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Illustration on the risks of the Middle-East peace process by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good Luck, Jared Kushner

Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law, and Jason Greenblatt, formerly one of the president’s real estate lawyers, are pursuing what the president calls the “ultimate deal,” a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. We should wish them luck because they’re going to need it.

Illustration on Trump's abiding political philosophy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Liberty, equity and fraternity

There’s a move to define Donald Trump as a populist, so as to link him to some of the nastier people in American politics, like Pitchfork Ben Tillman, Father Coughlin and David Duke.

Illustration on improvements to the GOP tax plan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Five ways to improve the tax bill

The Senate-passed tax bill is a policy triumph that will provide a shot of performance enhancing drugs into the veins of the economy. It’s not perfect, but the combined effect of cutting business tax rates, eliminating the state and local tax deduction, and repealing the ObamaCare individual mandate tax, means we are at the precipice of the biggest conservative policy victory since the Reagan years.

Stained Glass Badge Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The courage to judge

The Washington Surgi-Clinic in Washington, D.C. is now on record saying that, for a modest fee, it will perform a late-term abortion on a healthy, viable baby boy or girl.

With the deadline looming to pass a spending bill to fund the government by week's end, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., meets reporters following a closed-door strategy session, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Tougher challenges than cutting taxes

Passing tax reform in record time will prove a significant accomplishment, but it pales by comparison to the challenges Republicans must tackle next.

A Little Love for Roy Moore Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Another perspective on Roy Moore

Roy Moore’s name is indelibly linked to sexual predation; but do you know the specific accusations and accusers? Quite a number of women say that Mr. Moore asked them out when they were aged 16 to 18, and that he got their parents’ permission to do so. All this, 26 to 40 years ago. It’s worth looking carefully at the claims and the evidence.

Illustration on diplomacy and economic sanctions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Gauging the impact of economic sanctions

Carl von Clausewitz thought of military war as a continuation of diplomacy through other means. Economic sanctions are economic war and should be similarly regarded as tactics subordinated to a diplomatic strategy.

Illustration on the benefits of the GOP tax reform plan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Democratic tax-cut doomsayers

Earlier this week House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi predicted somewhat apocalyptically that passage of the Republican tax bill would quite simply mean “the end of the world.” It is true that the lady from the Bay is given to hyperbolic overstatement, but she seems to see herself as the leader of a party and movement that views those who disagree with them as bent upon destruction, murder and, yes, ending the world.

Illustration on the history of American money, banks and debt by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How America blazed a trail for government debt

As the United States faces a national debt of more than $20 trillion as a result of profligate spending — and looks to raise that ante with tax cuts — it should be noted that this untoward policy was begun exactly 327 years ago on Dec. 10. Massachusetts became the first colony to borrow money by issuing a paper currency — and the first in the history of Western Civilization (the Chinese were actually the inventors, putting forth notes as early as 806 A.D.).

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., joined by, from left, Small Business Administration Administrator Linda McMahon, Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., and Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., speaks to a group of small business owners as Republicans work to pass their sweeping tax bill, a blend of generous tax cuts for businesses and more modest tax cuts for families and individuals, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The fiscal mess that tax cuts won’t fix

We’ve heard a lot of frightening figures in the last week or so as the Senate approved a tax cut bill that is now in a conference with the House to iron out big differences between the two versions.

Illustration on Dennis Rodman and diplomacy with North Korea by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Dennis Rodman defense

On this, the 76th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, I am accompanying former basketball star and accidental diplomat Dennis Rodman on a visit to Guam. Like Hawaii was in 1941, Guam is an American territory with strategic military importance, home to around 7,000 brave American military personnel. And like Hawaii in 1941, Guam has been threatened by a foreign adversary. Instead of Gen. Tojo, Guam has been targeted by Marshal Kim Jong-un of North Korea, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, as a target for their potentially nuclear-armed missile strikes.

Related Articles

Nikki Haley, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, speaks during a Security Council meeting on the situation in North Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017 at United Nations headquarters. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Nikki Haley is sticking it to North Korea

- The Washington Times

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley just issued an oh-so-strong statement North Korea's way, telling the defiant regime its latest missile launch was a war-like act -- and if that's the way Kim Jong Un wants to play it, fine by the United States. But be prepared, she said. 'Cause North Korea will be "utterly destroyed" if war ensues, Haley vowed.

In this Jan. 16, 2015, file photo, Geraldo Rivera participates in "The Celebrity Apprentice" panel at the NBC 2015 Winter TCA  in Pasadena, Calif.  Rivera says he's "filled with regret" for initially discounting the sexual harassment allegations against his former Fox News Channel boss, Roger Ailes, and is apologizing for his skepticism.  (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

Geraldo Rivera opens mouth, inserts foot

- The Washington Times

Geraldo Rivera of Fox News took to Twitter to weigh in on the fast-moving Matt Lauer sexual misconduct claims to say, in essence: This is all part and parcel of the dating scene. Unfair characterization? You decide.

President Donald Trump waves as he walks on the South Lawn upon his return to the White House in Washington from a trip to Missouri on Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Not over by Thanksgiving

In August, when President Trump's lawyers persuaded him to refrain from attacking independent counsel Robert Mueller publicly — he had many times called Mr. Mueller's investigation a "witch hunt" — they also told him that the investigation was not aimed at him and not to worry because it would be over by Thanksgiving.

Cleaning Up the Department of the Interior Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cleaning up at Interior

In the 1990s, after posting the largest revenue losses at the time of any U.S. company in history, multinational computer giant IBM implemented an epic corporate turnaround. Having posted billions of dollars in annual losses, it was widely considered bloated and antiquated. Business executive Louis Gerstner Jr., largely credited with IBM's "rebirth," reflected that "Reorganization to me is shuffling boxes, moving boxes around. Transformation means that you're really fundamentally changing the way the organization thinks, the way it responds, the way it leads. It's a lot more than just playing with boxes." It's clear that the Interior Department needs such a transformation.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle    Associated Press photo

The welcome relief of a royal fairy tale

What a relief! Prince Harry and Meghan Markle -- young, romantic, endearing in their mythic appeal -- replace the old, aggressive harassers with paunch, thinning hair and sagging lecherous facial lines. There's happy news amidst the cheap and fake.

ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND EDITIONS, DEC. 2-3 - This Thursday, Nov. 23 2017 photo, shows the exterior of the historic Epsom Bible Church, moved to its current location in 2007 next to the town library, in Epsom, N.H. The same year it was moved, a New Hampshire Land and Community Heritage Investment Program grant helped make significant improvements to the building, often referred to as the meetinghouse. (Elizabeth Frantz/The Concord Monitor via AP)

The return of virtue

Rarely has the idiom "virtue is its own reward" looked better than it does in light of the sex scandals sweeping the nation. The so-called "prudishness," of a previous generation and the respect most men were once taught to have for women — and which Hugh Hefner and his disciples of "free love" mocked — are looking better with each passing day.

Anti-Immigration Political Parties in Europe Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Accepting Europe's anti-immigration parties

In a typical assessment of recent European elections, Katy O'Donnell writes in Politico that "Nationalist parties now have a toehold everywhere from Italy to Finland, raising fears the continent is backpedaling toward the kinds of policies that led to catastrophe in the first half of the 20th century." Many Jews, like Menachem Margolin, head of the European Jewish Association, echo her fear, seeing "a very real threat from populist movements across Europe."

Illustration on the near death experience of the NEH by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Near-death experience for the NEH

As the 2018 federal budget plan finally moves in its ponderous fashion from concurrent resolutions to committee markups, and then to a final conference bill and report, it will be easy to lose sight of a small but symbolic near-death experience within all the fine print — the survival of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Illustration on policing the police by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Who polices the police?

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller was supposed to run a narrow investigation into accusations of collusion between the Donald Trump campaign and the Russian government. But so far, Mr. Mueller's work has been plagued by almost daily improper leaks (e.g., "sources report," "it emerged," "some say") about investigations that seem to have little to do with his original mandate.

ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY, OCT. 29, 2017, AND THEREAFTER - In this Aug. 3, 2017, photo, packages pass through a scanner at an Amazon fulfillment center in Baltimore. While jobs have been lost in brick-and-mortar stores, many more have been gained from e-commerce and warehousing. Amazon accounts for much of the additional employment. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

The automation nation

Human progress is bound only by the limits of human imagination, and the boundaries are disappearing at warp speed. Information technology is lending an invisible hand to major sectors of human activity, and robots are muscling in on the rest. Whether it's all, or just mostly, to the good is a subject for ethicists, philosophers and theologians. For everyone else, the challenge is simply how to adjust.

Police officers patrol by an entrance to King's Cross underground train station in London, Friday, Jan. 7, 2011. More police officers were being deployed at transport hubs in London amid continuing fears of a terrorist attack, British media reported Thursday. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

Clearing up confusion

Some of our "genders" are out of control. It was never like this when everyone had not a gender, but a "sex," for better or worse. Anyone confused about which could look at a driver's license, or a student ID, and there it was, in black and white. But this was not good enough for the arbiters of political correctness.

Social Security, the Hill's elephant

In an otherwise strong and credible call to arms on the risk of congressional Republicans walking away from the Budget Control Act, Stephen Moore and Andrew Wofford devote only one line to the matter of Social Security ("Testing Republican spending restraint," Web, Nov. 13). The authors abruptly dismiss the topic, stating that benefits should be exempt. This is unfortunate and requires greater justification.

Citizenship first, party second

Politicians have always sparred with their opponents, yet in the Trump era, have we reached a tipping point? Due to the politics of character assassination, we are losing the ability to discuss issues and policies. Should we not be Americans first, then Republicans or Democrats, liberals or conservatives, second?

'Moments of an essentially personal kind'

Though Oliver Sacks published many peer-reviewed papers on his research into neurology, he is much better known for his numerous general-audience books and articles -- many about neurology, others about the history of science, and still others on botany, chemistry, evolution and the great scientists who took soaring leaps to reach our current understanding of the nature of life.

Washington Wizards guard Tomas Satoransky (31), of the Czech Republic, high-fives Kelly Oubre Jr. (12) during the second half of an NBA basketball exhibition game, Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)

On basketball: Without Wall, Satoransky gets his chance

- The Washington Times

Tomas Satoransky has dealt with sporadic playing time and usage since coming to the NBA last season. For the two weeks the Wizards are without John Wall, he will be strictly a point guard. Will that change what happens when Wall returns?