Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

In this April 21, 2018, file photo, people watch a TV screen showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The signs read: "North Korea says it has suspended nuclear tests." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

A summit imperiled by Rocket Man’s travel tribulations

- The Washington Times

“Just getting there, as Cunard once boasted of transatlantic crossings by ship, “is half the fun.” The Atlantic is still there, but ocean liners are not, and almost the only way to cross the ocean sea now is by air. That’s no fun at all. Dining aboard an ocean liner has been replaced by dining aloft, and you’re lucky to get a pretzel or a stale cracker.

Illustration on the Syrian situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What’s next in Syria

Western civilization — in the guise of its three leading powers — struck back at international lawlessness when they hit Syrian chemical sites on April 13. It remains to be seen whether the strike had the desired effect of deterring the Syrian leadership from the further use of such weapons. If it does, President Trump’s claim of “mission accomplished” will be justified. That brings up the key question of “what next?” if chemical weapons use continues.

Unlocked from Poverty Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Unlocking America’s full potential

Thanks to tax reform, deregulation and America’s can-do spirit, our economy is strong. Unemployment is at its lowest level since 2000, wages are rising, and businesses are bringing jobs back to the United States. Despite these tremendous economic gains, we have yet to unlock America’s full potential.

Mike Pompeo. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democratic terror of a miracle in North Korea

- The Washington Times

Trying to spark a new romance, or even arrange a weekend tryst, is not always easy. It’s impossible with the help of spectators eager to throw things, not orange blossoms but sticks and stones with sharp edges. But that’s how Washington tries to conduct diplomacy, circa 2018.

Illustration on Taiwan's contributions to world health by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Taiwan must be seated at the World Health Assembly

The constitution of the World Health Organization (WHO) notes that “the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition.” Yet WHO withheld, as last year, an invitation for Taiwan’s participation in May as an observer in the annual World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva, Switzerland.

Sale of Unmanned Aerial Systems to Our Allies Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A win for America and its allies

Our allies and partners want to “buy American.” They know U.S. industries produce the most technologically sophisticated and effective defense systems in the world. When our allies and partners are better equipped to defend themselves, there is greater regional peace and stability — and far less need for American service members to be in harm’s way.

Like Trolls to the Flame Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making the patent system stronger

Appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee this week, the new director of the Patent and Trademark Office (PTO), Andrei Iancu, stressed his office’s focus on enhancing innovation through a strong, reliable and predictable patent ecosystem. All of us want a system that supports innovation by maximizing patent quality and minimizing patent granting mistakes. But how?

Illustration on fiscal responsibility and spending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Budget blame where it belongs

While tax cuts take the budget blame, spending does the debt damage. Proponents of big government spending are happy to stoke the latest story in the narrative that America is under-taxed.

Related Articles

Former FBI Director James Comey smiles during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Thursday, June 8, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Lanny Davis: I would've advised President Hillary to fire Comey

- The Washington Times

President Trump's dismissal of James Comey (based on the recommendation of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein) caused a firestorm in Washington and eventually triggered the naming appointment of Robert Mueller as Special Counsel to investigate allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russians to meddle in the 2016 election. But, according to a close Hillary Clinton confidante, had she won the election, she would have possibly fired Comey as well... and for the exact same reason.

Civil liberties lawyer and prominent liberal Alan Dershowitz on Monday blasted the left for its continued speculation about President Trump's mental stability. (Fox News)

Searching and seizing

'The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." — Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

Swamp Cannon Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The real threat to Trump

In the midst of worrying about North Korea, Syria and Democrats taking control of the House of Representatives this fall, President Donald Trump is now worrying about a government assault on his own business, which targeted his own lawyer.

Why Trump should stand by his tariffs

There will not be a trade war, if President Trump stands by his principles on the tariffs. Because Mr. Trump has already made America great again. And our trade adversaries and cheaters need us more than we need them.

Robert Mueller at the crossroads

Robert Mueller was appointed special counsel in May 2017 in reaction to a media still gripped by near hysteria over the inexplicable defeat of Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election.

Steering clear of climate alarm

Sunday, April 22 will mark the 48th anniversary of Earth Day. A lot of concern about the planet's future was generated back then and a passionate movement was launched that endures to this day.

Tax Day Harvest Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

For many, Tax Day will be a bit less gloomy

Federal income tax returns for 2017 must be postmarked or submitted electronically to the IRS by midnight April 17 this year — two days later than usual.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., announces to reporters he will not run for re-election and will retire next year at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The speaker exits

"Nice guys finish last" is part of the lore of baseball, an insight by Hall of Fame player and manager Leo Durocher, but it could be the epitaph for the Washington career of Paul Ryan, the speaker of the House who is widely praised for civility and good manners. He announced Wednesday that he's fed up and going home.

Soldiers can be atheists, too

Atheism is a non-belief in a god, while humanism is an ethical view ("Navy rejects 'non-theist' for chaplain corps; lawmakers warn against changing core mission," Web, March 27). Being a humanist chaplain would not mean, as some seem to believe, jumping at the chance to tell soldiers who believe in a deity that one does not exist.

Recognize Israel's right to Golan

As President Trump weighs a response to the latest deadly Syrian chemical-weapons attack on civilians, he should consider formally recognizing Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights ("Trump unleashes anger on 'Animal' Assad over apparent chemical attack in Syria," Web, April 8).

A president with failings of his own making

In terms of formal education and academic background, Woodrow Wilson ranks high -- perhaps at the top -- of any list of intellectual American presidents.

John Boehner's new, hypocritical marijuana money-making gig

- The Washington Times

John Boehner's got a new gig -- and it's tied to selling marijuana. How nice. Look at this headline from Quartz: "420,000 people were arrested for selling marijuana while John Boehner ran Congress. That speaks volumes, but can all be summed in a single word just the same: Hypocrite?

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill on Tuesday. (Associated Press)

Mark Zuckerberg's misguided turn toward AI to define 'hate speech'

- The Washington Times

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told members of Congress -- as well as a rapt TV audience -- that "hate speech" is tough to define, but within a few years, he expects artificial intelligence to assume a greater role in sifting the nuances of social media content on the company's pages and begin red-flagging and booting posts deemed hateful and hate-filled. This is hardly comforting.

In this March 20, 2018, file photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin pauses as he speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Will Paul Ryan challenge Trump in 2020?

- The Washington Times

Never Trump Republicans and establishments types in Washington have been pining for a White Knight to sweep in after the expected mid-term defeats this November to challenge Trump for the 2020 nomination. And Ryan appears to come right from central casting to play the part.