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Illustration on relations with Russia by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why relations with Russia are taut and strained

Hope is hard to see in current U.S.-Russia relations. Talk abounds of a second Cold War. The phrase, however, misunderstands history. The way forward with Russia is complex, but worth the effort. Peace may emerge from shades of gray.

Illustration on Gina Haspel's role in damaging the CIA by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fixing a weakened espionage brand

A group of former senior intelligence officials recently published a letter supporting Deputy CIA Director Gina Haspel as the nominee to be the next CIA director.

Illustration on infrastructure improvement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Getting to a U.S. infrastructure renaissance

If we are going to double our level of infrastructure investment, from 1.3 percent of GDP to something close to 3 percent, then we are going to have to look to the benefits of that investment.

Obama Holdovers in the Justice Department Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Stalled at DOJ because of ‘reefer madness’

By October of President Obama’s first term, Tom Perez had been confirmed by the Senate as assistant attorney general for Civil Rights at the Justice Department.

Thinking Differently Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A fresh wind in the Middle East

For decades Saudi leaders expressed in vituperative fashion an animus to the state of Israel as an illegal entity in what is assumed to be Arab land. While King Salman reaffirmed a steadfast position on the Palestinian issue and the legitimate rights of the Palestinian people to Jerusalem as their capital, he made an astonishing claim that the Jewish people have a right to a “nation state in at least part of their ancestral home.” On its face this may not seem as much, but based on commentary over the last 70 years this comment is extraordinary.

Illustration on copyright protection by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Copyrights and patents, piracy and theft

April 26 is World Intellectual Property Day — a day too little-noticed in most quarters but which shouldn’t be.

Illustration on tariffs and energy production by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the ‘America-First Offshore Energy Strategy’ could bottom out

President Trump has admirably prioritized America’s energy assets, declaring his administration’s goal of creating an era of American “energy dominance.” But as things stand today, the biggest obstacle to Mr. Trump’s vision is — spoiler alert — President Trump, thanks to his ill-conceived and hasty action to order a 25 percent tariff on imported steel products.

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A photo of Lieutenant Colonel Arnaud Beltrame placed on a bunch of flowers at the main gate of the Police headquarters in Carcassonne, France, Saturday, March 24, 2018, following an attack on a supermarket in Trebes in the south of the country on Friday. A French police officer who offered himself up to an Islamic extremist gunman in exchange for a hostage died of his injuries, raising the death toll in the attack to four, and the officer was honored Saturday as a national hero of "exceptional courage and selflessness." (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

France's futile hope to 'reform' Islam

- The Washington Times

So France, feeling the pinch and reeling from its umpteenth terror attack in recent times -- a police officer was just killed by a gunman who claimed ties to ISIS -- has now announced a new pitch to pacify the radicals of Islam and help integrate them into courteous society. Good luck with that.

In this Aug. 15, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump points to members of the media as he answers questions in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) ** FILE **

Trump is winning -- that's why the left is unraveling

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump rode into office on the wings, in part, of a promise to clean up the Deep State, drain the swamp and boot from places of influence those who've worked behind the scenes to undo America's greatness, one unconstitutional usurpation at a time. It must be working. How else to explain how nuts the left's been acting of late?

Chart to accompany Rahn article of April 17, 2108.

Problems in protecting intellectual property rights

Prague is a glorious city with many beautiful and historic buildings going back nearly a thousand years. It managed to escape almost all bombing during WWII, and thus was able to preserve the best of its past -- to the delight of both citizens and tourists. I am here at the European Resource Bank for a discussion of the problems in protecting intellectual property (more on that below).

Former FBI Director James Comey. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Still waiting for the garlic bullet

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump called James Comey a "slimeball," which is not a very presidential way to talk. But just this time we might have to forgive the president. James Comey really is a slimeball. Just about everybody says so.

ADVANCE FOR USE MONDAY, AUG. 21, 2017 AND THEREAFTER-A man shouts across the Wishkah River while incoherently talking to himself at Kurt Cobain Memorial Park in Aberdeen, Wash., Tuesday, June 13, 2017. Grays Harbor County lands near the top of all the lists no place wants to be on: drugs, alcohol, early death, child abuse, runaway rates of welfare that pull some out of poverty but trap others in a cycle of dependency. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Welfare reform again

When President Bill Clinton signed the welfare reform act in 1996, which he negotiated with House Speaker Newt Gingrich, the left claimed people would starve. They didn't. According to the nonpartisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, between 1996 and 2000, the employment rate for single mothers increased from 63 percent to 76 percent.

Arab Realignment Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iran, the Palestinians' seductive ally

Alliances between nations as well as between nations and non-state actors appear and disappear, pushed by the tides of history and geopolitics.

Illustration on John Bolton by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

America in good hands

Former U.N. Ambassador John Bolton is exceptionally qualified to serve as President Trump's National Security Adviser, and I fully support his selection. He has the right mix of expertise on the complex international security threats we face, the leadership experience to coordinate input from multiple federal departments and agencies involved in our national security policy and the strong communication skills to be a spokesman for the president on critical security matters.

Syria Strike Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Strike on Syria--who really won

President Trump and his national security team deserve high praise for their recent action in attacking Syrian chemical weapons facilities. They did everything right. Not only was it well-justified and timely, the president and his team did not rush into an attack but waited several days to evaluate the intelligence from various sources, develop attack options that met the president's specific objective, and form a coalition with key allies Great Britain and France for the strike.

In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, left, and Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., both members of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, GOP strategy session at the Capitol in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

A new Speaker

Paul Ryan shocked no one, at least no one who was paying attention, when last week he announced he would not seek re-election to the House of Representatives and would leave the Speaker's chair when his term is up in January.

Non-Dairy Cow Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Non-dairy milk, the next great oxymoron

Last week, the House of Representatives introduced its much-anticipated 2018 farm bill — and not a moment too soon. While the rest of the nation clawed its way to pre-recession productivity, the farm economy has suffered a prolonged five-year contraction.

Then-FBI Director Robert Mueller listens as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 13, 2013, as the House Judiciary Committee held an oversight hearing on the FBI. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

When anything goes

If Robert Mueller ever needs work, we would be happy to commend him to a school of journalism looking for a dean.

'Get-Trump' mentality widespread

Disdain for President Trump is worn as a badge of honor. It seems you can never display contempt for him too prominently. Mr. Trump was the Democrats' darling when his novel candidacy was the human wrecking ball in the Republican primary — and his nomination would have been God-sent if one were gullible enough to believe in God.

Tax could help smokers quit

As a cardiologist, I am pleased to see that the D.C. Council is considering raising the tax on cigarettes ("D.C. Council looks at adding $2 to cigarette packs sold in District," Web, April 9). Tobacco use is rampant in the District and is a leading cause of heart disease, stroke and death. Every day I treat patients who could have prevented their heart attack, stroke or other illness simply by never starting to use tobacco or by quitting.

'A commanding presence with a resolute manner'

At 49, writes John Greenya, Judge Neil Gorsuch had "a commanding presence with a resolute manner" as he testified before the committee. As Fox News' Charles Krauthammer put it, "This guy is out of central casting. This is a Gary Cooper character. Attacking him would be a losing proposition."

In this Feb. 6, 2018, photo, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., joined at right by Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., talks with reporters at the Capitol in Washington. Ryan is backing McCarthy as his successor. In an interview with NBC's "Meet the Press," Ryan says McCarthy is "the right person." "I think Kevin is the right guy to step up," Ryan says in the interview that will air Sunday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

A new Speaker

Paul Ryan shocked no one, at least no one who was paying attention, when last week he announced he would not seek re-election to the House of Representatives and would leave the Speaker's chair when his term is up in January.

Former FBI director James B. Comey Mr. Comey is on a book tour, with multiple media interviews, to promote, "Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership," an account of his time in the Trump administration. (Associated Press)

James Comey thinks it's normal to smash old cell phones with a hammer

- The Washington Times

James Comey thinks it's pretty normal for people to destroy their cell phones when they are done using them because "if it's resold, someone doesn't end up with your information." Um... how, exactly, does one sell a destroyed cell phone? Perhaps Comey meant that he thinks it's common for people to destroy their cell phones to ensure that they are not resold.

This Friday, June 30, 2017, file photo shows a librarian holding an expensive rare law book at the University of Virginia School of Law rare books collection in Charlottesville, Va. Nearly 200 years ago, Thomas Jefferson came up with a legal reading list for lawyers. Now, the University of Virginia is putting those books online. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Thomas Jefferson statue smearing as 'Racist + Rapist' despicable and revisionist

- The Washington Times

Thomas Jefferson was a complicated guy. So smearing his statue, as vandals just did, with the red painted words of "Racist + Rapist" at the University of Virginia, the college he actually founded, fails to take into account the complicated twists and turns of his beliefs, the pragmatic nature of his political leanings, the ultimate efforts he made to ban slavery from a significant portion of America.