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Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Gropergate! The halls of Congress under siege!

- The Washington Times

When I was a young reporter on a certain newspaper in the South, fresh on a new job, I took a fancy to a sweet and pretty young woman (that’s how we talked in those days) working on what newspapers quaintly called “the Society pages.”

Why Trump should arm Ukraine

President Trump has often expressed his desire to build a better, more positive relationship with Russia. However, as Secretary of State Tillerson has said, improved bilateral relations will not be possible without ending Russia’s aggression against Ukraine.

Illustration on the restoration of the Alamo by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Restoring, reinforcing and remembering the Alamo

As a native Texan, as a veteran, and as Texas land commissioner, it is my solemn duty and my great honor to be the caretaker of the Alamo. Who we are as Texans started there and who we can be as Texans and Americans still lives there.

Illustration of George Papadopoulos by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Russian shadow

Thank goodness we live in a country where the people who represent us in Congress have the power to investigate and grill federal officials to root out wrongdoing in our government.

Illustration on Brett McGurk by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Following Obama’s footsteps toward Kurdistan’s destruction

Brett McGurk, an Obama appointee serving under President Trump, is working in order to ensure that the United States continues to follow Barack Obama’s failed Iraq policy even though the U.S. now has a Republican president.

United Nations U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley, right, listens as Organization of American States Secretary General Luis Almargo speaks during a U.N. meeting on human rights concerns in Venezuela, Monday Nov. 13, 2017, at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Nikki Haley quite rightly rocks U.N. boat on Venezuela

- The Washington Times

Human rights matter — that’s the message a resolute U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley just sent the Security Council’s way, reminding that Venezuela, land of the socialists, shouldn’t be allowed to skate on civil abuses. This is why Haley rocks. She’s unafraid to take the high ground on behalf of America, even when world players disapprove.

Illustration on the sexual vulgarization of the American culture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the cheap and dirty loses its punch

In the high-tech world of social media, where fake news thrives with the real, we’ve become a nation of voyeurs and eavesdroppers. Consuming the salacious is the guilty pleasure. We see and overhear a broad range of sordid comings and goings, what we used to describe quaintly as “dirty,” in the vocabularies that were once reserved for private conversations between close friends, too embarrassing for general discussion.

Illustration on CFPB by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The ‘Equifax’ threat to small-dollar loan customers

There are many flaws in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) small-dollar loan rule, which will deny millions of Americans access to a vital form of credit. One of the biggest problems, which has become an acute problem lately, is the security of consumers’ personal financial information.

When Republicans promise but don’t deliver

Voters in New Jersey and elsewhere just sent a message to President Trump and congressional Republicans: Deliver or expect to get replaced, and planned tax cuts will hardly be enough.

Illustration on a peace initiative in the form of an international research vessel for the South China Sea               The Washington Times

Using science diplomacy in the South China Sea

Despite White House efforts to deny well-established climate change reports and U.S. withdrawal from the 2015 Paris Climate Accord, most might question the wisdom of laying down a science — led peace-building plan in the contested South China Sea disputes. Yet science may prove to be the linchpin for bringing about cooperation rather than competition not only among the claimant nations in the region but also between Washington and Beijing. While President Trump’s recent offer to Vietnam’s President Tran Dai Quang to mediate the complex and challenging disputes over access to fish stocks, conservation of biodiversity and sovereignty claims caught many observers by surprise, it should not have.

Investigation into the Investigation Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

More Chronicles of Hillary

The Department of Justice will soon commence an investigation to determine whether there should be an investigation (you read that nonsense correctly) of a scandal involving the Clinton Foundation and a company called Uranium One. It appears that FBI decisions made during the time that Hillary Clinton was being investigated for espionage will also be investigated to see whether there should be an investigation to determine whether she was properly investigated. (Again, you read that nonsense correctly.)

In this Oct. 17, 2017, file photo, Army soldiers hone their long-distance marksmanship skills as they train at Fort Benning in Columbus, Ga. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Filling military quotas with the mentally ill

The Army very quietly announced in August that it will lift a ban on waivers allowing people with a history of mental health issues, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, to join their ranks. Even in normal times this should concern you greatly, let alone when the world appears to be preparing for war.

Illustration on the campaign against glyphosphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forcing taxpayers to fund anti-chemical activism

It’s bad enough when tax-exempt foundations and activist groups use junk science and scare campaigns to promote excessive regulations and set the stage for class action lawsuits against perfectly good products. It’s intolerable when our tax dollars directly finance U.S. and European Union government agencies that do likewise.

Illustration on the criminalization of government agencies by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The criminalization of America’s government agencies

The criminalization of government agencies by the Obama administration was far more extensive than previously realized. The Uranium One deal is a prime example of how key government agencies have been criminalized.

Related Articles

A goat, a baseball team and a curse

The 2017 baseball season has ended, and while there's no joy in Chicago, neither is there resignation. The Cubs didn't quite make it this year. But after 108 years of waiting, they won it all in 2016, and with another starting pitcher and help at middle relief, may well repeat in 2018.

Selective violence denouncement

When an African-American male shoots up a church in Tennessee, the news is swept under the rug. When an Islamic State terrorist mows down innocents, we are told not to rush to judgement. But when a white male shoots a church of Christians, Hollywood and the gun-control crowd pounce on the opportunity to judge America.

Cut waste for better tax plan

The Republican tax plan may provide relief for low-income families and the very wealthy, but people in the middle are going to be squeezed. The plan proposes eliminating deductions for medical expenses, adoption, replacement of property damage from disasters and student loan payments. New limits will be placed on deductions for retirement savings, mortgage interest, property tax and state and local income-tax payments. For many people, these are kitchen-table issues.

Former Presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush take swings at President Trump in a new book, breaking their pledge to not speak ill of their successors. (Associated Press/File)

Papa Bush and Shrub secretly furious about election 2016

In surprisingly undiplomatic terms for elder statesmen, George W. Bush and his father, George H.W. Bush, bash President Trump in a soon-to-be released book. While both of the former presidents vowed when they left office not to speak ill of their successors -- a pledge they've kept for the most part -- there's just something about Donald J. Trump that they can't stand.

In this Nov. 2, 2016, file photo, actor James Woods poses at the premiere of the film "Bleed for This" at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills, Calif. Woods said he is retiring from the entertainment industry. The news was included in a press release issued Friday, Oct. 6, 2017, by Woods' real estate agent offering Woods' Rhode Island lake house for sale. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

James Woods -- bam! Take that, Barack Obama

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama, in a tweet aimed at furthering his gun control designs, reacted to the horrific murders of Texas church-goers by calling for God to bring on gun control. Leave it to Hollywood's James Woods to slap back that silly.

Jennifer Palacios, center, the biological mother of 14-year-old Annabelle Pomeroy who died in a mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas, is comforted by, from left to right, her boyfriend Fritz Rymers, her son Timothy Rodriguez and her mother Diana Palacios, at a memorial service in Sutherland Springs, Monday, Nov. 6, 2017. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP)

Democrat Ted Lieu snubs Texas victims for pretend angst

- The Washington Times

The Democratic Party's Ted Lieu, lawmaker from California, said he was so upset at the recent shootings of Texas church-goers that he couldn't even stand to stay on the House floor to take part in the somber moment of silence. He walked out. That's right -- he took his sorry, grandstanding, self-aggrandizing self and left the floor, mid-moment of silence.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee member Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., questions witnesses Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis, during the committee's hearing on "The Authorizations for the Use of Military Force: Administration Perspective" on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Oct. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Jeff Flake's exit, stage right, includes shocking self-reflection

- The Washington Times

Sen. Jeff Flake, as everybody with even one eye on the political world knows, is leaving his seat at the end of his term, refusing to run for re-election. Why? 'Cause he can't win, that's why. But Flake's got a different view of that. And it's one that's firmly rooted in the world of delusion.

Illustration on the politics of police shootings ree a particular case in the Bronx by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Good cop, bad cop

Not even New York City's cop-hating mayor or New York's cop-hating governor could resist praising New York Police Department Officer Ryan Nash for shooting Islamic terrorist Sayfullo Saipov, as he emerged from his Home Depot-rented truck, after killing eight innocent victims and injuring 11 more, shouting "Allahu akbar!"

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., speaks as Facebook's General Counsel Colin Stretch, Twitter's Acting General Counsel Sean Edgett, and Google's Law Enforcement and Information Security Director Richard Salgado, testify during a Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, on more signs from tech companies of Russian election activity. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) ** FILE **

Never letting a massacre go to waste

- The Washington Times

Shooting up a church, even in a small town where a lot of people voted for Donald Trump, is a wicked thing to do. Everybody -- well, nearly everybody -- thinks so. But some people are determined not to let a convenient massacre go to waste.

Working Together to Feed the Hungry Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turning adversaries into allies

If U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is looking for a venue to bring the feuding American allies Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Bahrain and United Arab Emirates (UAE) under one umbrella, he should look no further than the recently launched Doha-based international organization called the Global Dryland Alliance (GDA).

What once was: Donna Brazile brandishes a Hillary Clinton campaign sign at the 2016 Democratic National Convention, 16 months before the publication of her new book "Hacked." It comes out Tuesday. (Associated Press)

What 'Hacks' reveals about Hillary

- The Washington Times

Donna Brazile's revealing look at what was going on within her beloved Democratic Party in the days leading up to Donald Trump's victory over party favorite Hillary Clinton last November has finally forced media pundits to realize that the hated Republicans aren't the only dysfunctional family in town.

Illustration on political cognitive dissonance by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Claiming entitlement to their own facts

On Nov. 4, a conference was held in London to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution, which occurred in October 1917. Rather than learn from the untold human misery which stemmed from that event, many of those who participated were celebrating the revolution or decrying it as incomplete.

24/7 Doctor App Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Teladoc doctor will see you now

If you're tired of the dysfunction in Washington -- the backbiting, the questioning of motives, the failure to agree on much of anything, the one-upmanship, the allegations about a "stolen" presidential election, Russian "collusion," the posturing and boorish behavior, how about focusing on something that is working and benefits a growing number of people?

Facebook Facilitates Fake News Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Close encounters with Facebook falsehoods

A year before fake news created in Russia was unleashed on the 2016 U.S. presidential election through social media, those of us in the Ukrainian government were warning Facebook about the likelihood that would happen. We have, sadly, become experts in fake news attacks.

Illustration on the centennial of the Bolshevik Revolution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Communism's century of devastation

President Franklin D. Roosevelt called Dec. 7, 1941 "a day that will live in infamy," and with good reason. The date that Tojo's Japan launched a surprise attack on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor heralded America's entrance into the bloody fighting of World War II. But there are other dates that live in infamy, and many of them aren't nearly as well known. But they deserve to be. Take Nov. 7, 1917.

FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2016 file photo Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., speaks during a ceremony on Capitol Hill in Washington. Reid and John Boehner are going to co-chair a new public policy think tank at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. MGM Resorts International and UNLV plan to bring plans for the institute headed by the retired U.S. Senate Democratic majority leader from Nevada and the former House Republican speaker from Ohio before Nevada university regents on Thursday, March 2, 2017.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Nuclear warfare

Dams are breaking all over town. Donna Brazile's new book, "Hacks," has broken the dam that has been holding back a flood of insider stuff about how the Democratic National Committee smoothed the way for Hillary Clinton to win the party's presidential nomination last year.