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Conflict Between Oil Producers in Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perils of Saudi reform

In a dizzying sequence of events, Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman took a series of moves that will strengthen his status as heir to the throne and the face of his country’s future. These included a roundup of prominent royals, businessmen, and officials and the arrest of a major international Saudi businessman. At the same time, Saudi defense systems intercepted a missile fired at Riyadh from Yemen, the Lebanese prime minister resigned his post during a visit to Saudi Arabia, and another powerful Saudi prince died in a helicopter crash.

Illustration on new GOP wisdom on taxes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Stupid Party gets smart

Republicans have long been known as “the stupid party.” They do stupid things, like waiting until mid-November to pass a must-pass tax cut that should have been done by April.

In this July 12, 2017 photo, Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn. arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington. The normally sleepy Senate Ethics Committee hasn't had a major case since 2011, but it could be deciding next year on the fate of three senators _ including two facing allegations of inappropriate sexual behavior. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A nation of moral geldings

Question: If the woman in the photo of Al Franken (where he’s groping her while she sleeps) would have given “consent,” then would this be right and good? If morality is really nothing more than mutual “consent” and Sen. Franken could prove that she said this was okay to do while she lay sleeping, he would have nothing — absolutely nothing — to be “ashamed” of. Right?

Illustration on U.S./Azerbaijan cooperation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Azerbaijan, an American partner

Azerbaijan has long been a partner of the United States. In the 26 years since we gained our independence, Azerbaijan has sought friendly relations with the United States. Formal bilateral relations were established with the sagacious efforts and diligence of the late president of Azerbaijan Heydar Aliyev and his American counterparts: U.S. Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton.

Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Gropergate! The halls of Congress under siege!

- The Washington Times

When I was a young reporter on a certain newspaper in the South, fresh on a new job, I took a fancy to a sweet and pretty young woman (that’s how we talked in those days) working on what newspapers quaintly called “the Society pages.”

Why Trump should arm Ukraine

President Trump has often expressed his desire to build a better, more positive relationship with Russia. However, as Secretary of State Tillerson has said, improved bilateral relations will not be possible without ending Russia’s aggression against Ukraine.

Illustration on the restoration of the Alamo by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Restoring, reinforcing and remembering the Alamo

As a native Texan, as a veteran, and as Texas land commissioner, it is my solemn duty and my great honor to be the caretaker of the Alamo. Who we are as Texans started there and who we can be as Texans and Americans still lives there.

Illustration of George Papadopoulos by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Russian shadow

Thank goodness we live in a country where the people who represent us in Congress have the power to investigate and grill federal officials to root out wrongdoing in our government.

Illustration on Brett McGurk by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Following Obama’s footsteps toward Kurdistan’s destruction

Brett McGurk, an Obama appointee serving under President Trump, is working in order to ensure that the United States continues to follow Barack Obama’s failed Iraq policy even though the U.S. now has a Republican president.

United Nations U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley, right, listens as Organization of American States Secretary General Luis Almargo speaks during a U.N. meeting on human rights concerns in Venezuela, Monday Nov. 13, 2017, at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Nikki Haley quite rightly rocks U.N. boat on Venezuela

- The Washington Times

Human rights matter — that’s the message a resolute U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley just sent the Security Council’s way, reminding that Venezuela, land of the socialists, shouldn’t be allowed to skate on civil abuses. This is why Haley rocks. She’s unafraid to take the high ground on behalf of America, even when world players disapprove.

Illustration on the sexual vulgarization of the American culture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the cheap and dirty loses its punch

In the high-tech world of social media, where fake news thrives with the real, we’ve become a nation of voyeurs and eavesdroppers. Consuming the salacious is the guilty pleasure. We see and overhear a broad range of sordid comings and goings, what we used to describe quaintly as “dirty,” in the vocabularies that were once reserved for private conversations between close friends, too embarrassing for general discussion.

Illustration on CFPB by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The ‘Equifax’ threat to small-dollar loan customers

There are many flaws in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) small-dollar loan rule, which will deny millions of Americans access to a vital form of credit. One of the biggest problems, which has become an acute problem lately, is the security of consumers’ personal financial information.

When Republicans promise but don’t deliver

Voters in New Jersey and elsewhere just sent a message to President Trump and congressional Republicans: Deliver or expect to get replaced, and planned tax cuts will hardly be enough.

Illustration on a peace initiative in the form of an international research vessel for the South China Sea               The Washington Times

Using science diplomacy in the South China Sea

Despite White House efforts to deny well-established climate change reports and U.S. withdrawal from the 2015 Paris Climate Accord, most might question the wisdom of laying down a science — led peace-building plan in the contested South China Sea disputes. Yet science may prove to be the linchpin for bringing about cooperation rather than competition not only among the claimant nations in the region but also between Washington and Beijing. While President Trump’s recent offer to Vietnam’s President Tran Dai Quang to mediate the complex and challenging disputes over access to fish stocks, conservation of biodiversity and sovereignty claims caught many observers by surprise, it should not have.

Related Articles

The sun sets behind 26 crosses placed in a field before a vigil for the victims of the First Baptist Church shooting Monday, Nov. 6, 2017, in Sutherland Springs, Texas. Texas officials confirmed Devin Patrick Kelley as the shooter who killed at least 26 people and wounded about 20 others at the church. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Devin Patrick Kelley, dead shooter, now accused of rape

- The Washington Times

Devin Patrick Kelley, the dead shooting suspect in the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs massacre, has now been named by four women as a rapist and sexual harasser. The more this story comes to light -- the more America learns about Kelley -- the more it becomes evident this guy just slipped through society's cracks.

Virginia Democratic Gov. elect Ralph Northam addresses supporters at the Northam For Governor election night party at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017. Northam defeated Republican Ed Gillespie. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Virginia: Ed Gillespie not a Donald Trump referendum

- The Washington Times

Ed Gillespie, Virginia's newest losing governor wanna-be -- who went down in flames to Democrat Ralph Northam -- will be talked about for days as the Voter Referendum on President Donald Trump. But his loss has less to do with Trump and more to do with Virginia's shifting demographics -- with Virginia's proximity to Big Government jobs.

A woman kneels in prayer at a makeshift memorial for the First Baptist Church shooting victims Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, in Sutherland Springs, Texas. A man opened fire inside the church in the small South Texas community on Sunday, killing more than two dozen and injuring others. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Mocking prayer after the massacre

We learn a lot about ourselves and others in the midst of a crisis. Hollywood and liberals had no problem revealing themselves for what they are (again) in the aftermath of the horror of the Texas church massacre. Liberals, these worshippers of failed big government, decided to condemn people of faith by mocking those who prayed on a day when 26 Christians were murdered.

Illustration on the need for patent examiners by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Protecting patents from unscrupulous trolls

The House Judiciary Committee met Tuesday to hear testimony on a patent deal between the drugmaker Allergan Plc and a Native American tribe. The deal has become a major scandal in the nation's communities of innovators.

Illustration on continuing bigotry by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Bigotry that's still in style

- The Washington Times

Chuck Morgan, who headed the American Civil Liberties Union Washington office in the early 1970s, was both a character and a good friend. Chuck hailed from Birmingham, Alabama, and was, of course, a graduate of the University of Alabama who gained notoriety as a staunch champion of civil rights at a time when standing up for blacks in Alabama was neither all that safe nor a career enhancer.

Illustration on the bin Laden diaries' revelations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Osama bin Laden's secret diary

On May 2, 2011, a Navy SEAL team made a brief stop in Abbottabad, Pakistan where they terminated Osama bin Laden's life and then moved on to their second mission: collecting as much information as possible from within the al Qaeda leader's compound.

Illustration on the Steele Dossier by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Democrats' dossier

In January, I wrote in these pages about the Democrats' dossier on Donald Trump. Much of what seemed likely about it at the time has since been confirmed. No surprise there. Hillary Clinton has confessed. But what is surprising is the general lack of appreciation for the significance of this sordid episode.

Illustration on moving to undo Obamacare by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending Obamacare, disregarding the law

In October, the Trump administration announced it plans to halt illegal federal subsidies paid to health insurers. Predictably, Democrats and liberal pundits alleged the move is reckless and will further undermine the Obamacare health insurance exchanges.

Mary Norwood, candidate for mayor, hugs a volunteer as she arrives at her headquarters on Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive to thank supporters and watch returns come in, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, in Atlanta.( Curtis Compton/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)

Why you shouldn't skip your school board election

On Nov. 7 thousands of elections took place, representing close to 40 percent of the U.S. population. From city council seats, to mayor positions in Atlanta, Boston and a half-dozen other cities, to the question of expanding Medicaid in Maine, the prices of prescription drugs in Ohio, and even whether New York should hold a constitutional convention, it was a busy and important day in American politics.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gestures as he delivers a speech at a tourism council in Ankara, Turkey, Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017. (Pool Photo via AP)

Rumbling in Ankara

Nostalgia is a powerful driver of emotions, whether for an old flame dreaming new dreams or for a new ruler of the remnants of empire remembering what once was, and what in his imagination could be again. But the regime of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (formerly prime minister) and his AKP Justice and Development Party is more and more authoritarian than romantic.

Children with banners reading "save the world" march between the delegates during the opening of the COP 23 Fiji UN Climate Change Conference in Bonn, Germany, Monday, Nov. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)

Theology, not science

As America goes, so goes the world. With the 2017 United Nations climate change conference getting underway in Germany, the world's most influential nation is split over whether it's a good idea to hamstring the economy just to lower the temperature a fraction of a degree (maybe). The smart money says the Trump administration's free market approach to climate policy is a better way than putting it into the hands of environmental theologians who are usually wrong.

A goat, a baseball team and a curse

The 2017 baseball season has ended, and while there's no joy in Chicago, neither is there resignation. The Cubs didn't quite make it this year. But after 108 years of waiting, they won it all in 2016, and with another starting pitcher and help at middle relief, may well repeat in 2018.

Selective violence denouncement

When an African-American male shoots up a church in Tennessee, the news is swept under the rug. When an Islamic State terrorist mows down innocents, we are told not to rush to judgement. But when a white male shoots a church of Christians, Hollywood and the gun-control crowd pounce on the opportunity to judge America.

Cut waste for better tax plan

The Republican tax plan may provide relief for low-income families and the very wealthy, but people in the middle are going to be squeezed. The plan proposes eliminating deductions for medical expenses, adoption, replacement of property damage from disasters and student loan payments. New limits will be placed on deductions for retirement savings, mortgage interest, property tax and state and local income-tax payments. For many people, these are kitchen-table issues.

Former Presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush take swings at President Trump in a new book, breaking their pledge to not speak ill of their successors. (Associated Press/File)

Papa Bush and Shrub secretly furious about election 2016

In surprisingly undiplomatic terms for elder statesmen, George W. Bush and his father, George H.W. Bush, bash President Trump in a soon-to-be released book. While both of the former presidents vowed when they left office not to speak ill of their successors -- a pledge they've kept for the most part -- there's just something about Donald J. Trump that they can't stand.