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Illustration on the end of Net Neutrality regulations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Network neutrality comes to an end

They finally did it. After six months of debate, during which it received over 23 million public comments (of which half may have been fraudulent), the Federal Communications Commission voted on Dec. 14 to eliminate the network neutrality rules it imposed on broadband network operators during the Obama era.

Illustration on Hanukkah by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hanukkah, the first battle against transnationalism

Many think of Hanukkah as a fight for religious freedom. While religious freedom was at stake, it was part of a broader battle in behalf of the concept of national identity. The Maccabees, local Judeans who spearheaded the revolt against the overpowering northern Syrian Greeks, and who inspired the grass-roots, did so for the overarching cause of retaining Judea’s identity and Jewish character, which was under assault by those trying to denude Judea of its distinctiveness.

Illustration on global harmony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

People, planet and climate working together

Another year of weather is coming to a close. Even with some record-breaking snowfall from this past weekend’s storm in the eastern U.S., in many ways weather this year was not much different from any other year since the regular recording of temperature, precipitation and wind began across much of the globe 150 years ago.

Trump Administration Record on School Choice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping his promise about school choice

During the 2016 presidential campaign, candidate Donald Trump spoke passionately and often about school choice. Some school choice advocates, however, are beginning to rumble about the lack of progress on this key domestic policy promise. This grumbling has been building for some time among “talking heads” in the think-tank world.

Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off the stage with wife Kayla Moore after he spoke to supporters after an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala. Moore didn't concede the election to Democrat Doug Jones. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

What Roy Moore’s defeat portends

There were plenty of reasons why Republican Roy Moore’s defeat in the scandal-plagued Alabama election was a blessing for the GOP, despite losing a seat in a closely divided Senate.

Illustration on the GOP and the death penalty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Republicans reconsidering the death penalty

The mere idea of Republicans sponsoring death penalty repeal bills in great numbers was once considered an unlikely notion. However, Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty recently released a report revealing how Republicans are championing measures to end capital punishment at never-before-seen rates.

Doug Jones is greeted by a supporter before speaking during an election-night watch party Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. Jones has defeated Republican Roy Moore, a one-time GOP pariah who was embraced by the Republican Party and the president even after facing allegations of sexual impropriety. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Doug Jones — and Trump’s life just got a lot harder

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has been beating a dead horse in Congress for almost a year now, trying to pass his agendas legislatively through a Senate that’s dominated by Republicans yet consistently falls to Democratic Party will because of an ever-looming threat of filibuster. It’s only going to get tougher for Trump. Prepare for the stalled and even dropped legislation.

Illustration on Iranian influence in the Persian Gulf region by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s indirect strategy for regional influence

Last month, Yemen’s Houthis, the Iranian-supported rebel faction that now dominates the southern Persian Gulf’s most volatile state, fired a ballistic missile that came close to the Saudi capital, Riyadh, before being intercepted by the country’s military. The incident was a clear sign of the deepening sectarian conflict between Tehran and Riyadh now taking place throughout the Middle East. But it was also an accurate reflection of the sort of asymmetric tactics being prioritized by Iran in its strategy for regional dominance.

An open process for revamping net neutrality

While the pall of scandals and alleged scandals in the nation’s capital may have many voters thinking of the Beltway as a dysfunctional wasteland, the reality is that much of the machinery of government is, in fact, going full throttle trying to create jobs and spur growth. Only you wouldn’t know it from the daily news cycle.

Invisible Political Hand Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The invisible hand of economics

The invisible hand of American presidential politics is economics. Almost imperceptibly guiding the electorate, no other issue is as determinant of a presidency’s success. Currently, it is supporting Donald Trump through his political problems and could push him to re-election, as it has so many others.

In this Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson, file)

Drain the education swamp: College students’ tyrannical behavior must be stopped

How many conversations have we had with our friends, family and co-workers wondering what happened to the millennials? We expect a new generation to have new ideas and new ways of approaching the world. So how do we explain when a new generation is steeped in bullying, complaining about hurt feelings, demanding “safe spaces,” and using pride in fragile egos and weakened emotional states as the excuse to condemn free speech?

Illustration on China's role in diffusing the North Korean nuclear threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Nobody’s fool over North Korean nukes

Our news-hack kids — or, as Obama chief spinner Ben Rhodes called them, the “27-year-old know-nothings” — don’t have a clue as to the operative history of the North Korean nuclear threat to Asia, the Pacific and the United States.

Related Articles

Shutdown Schumer T-shirt Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Snookering the dealmaker

- The Washington Times

The coming government shutdown that at least some congressional leaders are working hard to avoid was predicted by many when President Trump sidestepped congressional Republicans to cut a deal with Democratic leaders last fall. The deal was celebrated in the media and elated a president desperate for good press, but left Republicans worrying about what the White House gave up for a few headlines.

Illustration on the troubles started by Hillary Clinton's claims of Russian interference by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Russia's influence spreads

Last week we discovered that former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn lied to the FBI about the import of what he told them regarding his contacts with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak. Yet Mr. Flynn once served as director of the Defense Intelligence Agency during the presidency of Barack Obama. Why would he lie to the FBI about what passed between him and Mr. Kislyak? Had he forgotten that, for a certitude, the conversation of a Russian ambassador was being recorded secretly by American intelligence agencies? Moreover, when he was being interviewed by the FBI, why did he not bring with him a lawyer? When I was being interviewed by the FBI about my perfidious Arkansas Project, I most certainly brought a lawyer with me, and it helped that my lawyer looked like he once worked for Don Corleone. Thinking back on it, I should have brought two lawyers.

Removing Obama Net Neutrality Regulations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Restoring a light touch to Internet regulations

Over the last two weeks, there has been a vigorous debate about internet regulation. Under the plan I recently proposed, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) would restore internet freedom by rolling back heavy-handed government regulations imposed during the Obama administration. Some have tried to whip Americans into a frenzy by making outlandish claims. Feeding the hysteria are silly accusations that the plan will "end the internet as we know it" or threaten American democracy itself.

Illustration on the danger of an EMP attack by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Death by stupidity?

America's epitaph may be: "Died of stupidity."

Illustration on Democrat objections to a tax cut by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A tax cut America can afford

Republican congressional leaders appear likely to pass tax reforms and cuts that the country needs and can afford — but whose benefits Democrats can hardly bear to face.

The Crony Castes of India Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When greed meets globalization

America's latest Clinton scandal — the 2010 sale of U.S. uranium to a Russian-controlled mining company, which allegedly benefited the Clinton Foundation to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars — has reminded me of the old proverb that says the love of money is the root of all kinds of evil.

FILE - In this Nov. 8, 2017 file photo, Vice President Mike Pence speaks in Floresville, Texas. Pence will be keynoting two days of Republican Governors Association meetings beginning Wednesday, Nov. 15, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

The Mike Pence puzzle

To the titans of wisdom, morality and politics (as a bunch of little guys of press and tube think of themselves), Mike Pence is a puzzlement. They just can't get a handle on the man.

In this Aug. 29, 2016 photo, Marilyn Smolenski uses a mock gun to demonstrate how to pull a handgun out of the concealed carry clothing she designs at her home in Park Ridge, Ill. Interest in clothing that allow women to carry a firearm concealed is rising. Pioneers in the industry say they allow women to avoid looking frumpy and still carry a firearm safely and effectively. (AP Photo/Tae-Gyun Kim)

Liberating good guys with guns

The right to self-defense is fundamental to a free people. So says the Second Amendment, and Americans hearing it loud and clear are the proud owners of guns enough to arm nearly every man, woman and child. When ne'er-do-wells turn their weapons against the innocent, it's responsibly armed citizens who must provide defense in the absence of the police. That's why rules that force concealed carry permit holders to leave their firearms at home when they travel are foolish rules. Congress must finish the job of empowering the good and responsible man and woman with a gun.

Real meaning of 'white Christmas'

There are two things we might want to think about this holiday season: a "white" Christmas and the coming of Santa Claus. A "white" Christmas is not about snow. It's about spiritual purity at the second coming of Jesus Christ, which Santa's coming represents. Santa's red clothing represents the blood Jesus shed for our sins, which only He can make "white." Where the Christmas favorite "Santa Claus is Coming to Town" says "He knows if you've been bad or good ... you better watch out," it's talking about our spiritual condition. God knows where we have all fallen short of His glory.

An unsettling tale of letting happiness slip by

One doesn't have to read very far into this novel to realize that Victor Forde, Mr. Doyle's unhappy protagonist, doesn't believe in much of anything, either. As he tells us in what may or may not be the words of a trustworthy narrator, Victor is -- was -- semi-famous throughout Ireland for two things.

Freed killer will just return

It is marvelous that killer and illegal alien Jose Zarate was not convicted of murder because, of course, his victim, Kate Steinle, was merely was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

In this Nov. 9, 2017, photo, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Nancy Pelosi's idea of 'Armageddon' is a GOP tax bill

- The Washington Times

Armageddon, biblically speaking, is the sign of the end of times -- the be-all and end-all of battles, the one that pits good against evil and ushers in a period of humanly devastations unlike any ever before experienced. But to Nancy Pelosi, the House's highest-ranking Democrat, Armageddon is the Republican tax bill.

People sleep outside of the Supreme Court in order to save places in line for Dec. 5 arguments in 'Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission,' Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, outside of the Supreme Court in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Supreme Court travel ban ruling a return to reason

- The Washington Times

Citizens from Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Chad -- terror hotspots, all -- and North Korea, as well as segments of Venezuela, are now barred from entering the United States, thanks to a Supreme Court ruling on President Donald Trump's executive attempt to secure the nation and stop the flow of potential terrorists across the borders. Finally, a court ruling with reason.

Colin Kaepernick attends the 2017 ACLU SoCal's Bill of Rights Dinner at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel on Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

Colin Kaepernick, bogus hero of the left

- The Washington Times

Colin Kaepernick is riding high, having just won the Sports Illustrated Muhammad Ali Legacy Award as well as the American Civil Liberties Union's Eason Monroe Courageous Advocate Award -- honors bestowed, respectively, for sportsmanship and bravery. But Kaepernick is possessed of neither. He's more a tool -- a tool of false leftist beliefs.

James Comey. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Robert Mueller's mighty tuna shrinks to a goldfish

- The Washington Times

Robert Mueller has the heart of a Las Vegas hooker and the guile of a New Orleans stripper. Not to push the metaphor too far, he's skilled at showing a little skin in a cloud of satin and lace, but never quite comes across with what the customer is paying for.

Bitcoin and Government Monopoly Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The end of government monopoly money

After two centuries of government monopoly money, private monies are re-emerging and will likely come to dominate ultimately. Back in 1976, Nobel Laureate F.A. Hayek published his little classic, "Denationalization of Money." In essence, Hayek argued that money is no different than other commodities, and it would be better supplied by competition among private issuers than by a government monopoly. His book detailed the problems with government monopoly money and how most of these problems could be overcome with private competition.

Illustration on reducing the size of government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Starving the beast

One way to kill a predatory animal is to deny it sustenance. The tax-cut bill passed by the Senate, if it clears a conference with the House and President Trump signs it, may be the first step toward starving the big-government beast.