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FILE - In this April 21, 2018 file photo, people watch a TV screen showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The signs read: "North Korea says it has suspended nuclear tests." North Korea's abrupt diplomatic outreach in recent months comes after a flurry of weapons tests that marked 2017, including the underground detonation of an alleged thermonuclear warhead and three launches of developmental ICBMs designed to strike the U.S. mainland. Inter-Korean dialogue resumed after Kim in his New Years speech proposed talks with the South to reduce animosities and for the North to participate in Februarys Winter Olympics in Pyongchang. North Korea sent hundreds of people to the games, including Kim's sister, who expressed her brother's desire to meet with Moon for a summit. South Korean officials later brokered a potential summit between Kim and Trump.  (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

A summit imperiled by Rocket Man’s travel tribulations

- The Washington Times

“Just getting there, as Cunard once boasted of transatlantic crossings by ship, “is half the fun.” The Atlantic is still there, but ocean liners are not, and almost the only way to cross the ocean sea now is by air. That’s no fun at all. Dining aboard an ocean liner has been replaced by dining aloft, and you’re lucky to get a pretzel or a stale cracker.

Illustration on the Syrian situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What’s next in Syria

Western civilization — in the guise of its three leading powers — struck back at international lawlessness when they hit Syrian chemical sites on April 13. It remains to be seen whether the strike had the desired effect of deterring the Syrian leadership from the further use of such weapons. If it does, President Trump’s claim of “mission accomplished” will be justified. That brings up the key question of “what next?” if chemical weapons use continues.

Mike Pompeo. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democratic terror of a miracle in North Korea

- The Washington Times

Trying to spark a new romance, or even arrange a weekend tryst, is not always easy. It’s impossible with the help of spectators eager to throw things, not orange blossoms but sticks and stones with sharp edges. But that’s how Washington tries to conduct diplomacy, circa 2018.

Illustration on Taiwan's contributions to world health by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Taiwan must be seated at the World Health Assembly

The constitution of the World Health Organization (WHO) notes that “the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition.” Yet WHO withheld, as last year, an invitation for Taiwan’s participation in May as an observer in the annual World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva, Switzerland.

Sale of Unmanned Aerial Systems to Our Allies Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A win for America and its allies

Our allies and partners want to “buy American.” They know U.S. industries produce the most technologically sophisticated and effective defense systems in the world. When our allies and partners are better equipped to defend themselves, there is greater regional peace and stability — and far less need for American service members to be in harm’s way.

Like Trolls to the Flame Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making the patent system stronger

Appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee this week, the new director of the Patent and Trademark Office (PTO), Andrei Iancu, stressed his office’s focus on enhancing innovation through a strong, reliable and predictable patent ecosystem. All of us want a system that supports innovation by maximizing patent quality and minimizing patent granting mistakes. But how?

Illustration on fiscal responsibility and spending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Budget blame where it belongs

While tax cuts take the budget blame, spending does the debt damage. Proponents of big government spending are happy to stoke the latest story in the narrative that America is under-taxed.

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Mark Zuckerberg, Robert Mueller's right-hand man

- The Washington Times

Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook, told members of the joint Senate meeting of the committees of Commerce, Science and Transportation and of Judiciary that yes, he is helping Robert Mueller with his special counsel business. Does anyone else find this a bit unsettling?

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, Iowa Republican (left) and Commerce Committee Chairman John Thune, South Dakota Republican, speak with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg after a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Tuesday about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (Associated Press)

Facebook's Big Dork vs. Congress' Dearth Panels

- The Washington Times

Every single one of these people in Congress expressing shock and condemnation over Facebook's sale of persuasion power to political entities already knew exactly what Facebook has been up to for years. Because each and every one of them has used those very tactics to get elected.

Illustration on Syria's role in middle-east peace by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What's at stake in Syria

Syria is a far-away land about which we know little. But we do know this: Over the past seven years, more than a half million people have been slaughtered there, with an estimated 150 murdered by chemical weapons just last weekend in a town outside Damascus.

Illustration of Larry Kudlow by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Larry Kudlow to the rescue

The markets are on edge. Yet, then again, inflation is low, employment is high — in the case of blacks and Latinos historically high — and growth is healthy and looking to become very healthy. Dare we say it, robust? The reason for the edginess in the markets is that President Donald Trump has imposed tariffs on Communist China and threatens to impose still more tariffs. There is talk of a trade war. That should worry any champion of free markets.

Illustration on the abundance of American shale oil resourses by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Energy security at home bolsters U.S. leadership abroad

With turmoil bubbling from nearly every corner of the world, our policymakers must be leaning forward. Every element of national power (diplomatic, informational, military and economic) must be synchronized to ensure U.S. global leadership on the international stage. To paraphrase President Teddy Roosevelt, a "big stick" is essential but let's try to keep it in reserve.

Illustration on balance in the Supreme Court by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Restoring common sense to the Supreme Court

President Trump can cut taxes, build the wall, rebuild the military, pull us out of disastrous agreements such as the Paris climate accord and the Iran nuclear deal, and he can make America great again in many ways. But nothing he does will transcend or outlive his impact on the U.S. Supreme Court, beginning with the service of Justice Neil Gorsuch.

Facebook Freeze Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Bring on the cyber apocalypse

Many "progressives" — particularly millennials — were horrified to learn that some Facebook data might have been used to help elect Donald Trump president. Conservatives understand that social media was used to elect both Mr. Trump in 2016 and Barack Obama in 2012. They can't blame me; I have been off the social media grid since early 2012. Actually, I was never truly on it. I briefly opened a Facebook account when my son was in Afghanistan so I could see pictures of his surroundings. I quickly closed it after I began getting friend invitations from people I didn't want to be friends with.

The Korean War Memorial in Washington,DC    The Washington Times photo

Remembering the 'forgotten'

As I read the obituary in the newspaper on March 29 citing the death of renowned sculptor Frank Gaylord, my thoughts drifted back to that day several years ago when I was first exposed to his work. Mr. Gaylord created the 19 statues that are depicted in what many regard as the most beautiful and haunting of all the war memorials in Washington, D.C.

Illustration on military preparedness and budgeting by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

An opportunity for defense savings

In Washington, one particular theme animates nearly every conversation about government spending: Sequestration and the "readiness" of the U.S. military. But with the budget agreement of early 2018, Pentagon spending was boosted by almost $150 billion over the next two years. Discussion has now shifted toward how this new budget will be spent.

Facebook censors Diamond & Silk

I recently saw an interview with Lynnette "Diamond" Hardaway and Rochelle "Silk" Richardson on FOX News. I've seen both conservative women in interviews before, telling the public their opinions while giving support to our president. I always cheer them on because considering the left's continuous assaults on everything President Trump says and does, it is refreshing to hear from people with common sense.

North Carolina worker-friendly

A recent ranking by Business Insider puts North Carolina in the top 10 states for wage growth in 2017, and it's clear why: Wages in the state grew at an average rate of 3.8 percent last year.

Riveting fiction by a former CIA field operative

Fans of intelligence fiction can take heart at a jacket blurb for Fred Rustmann's splendid new novel, "False Flag." Gene Poteat, a career CIA officer and president emeritus of the Association of Former Intelligence Officers, writes that the book will have readers doing "late-night page-turning to see how it all turns out and wondering, 'Did this really pass CIA censors?'"

Patrick Reed holds the championship trophy after winning the Masters golf tournament Sunday, April 8, 2018, in Augusta, Ga. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip) **FILE**

Patrick Reed's defense of Masters title starts early

- Associated Press

Patrick Reed won't have to wait until next April to defend his title in the Masters. Even as he slipped into a green jacket, he was perceived more as a villain than a victor.

This image released by Entertainment Studios shows Jason Clarke as Ted Kennedy in a scene from "Chappaquiddick." (Claire Folger/Entertainment Studios via AP)

'Chappaquiddick' perfectly captures Ted Kennedy's immoral soul

"'I'm not gonna' become president." That's the reaction of Edward M. "Teddy" Kennedy (played perfectly by actor Jason Clarke) in the new movie "Chappaquiddick," shortly after he drunkenly drives a car off a bridge into a shallow pond and leaves a young woman to die in a half-submerged car.

Lynnette "Diamond" Hardaway and Rochelle "Silk" Richardson talk about current topics on YouTube. (Image: Screen grab from the Viewers View YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yW7H8oE3tVU)

Zuckerberg's got some 'splainin' to do on Diamond And Silk censorship

- The Washington Times

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is headed to Capitol Hill to testify about some social media matters, and answer questions from Congress about privacy and election interference and such. Good. Maybe at the same time he can explain why his site's censor gods think the black pro-President Donald Trump duo Diamond And Silk are considered a danger to society.

John Bolton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Fear, loathing and John Bolton

- The Washington Times

If John Bolton frightens the nation's enemies half as much as he frightens Chicken Little and all the Democrats at home, all the strife, evil and deceit in the world will soon be history. Vladimir Putin and Kim Jong-un will lie down with the lion and not have to worry about being the midnight snack.