Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Former President Bill Clinton speaks at a gathering in Little Rock, Ark., on Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017, marking 25 years since his election. He and his wife Hillary Clinton appeared before about 2,600 people at the event in the Statehouse Convention Center. (AP Photo/Kelly P. Kissel)

The liberal ruse of feminism

Charlie Rose, formerly of PBS and CBS. Glenn Thrush of The New York Times. The collapse of the liberal establishment Masters of the Universe continues. Yet for some reason, the Democratic and liberal establishment think now is the time to condemn … Bill Clinton.

American Negotiations with North Korea Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Encouraging signs following Trump’s visit to Seoul

I was part of a small fact-finding delegation to South Korea immediately after President Trump’s Nov. 7-8 visit. The message we received in Seoul was universal: President Trump’s visit was a success; his presentation at the National Assembly was well-received. To a person, all were appreciative of the president’s comments, juxtaposing a vibrant liberal democracy in the South and an authoritarian and capricious regime in the North.

Volunteers tie the wooden cross that was carried through the streets of Etna, Pa., a Pittsburgh suburb, to the larger cross in the cemetery where their annual "Drama of The Cross," service was done on Good Friday, Friday, April 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) ** FILE **

America on fire, as love for God cools

- The Washington Times

America was built on Judeo-Christian principles, steered into existence by Founding Fathers who believed — yes, even the less religious ones — that this republic could not survive absent a moral, virtuous people. My, how wise the founders. That was then. This is now: Roy Moore. Al Franken.

Illustration on cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Closing the cyber skills gap

In the digitally integrated world we live in today, it’s nearly impossible to function successfully in any industry without making cybersecurity staffing a priority. No matter the size, no matter the sector, businesses all across the country are in growing need of professionals who specialize in cybersecurity.

Illustration of Bill and Hillary Clinton by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A tale of two cultures

“Prospect of New Special Counsel Rattles Justice” was the scary front-page headline on a recent, worried edition of The Washington Post. The faux fuss was caused by Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ suggestion that after weighing recommendations from senior prosecutors, he might appoint a special counsel to investigate Hillary Clinton’s role in the Uranium One deal.

Map of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Nagorno Karabakh

Losing the moral compass over Nagorno-Karabakh

When it comes to American foreign aid, it is often the message — rather than the dollar figure — that matters. A textbook case is Nagorno-Karabakh, the internationally recognized Azerbaijani territory, illegally occupied by Armenia.

Senator Al Franken   Associated Press photo

Back to the future with Franken

- The Washington Times

It’s already begun. Liberal activists and pundits are arguing that Minnesota Sen. Al Franken’s documented piggishness toward women should be discounted, forgiven or perhaps even ignored given the fact that he is, well, one of them.

Hillary and Bill Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Who knew so much testosterone rides the capital breeze?

- The Washington Times

These are not happy times for anybody. You can’t keep up with the serial sexual offenders without a scorecard, and the list grows longer every day and all the claims won’t fit on one scorecard. Seekers of cash settlements are advised to not take checks, and hurry to the bank and get in line before the cash runs out.

No choice for China

If China doesn’t decide to intervene and essentially “denuclearize” North Korea — and soon — the Pacific region will “nuclearize” itself, in reaction to China’s inaction and the growing North Korean nuclear threat.

Trump Trade Policies Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump’s unwise economic nationalism

At the recent Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit, Presidents Trump and Xi Jinping offered competing and disturbing visions of a new international economic order.

Illustration on volunteerism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Crowding out compassion

Anyone who has ever seen footage of a “Black Friday” stampede knows the holiday season can bring out the worst in people. So it’s important to remember that it can also bring out the best — and to realize that government can inadvertently dampen our more compassionate impulses.

An ethanol plant stands next to a cornfield near Nevada, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File) **FILE**

Corn grows all too well in the swamp

Corn has taken root in the swamp that surrounds Congress. It has meant big bucks for Big Corn, but most everyone else is paying the price.

Related Articles

NFL, look to Canada, U.K.

Maybe the NFL ought to take a page out of the books of other professional sports, those that manage their pre-game national anthems with grace. The England and German national soccer teams not only sing their respective anthems but recently also wear arm bands with poppies on them. The English teams all wear poppies on their uniforms for the week prior to their national veterans/remembrance day. Hockey Night in Canada had a solemn tribute to all veterans prior to last Saturday's game, and it included a pipe band and a vignette about soldiers from prior conflicts. Even the flamboyant Don Cherry wore a subdued blue blazer with a Royal Canadian Legion emblem, as well as a poppy — as all Canadian coaches wear for this hallowed period.

A statesman in life, forgotten in death

History is unkind to compromisers. If they succeed, disaster is averted and the compromiser is soon forgotten. If they fail, they're often scapegoated for subsequent events. Neville Chamberlain, the British prime minister whose negotiations averted war with Hitler over Czechoslovakia comes to mind. Chamberlain thought his concessions had brought "peace in our time."

Matt Drudge (Associated Press/Brian K. Diggs) ** FILE **

Drudge lets loose on The Washington Post

- The Washington Times

Matt Drudge of Drudge Report fame unleashed on The Washington Post on Twitter, calling out the media outlet for a headline and story that seemed to suggest the popular site was pro-Russia. This is a well-deserved smack-down of The Post.

In this Oct. 18, 2017, file photo, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell speaks during a news conference, in New York. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

Roger Goodell's 'unseemly,' 'offensive' salary quest

- The Washington Times

Roger Goodell, the much-beleaguered NFL commissioner -- the one who will probably go down as Most Tone Deaf football league chief in history, at least when it comes to respecting fans' wishes -- has reportedly asked for a $49.5 million annual salary for life in his recent contract negotiations. Oh, and a private jet, too. Oh, and lifetime health benefits for his family.

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore of Alabama says it is Majority Leader Mitch McConnell who should step aside. (Associated Press)

Roy Moore to sue The Washington Post

- The Washington Times

Roy Moore, the Republican's nominee in the Alabama fight for the U.S. Senate seat, announced he's going to sue The Washington Post for the series of stories that implicate him in sexual dalliances with underage girls 40 years ago. He said this as political players in his own party were folding like cheap card tables to get him to quit.

This combination photo shows, top row from left, film producer Harvey Weinstein, former Amazon Studios executive Roy Price, director James Toback, New Orleans chef John Besh, middle row from left, fashion photographer Terry Richardson, New Republic contributing editor Leon Wiseltier, former NBC News political commentator Mark Halperin, former Defy Media executive Andy Signore, and bottom row from left, filmmaker Brett Ratner, actor Kevin Spacey, actor Jeremy Piven and actor Dustin Hoffman. In the weeks since the string of allegations against Weinstein first began, an ongoing domino effect has tumbled through not just Hollywood but at least a dozen other industries. (AP Photos/File)

'Sex Scandal' (Part One)

America is in the midst of a huge, sordid sex scandal. As horrific as it is to have so much alleged sexual harassment and abuse coming to light, worse still is the reality that we should not be surprised.

Tremors in the Saudi Arabian Kingdom Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The destabilization of Saudi Arabia

A wide variety of threats, ranging from intensifying proxy wars and hostile neighbors to the purge of prominent individuals, seems to be destabilizing the House of Saud.

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, right, leaves the Fort Bragg courtroom facility as the judge deliberates in a sentencing hearing at Fort Bragg, N.C., Friday, Nov. 3, 2017. Bergdahl, who walked off his base in Afghanistan in 2009 and was held by the Taliban for five years, pleaded guilty to desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

The Bergdahl liberals

I thought later about the women's admiration of Mr. Obama while reading about Army deserter Bowe Bergdahl's light, dishonorable discharge without incarceration for leaving his post in 2009 and causing severe injuries and possibly related deaths of several fellow soldiers in Afghanistan. Sgt. Bergdahl's return was procured by Mr. Obama in 2014 in exchange for five Taliban commanders who have gone back to plotting the destruction of the United States and our allies.

Illustration on child tax credits by Linas Garsys/ The Washington Times

Investing in long-term prosperity

Though we don't agree on the overall tax package being debated in Washington, we do agree that Congress should act to increase the value of and access to the child tax credit and the child and dependent care tax credit for families with children ages 0-5 as key steps in helping low- and middle-income working families and investing in our country's long-term prosperity.

Illustration on William Carey    The Washington Times

When Reformers traveled to India, China and Korea

In the U.S. and Europe, churches dedicated entire services and sermon series to the subject, tracing their theological history back to Oct. 31, 1517, Reformation Day. In Germany, where the date was declared a national holiday, more than 2 million people from across the world pilgrimaged to Wittenberg, the birthplace of the Reformation, to breathe the air of the historic occasion.

Illustration on failed effort to cut taxes by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The flawed House tax plan

The House Republican tax bill faces a tough climb to passage because it simply won't deliver the kind of growth the administration claims and it distributes benefits unfairly.

Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore waits to speak the Vestavia Hills Public library, Saturday, Nov. 11, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. According to a Thursday, Nov. 9 Washington Post story an Alabama woman said Moore made inappropriate advances and had sexual contact with her when she was 14. Moore has denied the allegations. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Roy Moore's day in court

Sometimes a lynch mob gets a guilty man, but it's nevertheless an unspeakable evil. The accusations against Roy Moore in Alabama are sordid and serious, but so far they're accusations, not charges, and he is entitled to his day in court. That day will be Dec. 12, and the jurors, in a special election to replace Jeff Sessions in the U.S. Senate, will be the voters of Alabama.

Eating, drinking and merriment in Maine

The voters of Maine gave themselves a Christmas present last week, voting to expand Medicaid under Obamacare, and doing it by referendum to prevent Gov. Paul LePage, a Republican, from taking it away from them. The legislature had tried five times to give such a fine present to Maine voters, and five times Mr. LePage vetoed the present because he said Maine couldn't afford it.

Decades of useless climate parties

The climate warriors are holding yet another global warming jamboree, this time at the COP 23 Fiji UN Climate Change Conference in Bonn, Germany ("US at climate talks may be like unhappy dinner guest," Web, Nov. 9). We can expect an orchestrated flood of frightening forecasts to support their alarmist agenda.