Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on high tech's deleterious effects on commerce by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Big Tech chameleon

Twenty years ago, no one had heard of either Facebook or Google, neither of which existed yet. For that matter, no one knew much about social media or search engines in general.

"I'm not a racist. I'm the least racist person you will ever interview," said President Trump told reporters as he met with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, California Republican (left). The furor grew out of an immigration discussion at the White House on Thursday where Mr. Trump allegedly made vulgar comments. (Associated Press)

‘Trump’s a racist’ — Marcia, Marcia, Marcia

- The Washington Times

There comes a point when calling a spade a spatula becomes a bit worn and wearying and the public starts to catch on and actually notice and say, hey, that’s a spatula, not a spade. In other words: People start to doubt the message is actually true.

Taxpayer Money Lost in  Space Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The hidden fees of SpaceX

No one likes hidden fees. From unauthorized phone charges to home closing costs and prepaid card levies, they take a toll on low and middle-income Americans. To mitigate consumer outrage, members of Congress often demagogue unknown expenditures like ATM and airline baggage fees in committee hearings; costs which usually do not amount to more than a few dollars.

Uncle Sam Watching You Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The undoing of limited government

Late last week, Rep. Devin Nunes, California Republican, chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, repeated his public observations that members of the intelligence community — particularly the CIA, the NSA and the intelligence division of the FBI — are not trustworthy with the nation’s intelligence secrets. Because he has a security clearance at the “top secret” level and knows how others who have access to secrets have used and abused them, his allegations are extraordinary.

Illustration on China's dam building frenzy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China’s dam frenzy

China’s hyperactive dam building is a reminder that, while international attention remains on its recidivist activities in the South China Sea’s disputed waters, it is also focusing quietly on other waters — of rivers that originate in Chinese-controlled territory like Tibet and flow to other countries. No country in history has built more dams than China. In fact, China today boasts more dams than the rest of the world combined.

Illustration on lowering veterans' suicide rates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lowering the suicide rates of those who serve

President Donald Trump last week signed an executive order which seeks to lower suicides rates among our nation’s veterans. The order, which would take effect in March, expands mental health services for transitioning veterans upon their return home to civilian life. Mr. Trump hailed the order as a “historic step to make sure that our incredible veterans are taken care of in a proper manner.”

FISA: A Rubber Stamp to Break the Law Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Institutionalizing Watergate

The “third rate burglary” of the Democratic National Committee’s offices at the Watergate hotel in 1972 was meant to spy on the Democratic presidential campaign. Now we’re beginning to understand how a Democratic administration pried into the 2016 Republican Campaign with the assistance of the CIA, the FBI, and the Department of Justice. The Democratic Party’s media wing tries to cover the spying and pretends that it uncovered dirt.

A supporter of President Donald Trump challenges police officers and a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program during a rally outside the office of California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

Nightmare for Dreamers

DACA, “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals,” is an Obama pen-and-phone program, not one created by legislation. It was simply a policy announced by President Obama on June 15, 2013. The date was chosen because it was the 30th anniversary of Plyler v. Doe, a Supreme Court decision that barred public schools from charging illegal immigrant children tuition.

A pair of postal workers shovel the lot at the Plainville, Mass., Post Office Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018. The post office was open for business as usual.  (Mark Stockwell/The Sun Chronicle via AP)

Another view of the U.S. Postal Service

Along with political coverage and analysis generally regarded as top-flight, The Washington Times apparently also possesses a good sense of humor.

Sen. Charles E. Schumer. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Democrats decree death in the swamp for the Dreamers

- The Washington Times

Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi and their Democratic followers laid a careful trap for their Republican tormentors, and then fell in it. The Republican leadership can keep them from climbing out if they’re smart and show a little courage.

Related Articles

Meryl Streep, left, and Ai-jen Poo arrive at the 75th annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Golden Globes: Another round of 'Hollywood fakery'

Most people did not watch the Golden Globes, one of the many parties in which the entertainment industry pats itself on the back and gives its friends awards. But, to paraphrase a few on Twitter, it was at least nice for Hollywood take a break from raping each other for at least one evening.

Trump should bring up Beirut now

Iranian protests give President Donald Trump a chance to address with the ayatollahs the great casualties inflicted in Beirut in 1983 against Americans and the French. From Aug. 25, 1982, to Feb. 26, 1984, U.S. Marines served in Lebanon under the most difficult rules of engagement, restrictions on fire support and political posturing. On Aug. 25, 1982, about 800 Marines of the 32d Marine Amphibious Unit (MAU) landed in Beirut as part of a multinational peacekeeping force and oversaw the evacuation of PLO guerrillas under Israeli siege. The force included 400 French and 800 Italian soldiers. On Sept. 10 of that year, after the evacuation of the PLO was complete, 32d MAU was withdrawn. Then, in the wake of the assassination of President-elect Bashir Gemayel, the 32d MAU returned to Beirut and remained until Oct. 30, when it was relieved by the 24th MAU.

Climate scientists blowing hot air

Why do we keep listening to so-called "experts" who continue to change their story on climate change? As an engineer, I have found that if a set of data does not create to the results we observe, then there is a problem with the method of evaluation. The climate scientists have many years of data that they have used to predict climate-change results that have not been anywhere close to what has actually occurred.

Draining the national security swamp

One year into President Trump's tenure, anti-Trump political bias in the FBI and Department of Justice is now so obvious that objective observers should fear for the future of our constitutional republic from the "deep state."

Stopping an outrageous land grab

The Mississippi gopher frog (or the "dusky gopher frog" in official federal parlance) may soon get his 15 minutes of fame, but the frog deserves better than being a pawn in a case that pits an overreaching government agency against property owners.

Book jacket: "Supreme Injustice: Slavery in the Nation's Highest Court"

Grappling with unsettling truths about slavery

Only by ignoring the pervasive presence of slavery in 18th century America is there a cohesive founding narrative for the United States as a bulwark against tyranny and a place where government is based on the concept that "all men are created equal."

Illustration on auditing the Pentagon by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why a Pentagon audit is overdue

At the beginning December 2017, the comptroller of the Department of Defense (DoD) David Norquist announced that DoD would conduct its first ever audit.

Illustration on protectionism from Whirlpool by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trade and South Korea

For the second time in a month the International Trade Commission (ITC) has invoked a rarely used provision of the 1974 International Trade Act to protect a U.S.-based company from "unfair" competition from foreign suppliers -- in this case South Korean producers of large residential washing machines or LRWs.

Illustration on bulletproof windshield for Philadelphia police cruisers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Protecting 'blue lives'

The good news is that Philadelphia police officers will soon be patrolling the city's mean streets in 150 new patrol cars that have been equipped with bulletproof windows.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with lawmakers on immigration policy, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in Washington. From left, Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., Trump, Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump's new TV show -- genius at work

- The Washington Times

A Trump charm and, yes, intelligence lit up television screens all over America on Tuesday afternoon. Freed from the restraints and cautions of Bannonism, the president suddenly seems to soar like an eagle.

How 99 percent of 'Palestine refugees' are fake

In the words of a veteran Washington hand, the problem of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), the main U.N. agency dealing with Palestinians, is always important but never urgent. Well, it just became urgent.

Europe's silence

It's tempting to say that Europe's leaders lack the courage of their convictions. But that would imply that they have convictions. The evidence suggests those days are gone.

Pope Francis delivers his speech to diplomats accredited to the Holy See, during an audience for the traditional exchange of New Year greetings, in the Regia Hall at the Vatican, Monday, Jan. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini, Pool)

Pope Francis admits: Not all migrants good, not all border limits bad

- The Washington Times

Pope Francis made a somewhat eyebrow-raising remark the other day -- eyebrow-raising because it's such a 180 from his normal progressive talk -- and it's one that went like this: Not all migrants are in the migrant move for the job opportunities. They're not all honorable in intent. Some, he said, may have less than praiseworthy intentions.