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Foreign interference that no democracy can ignore

- The Washington Times

Recently, the world witnessed an unusual sight: Mark Zuckerberg, the whiz kid who founded the social media giant Facebook, testifying before the U.S. Senate.

Thinking Differently Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A fresh wind in the Middle East

For decades Saudi leaders expressed in vituperative fashion an animus to the state of Israel as an illegal entity in what is assumed to be Arab land. While King Salman reaffirmed a steadfast position on the Palestinian issue and the legitimate rights of the Palestinian people to Jerusalem as their capital, he made an astonishing claim that the Jewish people have a right to a “nation state in at least part of their ancestral home.” On its face this may not seem as much, but based on commentary over the last 70 years this comment is extraordinary.

In this April 21, 2018, file photo, people watch a TV screen showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The signs read: "North Korea says it has suspended nuclear tests." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

A summit imperiled by Rocket Man’s travel tribulations

- The Washington Times

“Just getting there, as Cunard once boasted of transatlantic crossings by ship, “is half the fun.” The Atlantic is still there, but ocean liners are not, and almost the only way to cross the ocean sea now is by air. That’s no fun at all. Dining aboard an ocean liner has been replaced by dining aloft, and you’re lucky to get a pretzel or a stale cracker.

Illustration on the Syrian situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What’s next in Syria

Western civilization — in the guise of its three leading powers — struck back at international lawlessness when they hit Syrian chemical sites on April 13. It remains to be seen whether the strike had the desired effect of deterring the Syrian leadership from the further use of such weapons. If it does, President Trump’s claim of “mission accomplished” will be justified. That brings up the key question of “what next?” if chemical weapons use continues.

Apprenticeship Programs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Over-investing in higher education

After decades worrying about a shortage of good-paying jobs, America has too many — manufacturing, construction and increasingly service businesses can’t find the qualified workers needed to expand. This is a significant barrier to permanently restoring 3 percent to 4 percent growth so that the nation can meet the needs of an aging population, finance its commitments to defend freedom — through our military and costly instruments of soft power — and invest in infrastructure and R&D without becoming dangerously indebted.

A first step for health reform

It’s beginning to look like the Republicans have pretty much abandoned their promise to “repeal and replace” Obamacare. Considering they don’t have the votes to do it this does not come as a big surprise. If they want to remain in power though, they have to come up with something.

Targeting Handguns Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The left’s war on self-defense

In Arizona, there is a special election to replace Rep. Trent Franks, who resigned earlier this year. Making special appearances to help the Democrat in that race are the kids from Parkland, Florida.

Illustration on Kim Jong-un's diplomatic wish list by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What Kim Jong-un really wants

If one were to make a list of “what Kim really wants” in his discussions with the U.S., such would be quite straightforward, however — at least so far — they have not been expressed as such.

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'A commanding presence with a resolute manner'

At 49, writes John Greenya, Judge Neil Gorsuch had "a commanding presence with a resolute manner" as he testified before the committee. As Fox News' Charles Krauthammer put it, "This guy is out of central casting. This is a Gary Cooper character. Attacking him would be a losing proposition."

In this Feb. 6, 2018, photo, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., joined at right by Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., talks with reporters at the Capitol in Washington. Ryan is backing McCarthy as his successor. In an interview with NBC's "Meet the Press," Ryan says McCarthy is "the right person." "I think Kevin is the right guy to step up," Ryan says in the interview that will air Sunday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

A new Speaker

Paul Ryan shocked no one, at least no one who was paying attention, when last week he announced he would not seek re-election to the House of Representatives and would leave the Speaker's chair when his term is up in January.

Former FBI director James B. Comey Mr. Comey is on a book tour, with multiple media interviews, to promote, "Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership," an account of his time in the Trump administration. (Associated Press)

James Comey thinks it's normal to smash old cell phones with a hammer

- The Washington Times

James Comey thinks it's pretty normal for people to destroy their cell phones when they are done using them because "if it's resold, someone doesn't end up with your information." Um... how, exactly, does one sell a destroyed cell phone? Perhaps Comey meant that he thinks it's common for people to destroy their cell phones to ensure that they are not resold.

This Friday, June 30, 2017, file photo shows a librarian holding an expensive rare law book at the University of Virginia School of Law rare books collection in Charlottesville, Va. Nearly 200 years ago, Thomas Jefferson came up with a legal reading list for lawyers. Now, the University of Virginia is putting those books online. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Thomas Jefferson statue smearing as 'Racist + Rapist' despicable and revisionist

- The Washington Times

Thomas Jefferson was a complicated guy. So smearing his statue, as vandals just did, with the red painted words of "Racist + Rapist" at the University of Virginia, the college he actually founded, fails to take into account the complicated twists and turns of his beliefs, the pragmatic nature of his political leanings, the ultimate efforts he made to ban slavery from a significant portion of America.

Then-FBI Director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, May 3, 2017. Mr. Comey is blasting President Donald Trump as unethical and "untethered to truth" and his leadership of the country as "ego driven and about personal loyalty." Comey's comments come in a new book in which he casts Trump as a mafia boss-like figure who sought to blur the line between law enforcement and politics and tried to pressure him regarding the investigation into Russian election interference. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

'Slimeball' versus Stormy Daniels

- The Washington Times

Call it a pole-dancing standoff between the Siren Stripper and the Leakin' Lyin' Nasty Giraffe, code-named "Slimeball" by the highest levels of the United States government.

This Sept. 28, 2017, file photo shows Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch speaking at the 50th anniversary of the Fund for America Studies luncheon at the Trump Hotel in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

A black-robed counterrevolution

Federal judges sit on the bench for life and can either uphold the law or rule like tyrants. This puts judicial appointments right near the top of the most important things a president can do.

Illustration on ACLU perception of constitutional rights by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Just a shadow of the old ACLU

Remember when the American Civil Liberties Union was a staunch defender of First Amendment rights? The ACLU even defended the right of American Nazis to march in Skokie, Ill., the home of thousands of Holocaust survivors. Well, nowadays the ACLU is but a shadow of its former self, as it increasingly succumbs to the left's latest siren songs.

Illustration on the hazards of being a Chinese-language reporter with VOA by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The most hazardous job in the federal government

Earlier this year, dozens of relatives of five reporters of the Uyghur Service, Radio Free Asia (RFA), were detained by the Chinese government in China's Xinjiang region. The medieval type of practice was clearly a powerful means of retaliation against the reporters. Such long-standing practice promised severe punishment to those who dared to challenge the regime by holding their loved ones hostage.

Chart to accompany Moore article of April 16, 2018.

The trillion dollar myth

There is an old saying that you can't teach an old dog new tricks, and we've learned that again with the Congressional Budget Office and its latest highly misleading fiscal forecast.

Demonstrators rally in support of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) outside the Capitol, Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018, in Washington, on the second day of the federal shutdown. Democrats have been seeking a deal to protect the "Dreamers," who have been shielded against deportation by DACA, which President Donald Trump halted last year. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) **FILE**

No discounts for Dreamers

Life is not fair, as John F. Kennedy famously said, and sometimes it's not fair for everybody. The Arizona Supreme Court last week ruled that the "Dreamers," children brought to the United States by their illegal-immigrant parents, are not eligible for in-state tuition rates at Arizona's three state universities and at its network of community colleges.

Vote this November

Our nation has reached a critical stage in its ongoing evolution. We are dangerously close to becoming a socialist country (think Venezuela). We elected President Trump because he promised to get us back on the path our Founders intended. He has been working to do that but it's been slow and difficult because much of Congress and the federal courts have fought him every step of the way.

FILE - In this Aug. 10, 2012 file photo a customer pumps gas into his dual-tank pickup truck at a 76 gas station in Los Angeles. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt indicated this week he may target a longstanding federal waiver that allows California to set its own, tougher tailpipe emission standards, an exception that's allowed the state to prod the rest of nation to do more against air pollution and climate change for a half-century. (AP Photo/Grant Hindsley, File)

Misjudging data and its deadly consequences

Following an International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) review of benzene, a chemical commonly found in gasoline, tobacco smoke and other industries, a chemical engineer is alleging serious errors, which could have potentially deadly consequences for workers exposed to the substance.