Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Kim il-Sung    Associated Press photo

Billy Graham, preaching from the belly of the beast

- The Washington Times

Five of us from The Washington Times were invited to Pyongyang in April 1992 by Kim Il-Sung, the grandfather of Rocket Man. The man called “the Great Leader,” regarded as the founder of the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea, wanted to open his hermit kingdom to the world, and we were the first Western newspapermen to test whether North Korea could withstand a regiment of editors and reporters in their midst for 11 days.

Illustration on the goals and ideals of CPAC by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The significance of CPAC 2018

Inflection points in national dialogue and history are easy to miss. This week’s Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington, D.C., is one — it represents a key gathering, of key leaders, in a key year, on key issues. From 2018 election strategy and tax cuts to national security and gun rights, what gets said here matters to America’s future.

Illustration on stopping school shootings by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Stopping school shootings by arming teachers

When Donald Trump called for arming teachers in 2015, he was met with the expected derision from gun control advocates and other progressives. All proposals to arm teachers are met with similar derision by liberals who warn of the dangers of “militarizing” schools. While this chin dribbling continues, school shootings have increased to a point where 150,000 of our nation’s students have now experienced a school shooting or the threat of one.

No Takers for Puerto Rico's 4% Corporate Tax Rate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The failing tax haven of Puerto Rico

Until very recently, United States corporations were saddled with the highest tax rates in the world. Although the concept of economic growth spurred by tax cuts was previously successful in the U.S. under President John F. Kennedy in the 1960s and President Ronald Reagan in the 1980s, progressives in both parties seeking to find their own best ways to spend other people’s money steadily took both corporate and personal tax rates higher at different times.

Illustration on the fits and starts of economic recovery by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

A few bumps for the economy

Stocks on a roller coaster and surging inflation have just given policymakers and ordinary folks a jolt. Caution is always prudent but this is hardly time to panic.

FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 20, 2010 file photo, businessman Yevgeny Prigozhin, left, shows Russian President Vladimir Putin, around his factory which produces school means, outside St. Petersburg, Russia. One of those indicted in the Russia probe is a businessman with ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin. Prigozhin is an entrepreneur from St. Petersburg who's been dubbed "Putin's chef" by Russian media. His restaurants and catering businesses have hosted the Kremlin leader's dinners with foreign dignitaries. (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP, File)

The indictment of Russian operatives

President Trump’s attempts to convince Americans that Russia’s interference in the 2016 election was a giant “hoax” has taken a beating lately.

Electrical lines will be used for broadband Internet access as IBM Corp. partners with a smaller firm to improve access for rural areas not served by cable or DSL. They plan to work with local electric cooperatives. (Getty Images)

Breaking up the public broadcaster monopoly

The notion of a profound “digital divide” between urban and rural areas in America is hardly new. The real issue is what America should do about it — and whether the government or private sector should take the lead.

Phishing Moscow Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Mueller in hot pursuit

Last Friday, a federal grand jury sitting in Washington, D.C., indicted 13 Russian nationals and three Russian corporations for conspiracy and for using false instruments and computer hacking so as to influence the American presidential election in 2016. The indictment alleges a vast, organized and professional effort, funded by tens of millions of dollars, whereby Russian spies passed themselves off as Americans on the internet, on the telephone and even in person here in the U.S. to sow discord about Hillary Clinton and thereby assist in the election of Donald Trump.

Russia's Puppet Candidate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The great strategic deception

The underlying theme promoted by the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee (DNC), supported by the mainstream media, that there was collusion between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin to ensure a Hillary Clinton defeat, never made any strategic sense.

President Barack Obama laughs with Vice President Joe Biden during a ceremony in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) ** FILE **

Tracking the real collusion: Obama knew foreign entities were interfering; he did nothing

There is a lot of noise lately, and less signal, about the now debunked “Trump colluded with Russia” narrative. After special counsel Robert Mueller indicted 13 Russians for trolling Americans during the 2016 election, Democrats and various malcontents are in a tizzy to move their narrative goalposts. “Well,” they insist, “Trump said the whole Russian thing was a hoax. Now it’s proven it wasn’t,” or some such nonsense.

Nervous in North Africa

Officials in Morocco are apprehensive. “Africa is approaching a dangerous moment,” one of the Kingdom’s most senior political figures told me recently in Rabat. His bleak assessment, which I heard in virtually every meeting during my recent visit to the country, stems from what are essentially two factors.

Related Articles

Bipartisan Act Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Drowning in debt

In "Hamlet," Shakespeare pens one of the most familiar lines — and best advice — ever written. Before Laertes leaves for Paris, his father, Polonius, tells him: "Neither a borrower nor a lender be "

Illustration on infrastructure spending by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Funding infrastructure with 'MAGA Bonds'

President Trump in the campaign of 2016 and now as president has set forth the priority to build, repair and maintain America's crumbling infrastructure to the tune of $1 trillion.

Illustration on the opioid crisis in America by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping the promise of confronting the drug crisis

Wisely, the president is taking time selecting leaders for remaining senior posts, methodically vetting, setting expectations, assuring quality and loyalty. Among posts likely to be nominated early in 2018 — those that affect the nation's drug crisis. America needs that crisis leadership, now.

Poland and Immigration Policy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Separating myth from reality in Polish immigration policy

The European Commission has been highly critical of Poland in recent months. A major target of attack has been Poland's refusal of European demands that it allow Syrian and other Middle Eastern refugees to flood across its borders — a "rejection of European values" some have charged. We Poles see it differently. We want to separate myths from reality.

The official portraits of former President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama are displayed together following an official unveiling ceremony at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, Monday, Feb. 12, 2018, in Washington. Barack Obama's portrait was painted by artist Kehinde Wiley, and Michelle Obama's portrait was painted by artist Amy Sherald. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Painting a prickly president

Nobody likes to get his picture took. Vanity, thy name is woman. (Shakespeare's observation was actually written as "frailty," but good luck with correcting it now.) Vanity is a curse not restricted to the ladies. You need look no further than the White House for proof of that.

End Congress-pharma collusion

It is becoming more and more difficult to read media coverage of the skyrocketing cost of prescription medications. Just a little digging and research reveals the reason for this price surge: Congress has a law on the books that "prohibits" the government and Medicare from negotiating prices with major drug companies.

Stop Iran now

Last weekend, with the infiltration of a drone into Israeli airspace, we saw a blatant and provocative move from the Iranian regime. In response, Israel launched military strikes in Syria. For years now Iran has been expanding its tentacles in the Middle East, and it is only growing stronger.

Defending what is best in America

Roger Kimball, editor and publisher of The New Criterion, a monthly magazine named for The Criterion, a British literary magazine edited by T.S Eliot in the 1930s, is also the publisher of Encounter Books, which took its name from the literary magazine founded by Irving Kristol and Stephen Spender.

Illustration by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

Zoning out on free speech

"The Death of Free-Speech Zones," reads a recent headline in Inside Higher Education. It's a demise that anyone who believes in the First Amendment can cheer.

Former President Barack Obama, left, speaks at the unveiling ceremony for the Obama's official portraits at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, Monday, Feb. 12, 2018, in Washington. Obama's portrait was painted by Artist Kehinde Wiley, and Michelle Obama's portrait was painted by Artist Amy Sherald. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Barack Obama's portrait -- a real 'what is that!' moment

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama's official portrait unveiling just went forth at the National Portrait Gallery -- and boy, was it a WTFreak moment. Was that a giant fern in front of which Obama was seated? It reminded of his interview with Zach Galifianakis of "Funny or Die" fame and the "Between Two Ferns" chat.

From left, North Korea's nominal head of state Kim Yong Nam, South Koran President Moon Jae-in, his wife Kim Jung-sook, and Kim Yo Jong, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's sister, wave after a performance of North Korea's Samjiyon Orchestra at National Theater in Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, Feb. 11, 2018. A rare invitation to Pyongyang for South Korea's president marked Day Two of the North Korean Kim dynasty's southern road tour, part of an accelerating diplomatic thaw that included some Korean liquor over lunch and the shared joy of watching a "unified" Korea team play hockey at the Olympics. (Bee Jae-man/Yonhap via AP)

Media go ga-ga on North Korea in gag-me Olympic lovefest

- The Washington Times

It's not entirely unusual for the mainstream media to be slammed as little more than a mouthpiece for the left. But loving on the dictatorships? That's exactly what some seem to be doing, with all the heaping of praise that's been piled on Kim Jong-un's sister, who's attending the Olympics -- or, as The New York Times would put it, in this glaring headline: "Kim Jong-Un's Sister Turns On the Charm, Taking [Mike] Pence's Spotlight."

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg reacts to the welcome she receives before participating in a "fireside chat" in the Bruce M. Selya Appellate Courtroom at the Roger William University Law School on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, in Bristol, R.I. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)

Ginsburg: Election 2016 too 'macho' for Hillary to win

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton has spent most of her days, post-election, pining about her loss and blaming it on the deplorables who followed President Donald Trump -- the co-called sexist, misogynist atmosphere she perceives as marking her race to the White House. Well now, here comes Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, tossing the same gender card. And not for the first time, either.