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When illegals use pilfered Social Security numbers

Last week, a House Ways and Means subcommittee heard testimony from the Social Security Administration acting commissioner about the widespread and ongoing theft of Social Security numbers (SSNs)from the American public. Despite its pervasiveness, the illegal alien side of the problem is rarely raised by the media or in Congress. Illegal immigration in general wasn’t mentioned at all during the May 17 hearing. And when the media does cover it, it’s commonly used as a rallying cry to support mass amnesty — the claim being that “illegal aliens pay into the system” and, therefore, “are as American as you and me.”

Illustration on Russia's history of state breaking by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s love affair with state-breaking

In Russia’s long-term war against the West that includes the infiltration of domestic political systems, blackmail and the indirect influence of elected officials through “ethnic political organizations,” one of its most prized and enduring tactics is its exploitation of ethnoreligious rivalries and fissures within the states along its borders.

This is a sign in a Starbucks located in downtown Pittsburgh on Saturday, March 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Fighting bias with business

Last month’s arrest of two black men at a Philadelphia Starbucks has amplified accusations of a double standard in American society. Along with a financial settlement with the men, Starbucks responded by promising to close its stores for part of May 29 in order to conduct racial-bias training for store employees.

Freedom from Big Government Energy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Shining a light on Big Power’s monopoly

You might have missed it amid the never-ending drama in Washington, D.C., but a war over energy production and rates rages in America’s heartland.

Illustration on USDA destruction of research kittens by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ending taxpayer-funded kitty cruelty

I am a cat person. Nothing against dogs or dog people. I like dogs, too. Growing up, my family always had both. But no one falls equally into both categories; everyone has a preference.

Satchel Paige. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Mr. Mueller’s fishing pole needs a rest

- The Washington Times

Satchel Paige, the legendary master of the sinking curve ball and famous doctor of philosophy, had a few wise words that Robert Mueller could use just now: “Don’t look back, something might be gaining on you.”

Rep. Donna Edwards, Maryland Democrat, said the bill passed by the House Wednesday would punish federal employees, and amounts to union-busing.

Donna Edwards has put ambition ahead of principle

- The Washington Times

When Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland retired two years ago, Rep. Donna Edwards gave up her safe Prince George’s County congressional seat to take on her House colleague, Montgomery County’s Chris Van Hollen, in the Democratic primary. Ms. Edwards lost by nearly 13 points, in part because a supportive outside group ran a negative and wildly inaccurate ad in the final weeks of the campaign that backfired on her.

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European Council President Donald Tusk, right, and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban participate in a media conference at the EU Council building in Brussels on Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban is visiting EU officials on Thursday to discuss the current migration crisis. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

A battle of wills over Polish courts exposes EU bullying

The European Union has long criticized its East European members — the former Soviet satellites Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic — for alleged "authoritarian" tendencies. The George Soros-backed, open-borders policy favored by Western European leaders has long been a sore point between East and West, with East European leaders refusing to admit millions of economic migrants from the Middle East and other world crisis spots whom they see as a threat to their security, culture and identity as a people.

Former FBI Director James Comey is sworn in during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Thursday, June 8, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Did Comey investigate veracity of Russian dossier as McCain expected?

- The Washington Times

It is now a full eighteen months since McCain handed the dossier to him with the full expectation that Comey would fully investigate the explosive materials. Did he? You'd think we'd know by now, considering the shadow of the dossier has hung over the Trump presidency since before it even began.

Former President Jimmy Carter signs copies of his new book "Faith: A Journey For All" Wednesday, April 11, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis) ** FILE **

Jimmy Carter, wrong on Donald Trump once again

- The Washington Times

Jimmy Carter has called out President Donald Trump as misguided for withdrawing America from the terrible Tehran nuke deal. That's expected; Carter's no Trump fan. But what's eyebrow-raising is the reason for Carter's scorn -- that history dictates Trump honor past presidents' actions. Wrong. On history, it seems, Carter knows not of what he speaks.

"Thank you to Rasmussen for the honest polling," President Trump tweeted. "Just hit 50%, which is higher than Cheatin' Obama at the same time in his Administration." (Associated Press)

Donald Trump vs. Barack Obama: Veni, vidi, vici

- The Washington Times

For eight years, the sane-minded of America suffered under a socialist-minded Barack Obama who scoffed law, mocked the Constitution and destroyed all that mattered on pretty near all matters tied to virtue, tradition, humble service and competent leadership. Now Donald Trump has come and with just over a year of leadership, has steadily and surely begun to repair what Obama broke.

Illustration on assumptions about Trump supporters by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'You might be a Trump voter if ...'

Aprogressive columnist finally let his mask slip this week and revealed the extreme liberal agenda for what it really is, a hate-filled and intolerant movement aimed at crushing anyone who dissents or gets in its way. Leonard Pitts is a columnist for the Miami Herald who has a syndicated column. His May 6 offering is a revealing look inside the mind of the far left in this country that many conservatives suspect exists, but its racial and anti-religious venom is seldom put into print.

Stormy Daniels (Associated Press)

Now arriving, porn feminism

We've entered the porn phase of feminism. You could call it the third stage. The first stage, led by Susan B. Anthony and the Suffragettes, wore white to proclaim their virtue and to show themselves morally superior to men who opposed them. They won the vote in 1920, despite President Woodrow Wilson's frown.

FILE - In this May 16, 2013 file photo, FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the Senate Appropriations, Commerce, Justice, Science subcommittee hearing on the fiscal 2014 budget request for the FBI. Mueller is nearing the end of his 12 years as head of the law enforcement agency that is conducting high-profile investigations of the Boston Marathon bombings, the attacks in Benghazi, Libya, that killed four Americans and leaks of classified government information. On Thursday, June 13, 2013, Mueller was to undergo questioning by the House Judiciary Committee on these and other issues in what will be his final appearance before the panel. His last day on the job is Sept. 4. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Prosecutors and the rule of law

Late last week, a federal judge in Alexandria, Va., questioned the authority of special counsel Robert Mueller to seek an indictment and pursue the prosecution of former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort for alleged financial crimes that, according to the indictment, began and ended well before Donald Trump ran for president.

Former Secretary of State John Kerry, who claims that "backing out" of the Iran deal undermines America's credibility around the world. (Associated Press/File)

One president at a time

Following the 2016 election, President Obama rightly warned the Trump transition team "we only have one president at a time." It was a reminder that there can be just one person articulating American foreign policy so world leaders will have no doubt as to the United States' intentions.

Harry S. Truman    Associated Press photo

Truman as a model for Donald Trump

When President Harry S. Truman left office in January 1953, most Americans were glad to see him go. Since the introduction of presidential approval ratings, Mr. Truman's 32 percent rating was the lowest for any departing president except for that of Richard Nixon, who 21 years later resigned amid the Watergate scandal.

Rock, Paper, Scissors Scalene Triangle Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Geopolitics in the Indo-Pacific

China's two main Asian rivals, Japan and India, are seeking to mend their relations with it at a time of greater unpredictability in U.S. policy under President Donald Trump's administration. This development carries significant implications for geopolitics in the Indo-Pacific region and could strengthen Chinese President Xi Jinping's hand just when he has made himself China's absolute ruler by dismantling the collective-leadership system that Deng Xiaoping helped institutionalize.

Illustration on physician-assisted suicide by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A flawed and dangerous law

It is no surprise to me that, a whole year after the District of Columbia enacted a law to allow assisted suicide, just two out of approximately 11,000 licensed D.C. physicians are willing to participate. On top of that only one hospital has cleared doctors to participate. The law allows patients with a prognosis of six months or less to be prescribed by a doctor a fatal dose of drugs to end their life. This law is flawed and dangerous for many reasons that would give anyone pause, but especially someone who has dedicated their life to healing.

Internet Service eShop Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the internet is out of reach

Broadband experts and community leaders around the country are discussing strategies to close the high-speed internet access divide that prevents many rural communities, consumers and small businesses from participating in the digital economy. But to meet this challenge — one of the greatest our country faces in the 21st century — Congress must resist efforts that would send internet rules back to the 1930s and curb much-needed investment in broadband infrastructure.

In this Saturday morning, May 21, 2011 file photo, Boy Scouts salute during a "camporee" in Sea Girt, N.J. The Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017 Boy Scouts of America announcement to admit girls throughout its ranks will transform what has been a mostly cordial relationship between the two iconic youth groups since the Girl Scouts of the USA was founded in 1912, two years after the Boy Scouts. (AP Photo/Mel Evans) FILE

When boys can't be boys

The Boy Scouts of America have been taught for more than a century to "Be Prepared." But the Scouts have never been prepared for this. Facing a long, steady decline in membership, since the men in charge opened the ranks to a variety of LGBTQ applicants, the organization is doubling down on what they did wrong. They're taking the Boy out of Boy Scouts.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo greets an unidentified North Korean general on arrival at the Pyonyang, North Korea airport on Wednesday, May 9, 2018.  (AP Photo/Matthew Lee, Pool)

A happy homecoming

Donald Trump diplomacy, which so offends delicate sensibilities in the United States and in the ministries of the West, nevertheless continues to pay rewards. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo comes home from North Korea on Thursday with three political prisoners released as a propaganda sweetener in advance of the president's talks with Kim Jong-un about suspending his nuclear weapons program.

Schneiderman gets just desserts

So the wheel of fate has turned on New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, Trump hater and supposed paragon of virtue ("Eric Schneiderman's stunning fall puts aggressive anti-Trump legal agenda in jeopardy," Web, May 8). It is poetic justice that Mr. Schneiderman's resignation under dubious circumstances is playing out in the national media.

A tribute to two Broadway pioneers

Here is a book for this season. Rich in facts and civility, it reveals a pair of American icons whose disciplined talent, creative purpose and literal harmonies still variously inspire, comfort and entertain us. "Something Wonderful" may help you keep your head when all about you are going berserk in today's maelstrom of ostentatious ignorance, partisan hostility and noise.

Make German seat permanent

Richard Grenell, the new U.S. ambassador to Germany, has said Germany should have joined the military strike of the "P3" group in Syria. P3 stands for "Permanent 3," the three permanent Western members of the U.N. Security Council: The U.S., the U.K. and France.