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Mike Pompeo    Associated Press photo

The Democratic terror of a miracle in North Korea

- The Washington Times

Trying to spark a new romance, or even arrange a weekend tryst, is not always easy. It’s impossible with the help of spectators eager to throw things, not orange blossoms but sticks and stones with sharp edges. But that’s how Washington tries to conduct diplomacy, circa 2018.

Illustration on Taiwan's contributions to world health by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Taiwan must be seated at the World Health Assembly

The constitution of the World Health Organization (WHO) notes that “the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition.” Yet WHO withheld, as last year, an invitation for Taiwan’s participation in May as an observer in the annual World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva, Switzerland.

House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway, R-Texas, joined at left by Vice Chairman Glenn Thompson, R-Pa., announces the new farm bill, officially known as the 2018 Agriculture and Nutrition Act, at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 12, 2018. The bulk of the bill's spending goes toward funding SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Faith leaders skew Bible to oppose SNAP reform

- The Washington Times

Faith leaders are coming out in full force to oppose the Republican-sponsored Farm Bill released in the House that imposes stricter work requirements on those receiving food stamps. Do not be fooled by their so-called Christian arguments in opposition of this bill. Their arguments are neither Christian nor common sense.

The Birth of a New Economic Recovery Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The optimists may be right

In January, Wall Street investors were optimistic tax cuts would sustain economic growth and the Trump bull market. As spring arrives, the world has proven decidedly more uncertain.

Illustration on the costs of Elon Musk's Space X by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The crony capitalist in free market clothing

You might imagine that pro-capitalism, free-market folk like me would just love what Elon Musk has done in the past couple of decades but you’d be wrong. I enjoy his entrepreneurial spirit and success, founding company (zip2) after company (PayPal) after company (The Boring Co.) and turning them into properties worth billions and then moving along to the next new thing. Props and kudos to this son of South Africa and prototype for “Iron Man.” You got those parts right.

William Wachtel holds up a mock Social Security card of President-elect Donald Trump as he speaks to members of the media following a meeting with Trump at Trump Tower in New York, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A fresh start for a beleaguered agency

It seemed like it would never happen. But after more than five years, a formal nomination of a Social Security commissioner will finally be considered by the U.S. Senate. This is a long overdue development. The delay of a nomination, however, pales compared to the wait a million Americans continue to endure for a hearing that will decide if they will receive the Social Security disability benefits they earned while working.

President Donald Trump gestures during a news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump's private Mar-a-Lago club, Wednesday, April 18, 2018, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump and the attorney-client privilege

A few weeks ago, President Trump was an outwardly happy man because of the utterance of one solitary word from the lips of special counsel Robert Mueller to one of Mr. Trump’s lawyers. The word that thrilled the president and his legal team was “subject.”

The Tarmac Meeting Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Clintons and the rule of law

Former Obama Attorney General Loretta Lynch, in a NBC interview last Monday, reopened a can of worms. In the interview, Ms. Lynch defended her private meeting with Bill Clinton back on June 27, 2016.

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In this March 20, 2018, file photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin pauses as he speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Will Paul Ryan challenge Trump in 2020?

- The Washington Times

Never Trump Republicans and establishments types in Washington have been pining for a White Knight to sweep in after the expected mid-term defeats this November to challenge Trump for the 2020 nomination. And Ryan appears to come right from central casting to play the part.

Special counsel Robert Mueller is mandated to submit a confidential report to the attorney general at the conclusion of his investigation, but there are major ambiguities about whether a full release of the information would be in the public interest. (Associated Press/File)

Trump almost fired Mueller over fake news report

- The Washington Times

The initial reports of the financial investigation turned out to be erroneous. They were fake. They were fake news. Bloomberg, Reuters and the Wall Street Journal all ran with the story until finally issuing a correction and update. But, as is usually the case, the damage was done as cable news stations ran with the report with non-stop breathless coverage and analysis.

U.S. Rep. Lou Correa is defending a student painting hanging in his office that depicts the Statue of Liberty wearing a hijab, despite allegations that it violates the separation of church and state. (YouTube/@We The People Rising)

DC area hate crime hoax: Teen girl claimed man ripped off head scarf

- The Washington Times

The incident is yet another hoax that gained intense media attention when first reported but then disappears into the ether when the facts finally come to light. The multiple reports of so-called hate crimes against Latinos and Muslims miraculously appeared after the 2016 presidential election and the media breathlessly reported on each instance in an effort to describe a larger trend of hate in America inspired by Donald Trump.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Mark Zuckerberg, Robert Mueller's right-hand man

- The Washington Times

Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook, told members of the joint Senate meeting of the committees of Commerce, Science and Transportation and of Judiciary that yes, he is helping Robert Mueller with his special counsel business. Does anyone else find this a bit unsettling?

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, Iowa Republican (left) and Commerce Committee Chairman John Thune, South Dakota Republican, speak with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg after a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Tuesday about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (Associated Press)

Facebook's Big Dork vs. Congress' Dearth Panels

- The Washington Times

Every single one of these people in Congress expressing shock and condemnation over Facebook's sale of persuasion power to political entities already knew exactly what Facebook has been up to for years. Because each and every one of them has used those very tactics to get elected.

Illustration on Syria's role in middle-east peace by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What's at stake in Syria

Syria is a far-away land about which we know little. But we do know this: Over the past seven years, more than a half million people have been slaughtered there, with an estimated 150 murdered by chemical weapons just last weekend in a town outside Damascus.

Illustration of Larry Kudlow by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Larry Kudlow to the rescue

The markets are on edge. Yet, then again, inflation is low, employment is high — in the case of blacks and Latinos historically high — and growth is healthy and looking to become very healthy. Dare we say it, robust? The reason for the edginess in the markets is that President Donald Trump has imposed tariffs on Communist China and threatens to impose still more tariffs. There is talk of a trade war. That should worry any champion of free markets.

Illustration on the abundance of American shale oil resourses by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Energy security at home bolsters U.S. leadership abroad

With turmoil bubbling from nearly every corner of the world, our policymakers must be leaning forward. Every element of national power (diplomatic, informational, military and economic) must be synchronized to ensure U.S. global leadership on the international stage. To paraphrase President Teddy Roosevelt, a "big stick" is essential but let's try to keep it in reserve.

Illustration on balance in the Supreme Court by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Restoring common sense to the Supreme Court

President Trump can cut taxes, build the wall, rebuild the military, pull us out of disastrous agreements such as the Paris climate accord and the Iran nuclear deal, and he can make America great again in many ways. But nothing he does will transcend or outlive his impact on the U.S. Supreme Court, beginning with the service of Justice Neil Gorsuch.

Facebook Freeze Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Bring on the cyber apocalypse

Many "progressives" — particularly millennials — were horrified to learn that some Facebook data might have been used to help elect Donald Trump president. Conservatives understand that social media was used to elect both Mr. Trump in 2016 and Barack Obama in 2012. They can't blame me; I have been off the social media grid since early 2012. Actually, I was never truly on it. I briefly opened a Facebook account when my son was in Afghanistan so I could see pictures of his surroundings. I quickly closed it after I began getting friend invitations from people I didn't want to be friends with.

The Korean War Memorial in Washington,DC    The Washington Times photo

Remembering the 'forgotten'

As I read the obituary in the newspaper on March 29 citing the death of renowned sculptor Frank Gaylord, my thoughts drifted back to that day several years ago when I was first exposed to his work. Mr. Gaylord created the 19 statues that are depicted in what many regard as the most beautiful and haunting of all the war memorials in Washington, D.C.

Illustration on military preparedness and budgeting by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

An opportunity for defense savings

In Washington, one particular theme animates nearly every conversation about government spending: Sequestration and the "readiness" of the U.S. military. But with the budget agreement of early 2018, Pentagon spending was boosted by almost $150 billion over the next two years. Discussion has now shifted toward how this new budget will be spent.

Facebook censors Diamond & Silk

I recently saw an interview with Lynnette "Diamond" Hardaway and Rochelle "Silk" Richardson on FOX News. I've seen both conservative women in interviews before, telling the public their opinions while giving support to our president. I always cheer them on because considering the left's continuous assaults on everything President Trump says and does, it is refreshing to hear from people with common sense.

North Carolina worker-friendly

A recent ranking by Business Insider puts North Carolina in the top 10 states for wage growth in 2017, and it's clear why: Wages in the state grew at an average rate of 3.8 percent last year.

Riveting fiction by a former CIA field operative

Fans of intelligence fiction can take heart at a jacket blurb for Fred Rustmann's splendid new novel, "False Flag." Gene Poteat, a career CIA officer and president emeritus of the Association of Former Intelligence Officers, writes that the book will have readers doing "late-night page-turning to see how it all turns out and wondering, 'Did this really pass CIA censors?'"

Patrick Reed holds the championship trophy after winning the Masters golf tournament Sunday, April 8, 2018, in Augusta, Ga. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip) **FILE**

Patrick Reed's defense of Masters title starts early

- Associated Press

Patrick Reed won't have to wait until next April to defend his title in the Masters. Even as he slipped into a green jacket, he was perceived more as a villain than a victor.

This image released by Entertainment Studios shows Jason Clarke as Ted Kennedy in a scene from "Chappaquiddick." (Claire Folger/Entertainment Studios via AP)

'Chappaquiddick' perfectly captures Ted Kennedy's immoral soul

"'I'm not gonna' become president." That's the reaction of Edward M. "Teddy" Kennedy (played perfectly by actor Jason Clarke) in the new movie "Chappaquiddick," shortly after he drunkenly drives a car off a bridge into a shallow pond and leaves a young woman to die in a half-submerged car.