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Illustration on the growing threat of nuclear crisis with North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Discounting the North Korea threat countdown

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, speaking to the Reagan National Defense Forum on Dec. 2, offered up a doomsday prediction. When asked how close the United States and North Korea are to war, Mr. McMaster replied, “It’s increasing every day.” Sen. Jim Inhofe, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, seconded that statement in even more distressing language: “It is important for us here in the Senate to communicate to the American people the credible, grave, and immediate threat that we face . We don’t have the luxury of time.”

Illustration on The Washington Post's treatment of Judge Roy Moore by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Molested by the media

You don’t have to be a fan of Alabama’s Republican senatorial nominee Roy Moore to see that the Furies in the media aren’t willing to cut him a break even when his most lethal accusers have been caught falsifying the record. The late Charles Manson seems to have gotten a more sympathetic press. For the past two months, the “Never Moore” media have tried to sink the judge by insisting his dating of teenage girls when he was in his 30s was scandalous on its face, even when they were of age, their mothers approved and the women themselves conceded he never engaged in sexual misconduct.

Illustration on Roy Moore's run for the Senate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Roy Moore and the politics of winning

It now looks as if Roy Moore, the Republican candidate for the Senate in Alabama, will win his race, despite the publicity about his alleged improper behavior with a 14-year-old girl 38 years ago, and maybe others young girls as well.

FILE - In this May 7, 2015, file photo, labor union members and supporters rally for better wages in New York. Nearly 2 million New York workers are unionized. New York's powerful labor unions are lining up against a constitutional convention, warning voters that opening up the state's main governing document could lead to the erosion of worker protections and rights such as collective bargaining. In November 2017, New Yorkers will be asked whether to hold a convention, where delegates would consider big changes to the constitution. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Reining in the worker center end run

Is it the beginning of the end for Big Labor’s henchmen? You’d be forgiven if you think I’m referring to the Hoffas. I’m actually talking about so-called worker centers, which have recently been the labor movement’s bludgeon — all while avoiding federal rules on union transparency and conduct.

Illustration on the risks of the Middle-East peace process by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good Luck, Jared Kushner

Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law, and Jason Greenblatt, formerly one of the president’s real estate lawyers, are pursuing what the president calls the “ultimate deal,” a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. We should wish them luck because they’re going to need it.

Illustration on Trump's abiding political philosophy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Liberty, equity and fraternity

There’s a move to define Donald Trump as a populist, so as to link him to some of the nastier people in American politics, like Pitchfork Ben Tillman, Father Coughlin and David Duke.

Illustration on improvements to the GOP tax plan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Five ways to improve the tax bill

The Senate-passed tax bill is a policy triumph that will provide a shot of performance enhancing drugs into the veins of the economy. It’s not perfect, but the combined effect of cutting business tax rates, eliminating the state and local tax deduction, and repealing the ObamaCare individual mandate tax, means we are at the precipice of the biggest conservative policy victory since the Reagan years.

Stained Glass Badge Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The courage to judge

The Washington Surgi-Clinic in Washington, D.C. is now on record saying that, for a modest fee, it will perform a late-term abortion on a healthy, viable baby boy or girl.

With the deadline looming to pass a spending bill to fund the government by week's end, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., meets reporters following a closed-door strategy session, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Tougher challenges than cutting taxes

Passing tax reform in record time will prove a significant accomplishment, but it pales by comparison to the challenges Republicans must tackle next.

A Little Love for Roy Moore Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Another perspective on Roy Moore

Roy Moore’s name is indelibly linked to sexual predation; but do you know the specific accusations and accusers? Quite a number of women say that Mr. Moore asked them out when they were aged 16 to 18, and that he got their parents’ permission to do so. All this, 26 to 40 years ago. It’s worth looking carefully at the claims and the evidence.

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Jimmy Kimmel doesn't appear too shaken up that his Republican viewership has taken a plunge since he waded into politics on his late-night ABC talk show. Appearing on "CBS Sunday Morning," the comedian said he wouldn't change a thing about his approach to President Trump or heated topics like health care and gun control. (CBS)

Jimmy Kimmel goes all Christiany on Roy Moore -- and accepts fight

- The Washington Times

Jimmy Kimmel, of comedy talk show fame, apparently is a card-carrying Christian who's been so offended by Roy Moore, that he first, sent a character from his show to disrupt one of the Senate candidate's rallies and then, when confronted, jumped on Twitter and late-night TV and agreed to a man-to-man. That's right. Kimmel actually agreed to a fight with Moore.

In this July 7, 2015, file photo, Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, right, is led into the courtroom by San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi, left, and Assistant District Attorney Diana Garciaor, center, for his arraignment at the Hall of Justice in San Francisco. (Michael Macor/San Francisco Chronicle via AP, Pool, File)

Trump nails it -- Kate Steinle ends in 'disgraceful verdict'

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump tweeted that the trial of Jose Ines Garcia Zarate in the killing of Kate Steinle ended with a "disgraceful verdict." And he's absolutely right. No matter the finding of the jury, it doesn't change the fact Garcia Zarate never should have been in America in the first place -- never should have been on the streets of San Francisco.

Hedy Lamarr . (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When the prey becomes the predator

- The Washington Times

It's only a matter of time until the female of the species becomes predator, and is caught in the web of what the country preacher called "he'in and she'in," which has been the favorite game of men and women since Eve disdained perfection in the Garden of Eden.

Jeff Sessions at the Department of Justice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Jeff Sessions' ambitious Justice Department

In February, 2016, a full nine months before the presidential election and days before Super Tuesday, Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions endorsed Donald Trump, the first sitting senator to do so. I recall being in a meeting of several other Washington conservatives with Mr. Sessions shortly after his endorsement. Mr. Trump, said Mr. Sessions "is the candidate who is the best advocate for our ideas. If he wins, he has the best chance of putting the country back onto the conservative mold left by Ronald Reagan."

Illustration on the U.S. reflecting on its motivations in foreign policy actions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Aligning with Saudi Arabia's designs

The United States faces a question that it seems to want to ignore: What kind of nation are we? The question looms up in the face of America's complicity in an ongoing humanitarian crisis in the Middle East. We are helping Saudi Arabia starve the people of Yemen — men, women, and children — into submission to the Saudi will.

Illustration on Somalia taking up the fight against the al-Shabab insurgency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

It is up to Somalia to combat al-Shabab

According to U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM), there have been 18 airstrikes to date this year in Somalia — more than four times the average for the previous seven years. At the same time, the number of U.S. forces in Somalia has more than doubled. The target of the U.S. military in Somalia is al-Shabab, an Islamist militant group allied with al Qaeda and now considered the deadliest terrorist organization in Africa.

Illustration on Republican tax legislation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The anticipated tax legislation

Benjamin Franklin, who famously said that nothing in this world can be certain "except death and taxes," would love the Republican tax cut bill that's headed for a vote in the Senate this week.

2017 AP YEAR END PHOTOS - Opposition lawmakers brawl with pro-government militias who are trying to force their way into the National Assembly during a special session coinciding with Venezuela's independence day, in Caracas, on July 5, 2017. At least five lawmakers were injured in the attack. (AP Photos/Fernando Llano)

From revolution to ruin in Venezuela

Not so long ago Venezuela, which stumbles along as if on a national breadline, was the wealthiest country in Latin America. And why not? It has the world's largest proven oil reserves and abundant fertile farmland. Its governmental institutions were once efficient and largely free of corruption. With a few good funerals, times could be good again.

Vice President Mike Pence speaks to a gathering of Republican governors in Austin, Texas, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017, at the J.W. Marriott. (Ricardo B. Brazziell/Austin American-Statesman via AP) ** FILE **

Discretion makes a comeback

That's Vice President Mike Pence getting the last laugh in the wake of the torrent of sexual-misconduct charges against Washington politicians, journalists and entertainment industry titans who are suddenly not so titanic.

Reform Mauritania now

The United Nations sets aside Dec. 2 as its International Day for the Abolition of Slavery. From sweatshops and prison labor, to trafficked women and men forced into unpaid work or prostitution, some 40 million people around the world are held in horrific conditions. But if there's an open sore, it's Mauritania in West Africa.

Reaping fruits of sexual revolution

Why is anyone surprised to learn that in our present social climate there is and has been for the past 40 years rampant sexual improprieties and assaults against women ("The return of virtue," Web, Nov. 29)? We are reaping the rotten fruits of the sexual revolution of the 1960s and '70s, during which the "Free Love" movement erased modesty and respect for women. The fairer sex became fair play and stigmas were removed from the exploits of amorous behavior. The #MeToo hashtag is a joke. I doubt there is a woman alive who has never experienced a sexual impropriety in her lifetime.

Tax cuts, spending and Democrats

- The Washington Times

Ever since Richard Nixon presented stakeholders in the nation's capital with limited home rule in 1973, Democrats have held the purse strings and dived into public coffers for liberal causes.

Ukrainian lawmakers scuffled during a parliament session in October. Former Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili, who now heads an opposition party, accuses President Petro Poroshenko of stalling reforms and covering up corruption. (Associated Press/File)

Early promise of Ukraine's war on corruption fades by the day

Two years ago in Kiev, I met with Artem Sytnik and his colleagues at the National Anti-Corruption Bureau, along with the Specialized Anti-Corruption Prosecutor's Office, of Ukraine, and wrote a profile headlined, "Can this man save Ukraine?" Mr. Sytnik at the time had just been installed as the head of NABU.

Nikki Haley, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, speaks during a Security Council meeting on the situation in North Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017 at United Nations headquarters. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Nikki Haley is sticking it to North Korea

- The Washington Times

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley just issued an oh-so-strong statement North Korea's way, telling the defiant regime its latest missile launch was a war-like act -- and if that's the way Kim Jong Un wants to play it, fine by the United States. But be prepared, she said. 'Cause North Korea will be "utterly destroyed" if war ensues, Haley vowed.

In this Jan. 16, 2015, file photo, Geraldo Rivera participates in "The Celebrity Apprentice" panel at the NBC 2015 Winter TCA  in Pasadena, Calif.  Rivera says he's "filled with regret" for initially discounting the sexual harassment allegations against his former Fox News Channel boss, Roger Ailes, and is apologizing for his skepticism.  (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

Geraldo Rivera opens mouth, inserts foot

- The Washington Times

Geraldo Rivera of Fox News took to Twitter to weigh in on the fast-moving Matt Lauer sexual misconduct claims to say, in essence: This is all part and parcel of the dating scene. Unfair characterization? You decide.