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Illustration on the end of Net Neutrality regulations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Network neutrality comes to an end

They finally did it. After six months of debate, during which it received over 23 million public comments (of which half may have been fraudulent), the Federal Communications Commission voted on Dec. 14 to eliminate the network neutrality rules it imposed on broadband network operators during the Obama era.

Illustration on Hanukkah by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hanukkah, the first battle against transnationalism

Many think of Hanukkah as a fight for religious freedom. While religious freedom was at stake, it was part of a broader battle in behalf of the concept of national identity. The Maccabees, local Judeans who spearheaded the revolt against the overpowering northern Syrian Greeks, and who inspired the grass-roots, did so for the overarching cause of retaining Judea’s identity and Jewish character, which was under assault by those trying to denude Judea of its distinctiveness.

Illustration on global harmony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

People, planet and climate working together

Another year of weather is coming to a close. Even with some record-breaking snowfall from this past weekend’s storm in the eastern U.S., in many ways weather this year was not much different from any other year since the regular recording of temperature, precipitation and wind began across much of the globe 150 years ago.

Trump Administration Record on School Choice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping his promise about school choice

During the 2016 presidential campaign, candidate Donald Trump spoke passionately and often about school choice. Some school choice advocates, however, are beginning to rumble about the lack of progress on this key domestic policy promise. This grumbling has been building for some time among “talking heads” in the think-tank world.

Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off the stage with wife Kayla Moore after he spoke to supporters after an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala. Moore didn't concede the election to Democrat Doug Jones. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

What Roy Moore’s defeat portends

There were plenty of reasons why Republican Roy Moore’s defeat in the scandal-plagued Alabama election was a blessing for the GOP, despite losing a seat in a closely divided Senate.

Illustration on the GOP and the death penalty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Republicans reconsidering the death penalty

The mere idea of Republicans sponsoring death penalty repeal bills in great numbers was once considered an unlikely notion. However, Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty recently released a report revealing how Republicans are championing measures to end capital punishment at never-before-seen rates.

Doug Jones is greeted by a supporter before speaking during an election-night watch party Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. Jones has defeated Republican Roy Moore, a one-time GOP pariah who was embraced by the Republican Party and the president even after facing allegations of sexual impropriety. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Doug Jones — and Trump’s life just got a lot harder

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has been beating a dead horse in Congress for almost a year now, trying to pass his agendas legislatively through a Senate that’s dominated by Republicans yet consistently falls to Democratic Party will because of an ever-looming threat of filibuster. It’s only going to get tougher for Trump. Prepare for the stalled and even dropped legislation.

Illustration on Iranian influence in the Persian Gulf region by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s indirect strategy for regional influence

Last month, Yemen’s Houthis, the Iranian-supported rebel faction that now dominates the southern Persian Gulf’s most volatile state, fired a ballistic missile that came close to the Saudi capital, Riyadh, before being intercepted by the country’s military. The incident was a clear sign of the deepening sectarian conflict between Tehran and Riyadh now taking place throughout the Middle East. But it was also an accurate reflection of the sort of asymmetric tactics being prioritized by Iran in its strategy for regional dominance.

An open process for revamping net neutrality

While the pall of scandals and alleged scandals in the nation’s capital may have many voters thinking of the Beltway as a dysfunctional wasteland, the reality is that much of the machinery of government is, in fact, going full throttle trying to create jobs and spur growth. Only you wouldn’t know it from the daily news cycle.

Invisible Political Hand Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The invisible hand of economics

The invisible hand of American presidential politics is economics. Almost imperceptibly guiding the electorate, no other issue is as determinant of a presidency’s success. Currently, it is supporting Donald Trump through his political problems and could push him to re-election, as it has so many others.

In this Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson, file)

Drain the education swamp: College students’ tyrannical behavior must be stopped

How many conversations have we had with our friends, family and co-workers wondering what happened to the millennials? We expect a new generation to have new ideas and new ways of approaching the world. So how do we explain when a new generation is steeped in bullying, complaining about hurt feelings, demanding “safe spaces,” and using pride in fragile egos and weakened emotional states as the excuse to condemn free speech?

Illustration on China's role in diffusing the North Korean nuclear threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Nobody’s fool over North Korean nukes

Our news-hack kids — or, as Obama chief spinner Ben Rhodes called them, the “27-year-old know-nothings” — don’t have a clue as to the operative history of the North Korean nuclear threat to Asia, the Pacific and the United States.

Related Articles

Isabel Archer's life beyond 'Portrait'

If you have not read Henry James' "Portrait of a Lady," you may have a hard time getting into John Banville's "Mrs. Osmond." It picks up the tale of Isabel Archer, now Mrs. Gilbert Osmond, pretty much where James had left her. She had defied her husband and gone to England to see her dying cousin Ralph.

Rep. Jim Jordan, Ohio Republican. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Jim Jordan's masterful Judiciary performance

- The Washington Times

Show me the application, dude -- that was the underlying demand from Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan to FBI director Chris Wray during a House Judiciary hearing to determine a little bit more about Peter Strozk, the just-fired Robert Mueller attack dog.

Lindsey Vonn, of the United States, reacts in the finish area following her run in the women's World Cup downhill ski race at Lake Louise, Alberta, Friday, Dec. 1, 2017. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press via AP)

Lindsey Vonn's galling Olympian-size diss of Donald Trump

- The Washington Times

Lindsey Vonn, whose name is known within the sports world for Olympic gold medal skiing and without, for dating Tiger Woods, took some serious potshots at the president en route to this February's winter games in Pyeongchang. And in so doing, she pretty much slammed the country that elected Donald Trump -- the country she's supposed to be representing in the Olympics.

Pope Francis is hugged by a woman during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall at the Vatican, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Pope Francis, of all people, moans move to Jerusalem

- The Washington Times

You'd think the pope at least might be in President Donald Trump's court on the whole Tel Aviv-versus-Jerusalem thing -- the announced move of the U.S. Embassy from the former to the latter and the ensuing recognition of the latter as Israel's true capital. After all, the guy's the voice of the Catholic Church. If anyone might rise above lowly human politics to side with the spiritual on this matter, it'd be Pope Francis, yes?

Illustration of Elizabeth Warren by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pow Wow politics at Harvard Yard

Donald Trump thinks of himself as the comedian-in-chief reprising Elizabeth Warren as the butt of his pointed political satire. To her consternation, he draws chuckles if not guffaws calling the Massachusetts senator "Pocahontas," the celebrated squaw of early American history, needling her for inventing Cherokee ancestors just to claim a diversification slot on the Harvard faculty. "Fake ancestry," he might call it.

Illustration on Middle East peace by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Memo to Jared Kushner

President Trump's son-in-law and designated Middle East peace envoy, Jared Kushner, told the Brookings Institution's Saban Forum last weekend that a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians is key to solving larger goals, such as stopping Iranian aggression and Islamic extremism.

Illustration on Dennis Rodman and diplomacy with North Korea by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Dennis Rodman defense

On this, the 76th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, I am accompanying former basketball star and accidental diplomat Dennis Rodman on a visit to Guam. Like Hawaii was in 1941, Guam is an American territory with strategic military importance, home to around 7,000 brave American military personnel. And like Hawaii in 1941, Guam has been threatened by a foreign adversary. Instead of Gen. Tojo, Guam has been targeted by Marshal Kim Jong-un of North Korea, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, as a target for their potentially nuclear-armed missile strikes.

Education Savings Accounts for Californians Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A golden opportunity for California students

Whether Congress enacts a federal elementary and secondary education savings account (ESA) program as part of its tax reform package is anybody's guess. Yet one thing's for certain: The states shouldn't wait for Congress to expand educational options — especially California.

Affordable Pharmaceuticals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making drugs more affordable with the Creates Act

The politicians who set out to fix America's health care system ended up making many things worse. This is no surprise. It's the Washington way. Costs are still rising, even for those of us who've reached the age where Medicare has stepped in and become our primary insurance.

Two people prepare to ride the world's longest urban zip line, with a speed of up to 80 kilometers per hour on a one kilometer run from 170 meter to ground level, in the Marina district of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

How the Dubai miracle was realized

The Great Recession of 2008-09 convinced me, like many other observers, that the city-state of Dubai's razzmatazz — Go skiing in the boiling heat! Gawk at the world's tallest building! — was but a desert mirage. I lambasted Dubai in a 2009 article for "hucksterism and fast talk," running a "trompe l'oeil economy," and suckering outsiders with Ponzi-scheme real estate deals. It appeared to be only a matter of time until the whole edifice collapsed.

Advertisement from the Archdiocese of Washington rejected by the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority.

Rejecting 'the perfect gift'

The rate at which Christmas is being leached of spiritual meaning and replaced with frenzied online shopping isn't increasing fast enough for some.

In this undated photo provided by General Motors Holden, cars are assembled on the production line in Adelaide, Australia.  The Australian auto manufacturing era ends after more than 90 years on Friday, Oct. 20, 2017 when General Motors Co.'s last Holden sedan rolls off the production line in the industrial city of Adelaide. The nation has already begun mourning the demise of a home-grown industry in an increasing crowded and changing global car market. (General Motors Holden via AP)

No requiem for the internal-combustion engine

Standing on principle is admirable, but sitting on a Plan B just in case is smart. Automakers are doing both to navigate the obstacles they face in building vehicles both powerful and clean. It's only wise strategy — the future of the fuel is fuzzy.

President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington. Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

This year, in Jerusalem

For once, Donald Trump's taste for all-capital letters makes the right point with blunt precision: "Jerusalem IS Israel's capital: I will move our embassy there AND make peace with the Palestinians." Making peace with people who don't want peace is always difficult, when it's not impossible, but the president promises to soldier on.

Court should rule for gay couple

If the Supreme Court were to rule in favor of the baker who refused to bake a cake for a gay couple's wedding, it would risk spurring copycat claims ("The Latest: Baker and gay couple at court for cake arguments," Web, Dec. 5). Public-accommodations laws require businesses not to discriminate on the basis of race, gender, religion and (in almost half the states, including Colorado) sexual orientation. The First Amendment rights regarding free speech and the exercise of religion, though fundamental to our constitutional republic, do not abrogate these laws, the baker's sincere religious faith notwithstanding.

Up gas tax to fund transit work

Late Illinois Republican congressman and 1980 National Unity Party presidential candidate John Anderson was ahead of his time. In 1980 he called for a gasoline tax up to 50 cents per gallon to pay for highway- and transit-infrastructure projects.

Out of this world, but not as fine as its predecessor

You can count on an Andy Weir novel to be out of this world. He took us to the Red Planet in his phenomenally successful, mind-blowing debut novel, "The Martian." Now, in his second one, "Artemis," he sends us to the moon.

Russia and U.S. shaking hands

Deplorables and Useful Idiots for Peace

According to the current political vocabulary the "deplorables" are people who are rooting for Trump, while the "useful idiots" are those who believe that for the United States it is much better to have Russia as a friend rather than a foe.