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Former President Richard Nixon. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

An Olympian break in the war between the words

- The Washington Times

A few Ping-Pong balls broke the Cold War ice around China a generation ago, following Richard Nixon’s stunning trip to Beijing (when it was still called Peiping), and soon the United States and China were on their way to normal diplomatic relations.

Illustration on the recent nuclear alarm in Hawaii by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Hawaii error and liberal hysteria

Murphy’s Law was written to describe how governments work. It was proved yet again on January 13 when an employee of the Hawaii Emergency Management System sent a cellphone alert that said, “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” The alert was false but until it was corrected almost 40 minutes later it terrified millions of residents and tourists.

Illustration on protecting aborted babies delivered alive by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Giving the smallest patients equal protection under the law

Doctors today routinely diagnose and treat a myriad of conditions, illnesses and diseases suffered by society’s littlest patients — unborn babies and newborns — significantly enhancing both their health and longevity.

Illustration on GOP political dangers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When politicians exploit inequality

For Republicans, it’s dangerous to focus on the moment — accusations that President Trump is a racist, DACA and avoiding government shutdowns — but the more enduring threat to the GOP’s grip on power are charges of insensitivity about inequality.

Illustration on unintended Democrat sabotage of DACA legislation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The fate of the Dreamers

Donald Trump probably shouldn’t have suggested — not in public, at least — that Haiti and other nations that send refugees and immigrants to the United States are “s-holes.” It’s not only demeaning; it adds insult to injury.

Rep. John Culberson, Texas Republican, said, "The time is right" to consider a return to earmarks. He is pushing for a test run so Congress can prove it can be responsible. (Associated Press/File)

The trouble with earmarks

Nearly a year after President Trump was sworn into office on a campaign pledge to “drain the swamp,” he now wants Congress to reopen the spending spigots again.

Illustration on high tech's deleterious effects on commerce by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Big Tech chameleon

Twenty years ago, no one had heard of either Facebook or Google, neither of which existed yet. For that matter, no one knew much about social media or search engines in general.

"I'm not a racist. I'm the least racist person you will ever interview," said President Trump told reporters as he met with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, California Republican (left). The furor grew out of an immigration discussion at the White House on Thursday where Mr. Trump allegedly made vulgar comments. (Associated Press)

‘Trump’s a racist’ — Marcia, Marcia, Marcia

- The Washington Times

There comes a point when calling a spade a spatula becomes a bit worn and wearying and the public starts to catch on and actually notice and say, hey, that’s a spatula, not a spade. In other words: People start to doubt the message is actually true.

Taxpayer Money Lost in  Space Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The hidden fees of SpaceX

No one likes hidden fees. From unauthorized phone charges to home closing costs and prepaid card levies, they take a toll on low and middle-income Americans. To mitigate consumer outrage, members of Congress often demagogue unknown expenditures like ATM and airline baggage fees in committee hearings; costs which usually do not amount to more than a few dollars.

Uncle Sam Watching You Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The undoing of limited government

Late last week, Rep. Devin Nunes, California Republican, chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, repeated his public observations that members of the intelligence community — particularly the CIA, the NSA and the intelligence division of the FBI — are not trustworthy with the nation’s intelligence secrets. Because he has a security clearance at the “top secret” level and knows how others who have access to secrets have used and abused them, his allegations are extraordinary.

Illustration on China's dam building frenzy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China’s dam frenzy

China’s hyperactive dam building is a reminder that, while international attention remains on its recidivist activities in the South China Sea’s disputed waters, it is also focusing quietly on other waters — of rivers that originate in Chinese-controlled territory like Tibet and flow to other countries. No country in history has built more dams than China. In fact, China today boasts more dams than the rest of the world combined.

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Stopping an outrageous land grab

The Mississippi gopher frog (or the "dusky gopher frog" in official federal parlance) may soon get his 15 minutes of fame, but the frog deserves better than being a pawn in a case that pits an overreaching government agency against property owners.

Book jacket: "Supreme Injustice: Slavery in the Nation's Highest Court"

Grappling with unsettling truths about slavery

Only by ignoring the pervasive presence of slavery in 18th century America is there a cohesive founding narrative for the United States as a bulwark against tyranny and a place where government is based on the concept that "all men are created equal."

Illustration on auditing the Pentagon by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why a Pentagon audit is overdue

At the beginning December 2017, the comptroller of the Department of Defense (DoD) David Norquist announced that DoD would conduct its first ever audit.

Illustration on protectionism from Whirlpool by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trade and South Korea

For the second time in a month the International Trade Commission (ITC) has invoked a rarely used provision of the 1974 International Trade Act to protect a U.S.-based company from "unfair" competition from foreign suppliers -- in this case South Korean producers of large residential washing machines or LRWs.

Illustration on bulletproof windshield for Philadelphia police cruisers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Protecting 'blue lives'

The good news is that Philadelphia police officers will soon be patrolling the city's mean streets in 150 new patrol cars that have been equipped with bulletproof windows.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with lawmakers on immigration policy, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in Washington. From left, Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., Trump, Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump's new TV show -- genius at work

- The Washington Times

A Trump charm and, yes, intelligence lit up television screens all over America on Tuesday afternoon. Freed from the restraints and cautions of Bannonism, the president suddenly seems to soar like an eagle.

How 99 percent of 'Palestine refugees' are fake

In the words of a veteran Washington hand, the problem of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), the main U.N. agency dealing with Palestinians, is always important but never urgent. Well, it just became urgent.

Europe's silence

It's tempting to say that Europe's leaders lack the courage of their convictions. But that would imply that they have convictions. The evidence suggests those days are gone.

Pope Francis delivers his speech to diplomats accredited to the Holy See, during an audience for the traditional exchange of New Year greetings, in the Regia Hall at the Vatican, Monday, Jan. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini, Pool)

Pope Francis admits: Not all migrants good, not all border limits bad

- The Washington Times

Pope Francis made a somewhat eyebrow-raising remark the other day -- eyebrow-raising because it's such a 180 from his normal progressive talk -- and it's one that went like this: Not all migrants are in the migrant move for the job opportunities. They're not all honorable in intent. Some, he said, may have less than praiseworthy intentions.

Rancher Cliven Bundy, center, emerges Monday, Jan. 8, 2018, flanked by his wife, Carol Bundy, left, and attorney Bret Whipple, right, from the U.S. District Court building in Las Vegas. A judge in Las Vegas on Monday dismissed criminal charges against the Nevada rancher and his sons accused of leading an armed uprising against federal authorities in 2014. (AP Photo/Ken Ritter)

Cliven Bundy case highlights what Ronald Reagan warned

- The Washington Times

It was Ronald Reagan who famously warned of the dangers of government -- who said "the most terrifying words in the English language are, 'I'm from the government and I'm here to help.' " Now, more than three decades later, it's the Cliven Bundy family who underscores that sentiment.