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American Negotiations with North Korea Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Encouraging signs following Trump’s visit to Seoul

I was part of a small fact-finding delegation to South Korea immediately after President Trump’s Nov. 7-8 visit. The message we received in Seoul was universal: President Trump’s visit was a success; his presentation at the National Assembly was well-received. To a person, all were appreciative of the president’s comments, juxtaposing a vibrant liberal democracy in the South and an authoritarian and capricious regime in the North.

Illustration on cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Closing the cyber skills gap

In the digitally integrated world we live in today, it’s nearly impossible to function successfully in any industry without making cybersecurity staffing a priority. No matter the size, no matter the sector, businesses all across the country are in growing need of professionals who specialize in cybersecurity.

Illustration of Bill and Hillary Clinton by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A tale of two cultures

“Prospect of New Special Counsel Rattles Justice” was the scary front-page headline on a recent, worried edition of The Washington Post. The faux fuss was caused by Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ suggestion that after weighing recommendations from senior prosecutors, he might appoint a special counsel to investigate Hillary Clinton’s role in the Uranium One deal.

Map of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Nagorno Karabakh

Losing the moral compass over Nagorno-Karabakh

When it comes to American foreign aid, it is often the message — rather than the dollar figure — that matters. A textbook case is Nagorno-Karabakh, the internationally recognized Azerbaijani territory, illegally occupied by Armenia.

Senator Al Franken   Associated Press photo

Back to the future with Franken

- The Washington Times

It’s already begun. Liberal activists and pundits are arguing that Minnesota Sen. Al Franken’s documented piggishness toward women should be discounted, forgiven or perhaps even ignored given the fact that he is, well, one of them.

Hillary and Bill Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Who knew so much testosterone rides the capital breeze?

- The Washington Times

These are not happy times for anybody. You can’t keep up with the serial sexual offenders without a scorecard, and the list grows longer every day and all the claims won’t fit on one scorecard. Seekers of cash settlements are advised to not take checks, and hurry to the bank and get in line before the cash runs out.

No choice for China

If China doesn’t decide to intervene and essentially “denuclearize” North Korea — and soon — the Pacific region will “nuclearize” itself, in reaction to China’s inaction and the growing North Korean nuclear threat.

Trump Trade Policies Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump’s unwise economic nationalism

At the recent Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit, Presidents Trump and Xi Jinping offered competing and disturbing visions of a new international economic order.

Illustration on volunteerism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Crowding out compassion

Anyone who has ever seen footage of a “Black Friday” stampede knows the holiday season can bring out the worst in people. So it’s important to remember that it can also bring out the best — and to realize that government can inadvertently dampen our more compassionate impulses.

An ethanol plant stands next to a cornfield near Nevada, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File) **FILE**

Corn grows all too well in the swamp

Corn has taken root in the swamp that surrounds Congress. It has meant big bucks for Big Corn, but most everyone else is paying the price.

Conflict Between Oil Producers in Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perils of Saudi reform

In a dizzying sequence of events, Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman took a series of moves that will strengthen his status as heir to the throne and the face of his country’s future. These included a roundup of prominent royals, businessmen, and officials and the arrest of a major international Saudi businessman. At the same time, Saudi defense systems intercepted a missile fired at Riyadh from Yemen, the Lebanese prime minister resigned his post during a visit to Saudi Arabia, and another powerful Saudi prince died in a helicopter crash.

Illustration on new GOP wisdom on taxes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Stupid Party gets smart

Republicans have long been known as “the stupid party.” They do stupid things, like waiting until mid-November to pass a must-pass tax cut that should have been done by April.

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In this Friday, Oct. 27, 2017 photo, good samaritans of the town of Isabela make a circle of prayer with the residents of Rio Abajo in Utuado as recovery efforts from Hurricane Maria continue in Puerto Rico. (David Santiago/Miami Herald via AP)

The power of charity over government

- The Washington Times

TJX Companies, Inc., the corporate owners of Marshalls, T.J. Maxx and HomeGoods, announced just recently that even though its shops' doors have been closed for more than six weeks in hurricane-plagued Puerto Rico, all its employees will still be paid. This is how America rolls.

In this Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, file photo, former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney talks with reporters in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Mitt Romney blasts Roy Moore as 'unfit for office'

- The Washington Times

Former Massachusetts governor and failed president candidate Mitt Romney took opportunity to weigh in on the whole Roy Moore matter -- the one that finds him ensnarled in a web of allegations of sexual improprieties with underage and young girls -- and call for the former Alabama judge to immediately "step aside" and abandon his Senate aspirations. Maybe. But what's Romney's angle on weighing in?

IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR REDFIN - A Redfin real estate yard sign is pictured in front of a house in Seattle on Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017. (Stephen Brashear/AP Images for Redfin)

Searching for loopholes

Home is where the heart it is, but home is where there's a big hole in tax receipts. The home mortgage interest deduction, which enables mortgage holders to write off the interest payments on their properties, will subtract $1.3 trillion from the federal government's balance sheet over the course of the next decade.

National Space Council will meet Thursday. Government officials and entrepreneurs will be in attendance. The event will be livestreamed.
NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, in the middle of a Christmas Eve space walk, outside the International Space Station in 2013. (NASA)

High times and matrimony at NASA

Some marriages are said to be made in heaven, and now certain Democratic senators want to make sure that some marriages be recognized in space. Heaven can wait. These senators object to President Trump's nominee to be the administrator of NASA because he, like most Americans, thinks the ladies make the most appropriate brides.

China bigger threat than Cuba

The Trump administration has issued new restrictions on Americans visiting communist Cuba. Americans will not be allowed to do business with certain hotels, stores or other establishments that have ties to the Cuban military or security services. But why doesn't the Trump administration place the same types of sanctions on communist China? A lot of hotels, stores and other businesses are owned by the Chinese military and Communist Party there. Why the hypocrisy?

Building a mystery around law school debt

At the end of the author's note in this, his 39th novel, he tells readers that "The question all writers hate is: 'Where do you get your ideas?' But then he answers it -- "I read an article in the September 2014 edition of the Atlantic titled 'The Law School Scam.' It's a fine investigative piece by Paul Campos. By the end of it I was inspired and knew I had my next novel. Thank you, Mr. Campos."

Illustration on Iran's attacks on the Kurds in Iraq by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Smashing a critical American ally

On Oct. 16, Iranian-backed Shia militias, together with 9,000 Iraqi government forces, armed and trained by the U.S., invaded and took Kirkuk from the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga fighters.

Illustration on Veterans Day by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Honoring America's veterans

"Freedom or Death." That was the password issued by Gen. George Washington as he and the Colonial Army prepared to cross the Delaware River to unleash a surprise attack on the Hessian soldiers camped in Trenton, N.J. What was at stake that infamous day? The answer: the very freedom of our nation. The Colonial Army were our first veterans.

Illustration on the changing political demographic of the state of Virginia by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The slugfest in the Old Dominion

Virginia Republicans were licking their wounds this week after a humiliating election beating from the Democrats who swept every statewide elective office on the ballot.

Illustration on Mark Cuban by Linas Garsys/The WAshington Times

When disruption equals opportunity

Mark Cuban hinted to Harvey Levin on Sunday's "Objectified" that he is looking at running against President Trump in 2020 as a Republican, as he is fiercely "independent" and believes that there is a place in the GOP for someone who is "socially a centrist but fiscally conservative."

Deborah Simmons

SIMMONS: Be Veterans Day Strong!

- The Washington Times

The U.S. has been in Afghanistan for so long, a second generation and a third generation of "military brats" have joined the ranks. How do we count the ways to honor them?

Chicago White Sox catcher Carlton Fisk, left, chases Baltimore Orioles Al Bumbry toward first base after a dropped third strike in the first inning of Game 3 of the American League playoffs in Chicago, Oct. 7, 1983. Fisk tagged Bumbry out. (AP Photo/Bob Daugherty) **FILE**

LOVERRO: Orioles taught Bumbry a lot, Vietnam even more

Al Bumbry, like many who played in Baltimore, was brought up on the "Oriole Way," a philosophical approach to the craft of baseball that ran through the organization, particularly during the glory years. But it was in Vietnam that he learned about life and leadership.

On Nov. 11, 1989, East German border guards are seen through a gap in the Berlin Wall after demonstrators pulled down a segment of the wall at the Brandenburg Gate, Berlin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The day the Berlin Wall came crumbling down

What were you watching on Thursday, Nov. 9, 1989? For me, Nov. 9, 1989, was about watching the most significant political moment of my lifetime, the crashing down of the Iron Curtain and the fall of Russian Communism, on television from my home in rural Iowa.

From left: Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats testified before a hearing Wednesday of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. (Associated Press)

FBI counterterror chief, reportedly drunk, loses weapon

- The Washington Times

Robert Manson, a supervisor in the FBI's counterterrorism division, got drunk -- allegedly -- during a party with exotic dancers, better known as strippers, at a hotel in Charlotte, North Carolina, went to bed, woke up and found his service weapon missing. This isn't just embarrassing. It's downright dangerous to innocent Americans.

President Barack Obama, with Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker, center, and Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez, speaks during a meeting with members of his economic team in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, March 4, 2016. Obama spoke about U.S. employers adding 242,000 workers in February, driving another solid month for the resilient American job market. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Obama Foundation's newest director a tax haven hiding fat cat

- The Washington Times

One of the Obama Foundation's newest members of its board of directors is none other than Penny Pritzker, the Commerce Department secretary under the Barack Obama administration and the finance chair of Obama's 2008 campaign -- and oh yes, this too, a name that just surfaced in the Paradise Papers as tied to offshore tax havens. Well, would you look at that. One of anti-fat cat Obama's own foundation directors is an offshore tax haven sheltering fat catter.