise to power has not yet reached its zenith. The May 18 Iraqi parliamentary election, in which his Sairun political block won a plurality, has elevated him to the position of de facto leader of the Iraqi nation. Mr. al-Sadr won't become prime minister because he didn't run for a parliamentary seat, but he will control the formation of the next Iraqi government.

International Space Station Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Preserving America's supremacy in space

Acquiescing to efforts to end government funding of the International Space Station (ISS) by 2025 would be a historic and costly mistake to the tune of billions, destroying an engineering, science and geopolitical marvel and elevating America's enemies to supremacy in space.

Chart to accompany Moore article of June 11, 2018.

Trump's economic boom

The left is quickly running out of excuses for why President Trump's economic policies have caused a boom — rather than the bust they predicted with such great certainty.

Illustration on "gay Christianity" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wolves in shepherd's clothing

A bit of news you may have missed over the past couple weeks was that of about 2,000 high-profile Christian pastors and church elders who, on May 24, marched on the White House.

President Donald Trump arrives at Paya Lebar Air Base for a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, Sunday, June 10, 2018, in Singapore. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

A crossroads at the summit

No politician owns the exclusive rights to "hope and change." As a campaign slogan, it worked well for a moment for Barack Obama, but in hindsight it was little more than an attractive but empty phrase. He wowed the world by signing the Iran Nuclear Deal, but left the terror-friendly regime in Tehran on course to complete a doomsday arsenal. President Trump, girding himself for a nuclear summit with North Korea, promises to deal only in the hard currency of reality.

Zero tolerance for filth

It is truly a national disgrace when tastelessness and moral depravity can pass for humor and the overriding residual focus is only on the reaction and response by two television networks.