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The Shutdown Schumer T-shirt Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

But it’s not the ‘Trump shutdown’

- The Washington Times

Even with the shutdown averted, Democrats continue to act as if they believe that no matter what they do, Republicans will get the blame, but reality is beginning to undermine their narrative.

Barack Obama     Associated Press photo

Another day at work, another congressional tantrum

- The Washington Times

Throwing tantrums and shutting down the government is a bipartisan sport. Both Republicans and Democrats have now thrown this particular tantrum, like children fighting over a toy, and it’s great fun only for the tantrum-throwers. The rest of us, and that includes both Democrats and Republicans, are not much amused.

Illustration on the need to reform Federal welfare programs by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why welfare needs reform

With Congress back in session, what’s one of the more controversial items potentially on 2018’s legislative docket? Speaker of the House Paul Ryan says welfare reform is in the cards.

A 100 percent U.S. Angus beef Colby Jack Cheeseburger as part of U.S. President Donald Trump set is seen at Munch's Burger Shack restaurant in Tokyo Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017. The cheeseburger Trump had during his recent visit to Japan is still drawing lines at the Tokyo burger joint. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

The ‘plant-based burger’ scam

Animal activist groups are making obvious headway convincing meat eaters to put down the steak, according to a GlobalData analysis that estimates as many as 6 percent of U.S. consumers currently consider themselves vegans.

In this Feb. 1, 2017, file photo, Brooklyn College students walk between classes on campus in New York. The New York state Legislature approved a budget on April 9, 2017, that includes funding for Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo's plan to offer free tuition for middle-class students at state universities. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Taming the tuition tiger

You can’t put a price on education, the saying goes, but if you did, it would be very high. And the cost falls on everyone.

FILE - In this April 11, 2017 file photo, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, center, signs a bill between Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, left, and House Speaker Michael Busch during a bill signing ceremony following the state's legislative session at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Md.  Lawmakers are poised to act early in the upcoming legislative session on two high-profile issues: paid sick leave and medical marijuana. The General Assembly gathers Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018.   Democrats, who control the assembly, are expected to make a priority of overriding Hogan's veto of paid sick leave for businesses with 15 or more employees.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

A New Year’s present for Marylanders

Most Marylanders agree that Maryland income taxes are too high. In various rankings we almost always fall into the category of the 10 worst states. For example The Tax Foundation ranks Maryland 9th highest in individual income taxes per capita; and the 2018 business tax climate index ranks Maryland among the 10 worst of the 50 states.

For several years, the resurgent oil and gas sector was almost the sole truly bright spot of the economy. (Associated Press/File)

Free markets and free trade will fuel U.S. energy dominance

To further capitalize on America’s energy renaissance, the Trump administration should reconsider and look to strengthen free trade — particularly with Canada and Mexico, our two largest energy trading partners.

Illustration on merit-based immigration policy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s merit-based immigration system

For decades, the American people have been begging and pleading with our elected officials for an immigration system that is lawful and that serves our national interest.

Tax Cut Balloons Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Lasting and transformative tax relief

A staggering 13 billion dollars. More than the value of the entire “Star Wars” franchise. That’s the minimum amount taxpayers will save under the recently-passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act now that lawmakers have made compliance with the U.S. tax code less of a chore. Taxpayers will now also save an estimated 210 million hours of time they used to squander on the clumsy 1040 “long form.” Lighter paperwork burdens like these will begin showing up in other portions of the tax code for businesses and individuals as the new law is implemented.

Chart to accompany Moore article of Jan. 22, 2018.

The Democrats’ fiscal trap

With all the talk about a possible government shutdown due to an impasse on immigration reform, no one seems to be paying attention to a story of even bigger long-term consequence. Congress is preparing a two-year budget that blows past bipartisan spending caps to the tune of $216 billion through 2019. These are the latest stunning tallies from an analysis by Congressional Quarterly. (See chart).

Former President Richard Nixon. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

An Olympian break in the war between the words

- The Washington Times

A few Ping-Pong balls broke the Cold War ice around China a generation ago, following Richard Nixon’s stunning trip to Beijing (when it was still called Peiping), and soon the United States and China were on their way to normal diplomatic relations.

Illustration on the recent nuclear alarm in Hawaii by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Hawaii error and liberal hysteria

Murphy’s Law was written to describe how governments work. It was proved yet again on January 13 when an employee of the Hawaii Emergency Management System sent a cellphone alert that said, “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” The alert was false but until it was corrected almost 40 minutes later it terrified millions of residents and tourists.

Illustration on protecting aborted babies delivered alive by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Giving the smallest patients equal protection under the law

Doctors today routinely diagnose and treat a myriad of conditions, illnesses and diseases suffered by society’s littlest patients — unborn babies and newborns — significantly enhancing both their health and longevity.

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President Donald Trump pauses during a prison reform roundtable in the Roosevelt Room of the Washington, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Trump haters have their next distraction

- The Washington Times

Democrats this morning are on a mass tantrum, taking to the media to outdo themselves with the best shock and awe impression they can muster over President Donald Trump's "sh--hole" comment -- the same comment Trump now denies, via Twitter, saying. Thing is: Democrats really don't care what Trump said. They only care about how they can use what they said to attack him politically.

Luis Gutierrez, go home

- The Washington Times

Rep. Luis Gutierrez took to national television to call out President Donald Trump as a neo-Nazi and KKK leader. Gutierrez should go home. And not to the cushy, cozy home of his fellow anti-American elites in Illinois, but rather to Puerto Rico, his home of descent, the home he oh-so-proudly hails from while making political points against conservatives -- the home he mentally channels while dinging the president as a racist and a bigot and an enemy of the poor.

In this Jan. 9, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with lawmakers on immigration policy in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. Trump used profane language Thursday, Jan. 11, as he questioned why the U.S. should permit immigrants from certain countries, according to three people briefed on the conversation. The White House did not deny the comment. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump's 'sh--hole' remark reason he was elected

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump reportedly suggested the United States shouldn't take in immigrants from Haiti or other "s---hole countries" because they do little to bolster an America First agenda -- and now the world is on fire, tittering about racism and vulgarities and the foul-mouthed impoliteness of this White House commander-in-chief. But really folks, this is why Trump was elected in the first place.

Beijing must stop flights now

At a time when the two Koreas are seeking to defuse tension through talks, Beijing's unilateral launch last week of controversial aviation routes constituted a provocation undermining regional security. On Jan. 4, China launched the northbound M503 flight route along with three east-west extension routes — without prior negotiations with Taiwan. We solemnly protest this reckless behavior, which raises concerns over cross-Strait stability and regional aviation safety.

DACA good for politicians, not Trump

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) executive order isn't good for working-class America. It's a matter of simple supply and demand: More people available for jobs means lower wages and benefits for all. So why are politicians from both parties trying to jam it down our throats?

Barry Goldwater campaigning in 1964. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The sorehead losers of 2016 suggest a familiar solution

- The Washington Times

President Trump goes in for his annual physical Friday, and the doctors will only look at things like his blood pressure, listen to his heart, bang on his knees with a little rubber mallet and turn him around for the ever-popular prostate exam.

Illustration Wind Power by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

A blow for energy security

The Trump administration took a blow this week from its own Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which ruled against further subsidies to financially ailing coal and nuclear plants. The blow was deserved.

In this June 5, 2017, photo, a worker stacks merchandise outside a Walmart in Salem, N.H. Walmart is boosting its starting salary for U.S. workers to $11 an hour, giving a one-time $1,000 cash bonus to eligible employees and expanding its maternity and parental leave benefits. The retailer said Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, changes to its compensation and benefits policy will impact more than a million hourly workers in the U.S., with the wage increase effective next month. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

Tax cuts hit home

"Don't cut corporate taxes," they said. "The riches will only be used for share buybacks and executive perks," they said. "The workers won't actually benefit," they said. It's already looking like "they" didn't know what they were talking about.

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence sgreets troops in a hangar at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan on Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017. Mandel Ngan/Pool via AP) **FILE**

Looking for help on the Afghanistan problem

The West cannot solve the problem of Afghanistan alone. The U.S. and its European allies can treat the symptoms, but they can only stave off the absolute disaster for a period of time, at the cost of much blood and treasure.

Book jacket: "Munich" by Robert Harris

A controversial agreement and the limits of its fiction

"Munich," Robert Harris' latest novel, describes the cobbling together of the 1938 Munich Agreement, by which Britain and France let Germany take over the Sudatenland region of Czechoslovakia in return for assurances of peace.

Illustration on the effects of Korean economic policy on international relations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why domestic politics matter globally

In a scenario few thought we would see again, we find ourselves anxiously observing a world leader with little more, but no less than, a catastrophically destructive military capability to threaten our allies near and far.

Illustration on the need for a strategic approach to Iran by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why U.S. policy toward Iran must focus on strategy

President Obama's abandonment of Iranians on the streets of Tehran in 2009 was not some random tactical mistake; it was strategic policy that sacrificed democracy in Iran in order to establish an economic and political partnership with the regime, eventually the Iran deal.