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Building the Deal with South Korea Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Building the deal with North Korea

The first pundit responses to President Donald Trump’s agreement with Kim Jong-un for the denuclearization of North Korea have leaned heavily on a series of inept comparisons with President Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran. The differences are as stark as they are important.

Illustration on the Pentagon's data cloud decision by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the Pentagon clouds its future

Before D-Day, Gen. George Patton commanded an army that didn’t exist. His First U.S. Army Group was supposedly training around East Anglia. It featured phony tanks so German spy planes could report on them. It kept up a steady stream of radio traffic so German spies could track the movements of troops. And it featured divisions that seemed to be preparing to invade Calais.

FILE - In this file  July 7, 2016, photo then-FBI Director James Comey testifies before the House Oversight Committee to discuss Hillary Clinton's email investigation, at the Capitol in Washington. The Justice Department's watchdog faults former Comey for breaking with protocol in his handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation. But it says his decisions were not driven by political bias ahead of the 2016 election.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Former FBI Director James Comey delivered 3 blows that put the bureau down but not out

Current and former agents of the once most respected name in law enforcement must cringe in helpless disbelief every time a news headline crosses their computer containing the letters “FBI.” “What is it this time?” They must think to themselves as they discover another verbal lashing by pundits and politicians in the furtherance of the day’s agenda, but under the guise of patriotism and truth. Since when did the men and women of the FBI become a weapon of war in politics? What did they do to deserve this?

Illustration on U.S./ROK military exercizes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Korean war games in the balance

I arrived in Seoul on the same day as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo after the Singapore summit. In the wake of the meeting between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, Mr. Pompeo and I had essentially the same task: Reassuring our allies.

Illustration on the I.G. report on the DOJ by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Outrage over bias at the FBI

The much-anticipated report of the Justice Department inspector general (IG) has satisfied neither Republicans nor Democrats. If you expected that the IG report would settle the endless debate about double standards (favoring either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump), that it would identify malefactors and punish the guilty, then you were sorely disappointed. Instead, Inspector General Michael Horowitz investigated heavily, labored mightily and produced a wrist-breaking tome that history will find wanting.

Anthony Bourdain Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The despair of Anthony Bourdain

In the early 1900s, G.K. Chesterton spoke of the unavoidable consequences of denying God as our Creator and worshipping science above the sacred. Observing that the naturalists of his day were only too willing to turn their science into a philosophy and then impose their new religion upon all of culture with near fanatic zeal, Chesterton said, “I [have] never said a word against eminent men of science. What I complain of is a vague popular philosophy which supposes itself to be scientific when it is really nothing but a sort of new religion and an uncommonly nasty one.”

Related Articles

Krauthammer leaves too soon

It was with sadness that I read the announcement by Charles Krauthammer of his imminent death ("Krauthammer a classic, classy neoconservative intellectual — whether you agreed with him or not," Web, June 10). He is a man of conscience and a fighter for what he considers to be a worthy cause. With devastating logic, he has demolished the views of his opponents concerning both national and international affairs.

The tension between healing and justice

The question of why communities across the country should continue to honor the man who 157 years ago took command of the Army battling U.S. troops has been a roiling debate for some years -- intensified since the out-of-control protests in Charlottesville last summer over steps to remove the city's monument to Robert E. Lee.

Elephant Stabbed Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Deconstructing young minds

Since November 2016, the deep state and its media allies have spent considerable time and money cultivating animus toward President Trump and the Republican-led Congress among younger voters.

Illustration on the ascendancy of al-Sadr by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

An Iraqi threat goes mainstream

Iraqi Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's rise to power has not yet reached its zenith. The May 18 Iraqi parliamentary election, in which his Sairun political block won a plurality, has elevated him to the position of de facto leader of the Iraqi nation. Mr. al-Sadr won't become prime minister because he didn't run for a parliamentary seat, but he will control the formation of the next Iraqi government.

International Space Station Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Preserving America's supremacy in space

Acquiescing to efforts to end government funding of the International Space Station (ISS) by 2025 would be a historic and costly mistake to the tune of billions, destroying an engineering, science and geopolitical marvel and elevating America's enemies to supremacy in space.

Chart to accompany Moore article of June 11, 2018.

Trump's economic boom

The left is quickly running out of excuses for why President Trump's economic policies have caused a boom — rather than the bust they predicted with such great certainty.

Illustration on "gay Christianity" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wolves in shepherd's clothing

A bit of news you may have missed over the past couple weeks was that of about 2,000 high-profile Christian pastors and church elders who, on May 24, marched on the White House.

President Donald Trump arrives at Paya Lebar Air Base for a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, Sunday, June 10, 2018, in Singapore. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

A crossroads at the summit

No politician owns the exclusive rights to "hope and change." As a campaign slogan, it worked well for a moment for Barack Obama, but in hindsight it was little more than an attractive but empty phrase. He wowed the world by signing the Iran Nuclear Deal, but left the terror-friendly regime in Tehran on course to complete a doomsday arsenal. President Trump, girding himself for a nuclear summit with North Korea, promises to deal only in the hard currency of reality.

Zero tolerance for filth

It is truly a national disgrace when tastelessness and moral depravity can pass for humor and the overriding residual focus is only on the reaction and response by two television networks.

What national intelligence is and is not

Regardless of whatever special counsel Robert Mueller III eventually reports, the 2016 presidential election has spawned enough conspiracy theories to surpass "Who Shot Kennedy?" on any list of supposedly unresolved mysteries, justified or not.

Colorado owes baker

Incredibly, the U.S. Supreme Court found in favor of a Christian baker who refused to bake a wedding cake for two gay men. What would the original court ruling have been if these gay men had tried to force a Muslim bakery to bake a wedding cake for their marriage? What would the Colorado court have done? I am sure they wouldn't have touched this issue.

Cars go by the scene Monday, March 19, 2018, near where a pedestrian was stuck by an Uber vehicle in autonomous mode late Sunday night in Tempe, Ariz. The vehicle was in autonomous mode with an operator behind the wheel when a woman walking outside of a crosswalk was hit. Uber suspended all of its self-driving testing Monday after what is believed to be the first fatal pedestrian crash involving the vehicles. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

The mad money rush to market self-driving cars

- The Washington Times

With self-driving vehicle technology, big bucks are on the line. And in the words of at least one mechanical engineering expert, the rush to produce -- the rush to profit -- is both real and dangerous. Truly, the real winner of this autonomous car race will be the one who forgoes the short-term IPOs for the longer-term of consumer confidence.

Amyx Hardware & Roofing Supplies in Grainger County, Tennessee, is making national headlines after posting a "No Gays Allowed" sign in the storefront window following the Supreme Court's ruling in favor of same-sex marriage. (WBIR)

'No Gays Allowed' sign gives Christianity a bad name

- The Washington Times

Dear Mr. Jeff Amyx: Tear down this sign. Amyx, a Baptist minister and the owner of a Tennessee hardware store, has reportedly decided to celebrate the Supreme Court's recent ruling regarding a cake baker who refused creative service to a gay couple by putting up this sign in the front window: "No Gays Allowed." He shoudn't.