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Sen. Charles E. Schumer. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Democrats decree death in the swamp for the Dreamers

- The Washington Times

Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi and their Democratic followers laid a careful trap for their Republican tormentors, and then fell in it. The Republican leadership can keep them from climbing out if they’re smart and show a little courage.

In this Jan. 10, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump listens during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Fearful Dems preemptively strike State of Union

- The Washington Times

Democrats must be shaking in their Birkenstocks. How else to explain their many, many and many more preemptive strikes at President Donald Trump’s State of the Union speech — a speech that doesn’t even take place until Jan. 30?

Illustration on an alliance between Irael and Saudi Arabia by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A secret Middle East alliance

A Swiss newspaper, Basler Zeitung, reported recently that a secret alliance between Israel and Saudi Arabia aimed at restraining Iran’s imperial desire for a land mass between Tehran and the Mediterranean was moving into a new phase. While there aren’t formal diplomatic ties between the two countries, military cooperation does exist. In fact, the Saudi government sent a military delegation to Jerusalem several months ago to discuss Iran’s role as a destabilizing force in the region.

Perpetual Motion Money Machine Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing in a scorching market

Stocks have just accomplished a Houdini — scorching to record highs while escaping volatility. The S&P 500, which accounts for 80 percent of the value of publicly traded U.S. companies, just scored an unprecedented 14 consecutive monthly gains.

Illustration on supporting the Iranian uprising by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How to support the Iranian uprising

The current Iranian “man in the street” uprising provides the United States with a unique opportunity to achieve what should be one of our core vital national security objectives: the removal of the Iranian theocracy from power. Why? Because the Iranian theocracy has been at war with the United States for over 38 years. They have caused the death of thousands of Americans, both civilian and military.

Chart to accompany Emily Baker article of Jan. 16, 2018.

Small businesses and government contracts

With the sixth round of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) negotiations set to begin in Canada later this month, news reports claim that Canadian negotiators are increasingly worried that the U.S. may unilaterally quit the agreement — something that President Trump can do with the stroke of a pen.

A model has his hair cut as he waits backstage prior to the start of Versace men's Fall-Winter 2018-19 collection, that was presented in Milan, Italy, Saturday, Jan.13, 2018. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

The cosmetology cops

Few things could be more American than volunteering to help others. So it’s a shame when our altruism is thwarted by another, far more lamentable American trait: big government.

Influence of Tax Rates Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why taxes matter after all

One premise of modern-day “progressives,” is that taxes don’t have much influence on how much and when people invest, how much they work and save, or where they live. Just Google “Taxes don’t matter” and you will find scores of academic studies and news stories assuring us that taxes have little or no effect on behavior.

Unfair Trade Practices in Commercial Air Travel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trade cheating in the Middle East

Last month, President Trump laid out his foreign policy doctrine in a speech that emphasized economic security as a key piece of America’s national security policy. He called for “trade based on the principles of fairness and reciprocity” and “firm action against unfair trade practices.”

Illustration on New York's climate lawsuit by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

New York’s silly climate suit

On January 10, the city of New York filed suit against BP, Chevron, Conoco-Phillips, ExxonMobil and Royal Dutch Shell. The suit accuses oil companies of causing dangerous climate change and damage to New York City, seeking monetary compensation. But history will rank this action high in the annals of human superstition.

In this Oct. 18, 2017 photo, Collinsville High School Latin teacher James Stark speaks to students in his classroom in Collinsville, Ill. Stark views his students' well being as his top priority. Teaching Latin is somewhere down the list. Stark has been a teacher for three years. At 24 years old, he was named the 2017 Illinois Latin Teacher of the Year by the Illinois Classical Conference. His students say they think of Room 225, the Latin classroom, as a sanctuary. (Derik Holtmann /Belleville News-Democrat, via AP)

When student teachers are shunned

The Oklahoma Council for Public Affairs reports that a collective bargaining group representing public schools in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, is calling for a boycott of student teachers from the local Christian university. The reason for the proposed shunning? Oklahoma Wesleyan University’s president (yours truly) dared to suggest that the bad ideas presently being taught in our nation’s schools might, at least in part, be responsible for the bad behavior we are seeing in our national news.

Barry Goldwater campaigning in 1964. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The sorehead losers of 2016 suggest a familiar solution

- The Washington Times

President Trump goes in for his annual physical Friday, and the doctors will only look at things like his blood pressure, listen to his heart, bang on his knees with a little rubber mallet and turn him around for the ever-popular prostate exam.

Illustration on the need for a strategic approach to Iran by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why U.S. policy toward Iran must focus on strategy

President Obama’s abandonment of Iranians on the streets of Tehran in 2009 was not some random tactical mistake; it was strategic policy that sacrificed democracy in Iran in order to establish an economic and political partnership with the regime, eventually the Iran deal.

Illustration on the effects of Korean economic policy on international relations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why domestic politics matter globally

In a scenario few thought we would see again, we find ourselves anxiously observing a world leader with little more, but no less than, a catastrophically destructive military capability to threaten our allies near and far.

Related Articles

'Team' mentality wastes time

Today gives lesson to the warning of the Founding Fathers and George Washington's farewell address about the danger of factions (now known as political parties and caucuses). The Founders saw factions as oriented for dominance and power over other factions, which would result in public division, distraction from good governance and general public unhappiness.

When mother is a viper, and traditions are scorned

This is perhaps one of the most rare of the many books by Alexander McCall Smith in which his characters are not all well-meaning and kindly, and even more surprising he takes a swipe at the breed of feminists who despise men.

Trump Jr., Kushner bad for Trump

That the ubiquitous former Trump adviser Steve Bannon believes Donald Trump Jr. and Jared Kushner are idiots is hardly surprising. But they hardly redeem Bannon for his lack of character assessment in the Judge Roy Moore affair. Donald Trump Jr. and Kushner are silly, pompous nincompoops who are godsends to Saturday Night Live. They are a couple of empty Armani suits, overindulged by a president who should know better.

Illustration on problems with regulating the internet by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why consumers won't be left unprotected

On Dec. 14, the Federal Communications Commission adopted its Restoring internet Freedom Order (RIF Order) repealing public utility-like regulations imposed on internet service providers in 2015 by the Obama administration FCC.

Illustration on the potential for Iranian popular revolt against the current regime by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Eruption in Iran

The revolution that transformed Iran in 1979 was a grand experiment. From that moment on, Iran would be ruled by an ayatollah, a man with deep knowledge of Shariah, Islamic law. He would be the "supreme leader," a euphemism for dictator. He would merit that authority because he would be regarded, literally, as God's "representative on Earth."

Illustration on the North Korea threat of EMP attack by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Assessing the nation's vulnerabilities

President Trump's Dec. 18, 2017 National Security Strategy identified a top priority need to counter vulnerabilities of our critical infrastructure to "existential threats" from "electromagnetic attacks." He should urgently counter the existential electromagnetic pulse (EMP) threat that Kim Jong-un has identified as a "strategic goal." Note the Great Leader recently threatened to use the "nuclear button on his desk."

FILE - In this Oct. 17, 2017, file photo Steve Bannon, former strategist for President Donald Trump, speaks at a campaign rally for Arizona Senate candidate Kelli Ward in Scottsdale, Ariz. Ward is running against incumbent Republican Jeff Flake in next year's GOP primary. Some Republican Party leaders warn that conservative candidates with problematic track records like Danny Tarkanian in Nevada or Ward cant win general election battles and will lead the GOP to lose seats in 2018.  (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Are Bannon's Breitbart days numbered?

- The Washington Times

Following his criptic Tweet identifying Steve Bannon's new benfactor, enigmatic Chinese billionaire Guo Wengui, Matt Drudge followed up on Twitter with a personal and impassioned plea for a new direction at Breitbart News:

BOOK REVIEW: How Stalin treated his inner circle

What caused Joseph Stalin to become one of history's most notorious mass murders? Unlike Adolph Hitler, whose victims were anonymous Jews and other "undesirables" whom he did not know, Stalin's victims included persons from his inner circle, fellow leaders of the Soviet Communist party.

Steve Bannon is quoted extensively dishing dirt on President Trump and his family members in "Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House." (Associated Press/File)

Bannon stands alone

- The Washington Times

Steve Bannon - for one brief, glorious day - unified what had been a fractured, combative and disunified conservative media community (such as it is.) Since the rise of Donald Trump's candidacy in late 2015, the reporters, pundits and thought leaders have been bickering, sniping and debating with each other about the very future of our political movement and the ideological purity of the publications we work for.

Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver in this July 6, 2016, file photo. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) ** FILE **

Millennials, Gen Z depressed and sad -- boo freaking hoo

- The Washington Times

Survey says -- Millennials and Generation Z-ers are suffering from depression. Why? 'Cause they try so hard to be perfect and can't do it and that makes them sad. Apparently. Looks like the snowflakes are suffering from a solid case of what goes around, comes around. Living a life of "ME" doesn't seem all it's cracked up to be.

How Reagan and John Paul II outsmarted the evil empire

Someone picking up this book about the collapse of what Ronald Reagan so fittingly dubbed an "evil empire" might wonder about its subtitle: "The Extraordinary Untold Story of the 20th Century."

Say no to inaugural 'freebies'

"Corporate interests cut checks to fund governor's inaugural" (Web, Dec. 23) quotes a spokeswoman for Virginia Governor-elect Ralph Northam as saying that this month's inauguration is not a political event, but a celebration to bring all Virginians together — thus justifying large "donations" to the inaugural committee from corporate and business interests. This is absolute garbage.

Churchill saved the modern era

From my perspective of 80 years, "Darkest Hour" is the most important film ever made. It shows clearly why British Prime Minister Winston Churchill was Time's "Man of the Century." Against the opposition of the leaders of his own Conservative Party, the members of his Cabinet and the Labor and Liberal parties, Churchill refused to negotiate with Hitler after the surrender of the French — even with most of the British army trapped at Dunkirk. The film depicts the wonderful words Churchill used to win Parliament's consent to fight alone against Hitler.

Illustration on the North Korea threat of EMP attack by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Assessing the nation's vulnerabilities

President Trump's Dec. 18, 2017, National Security Strategy identified a top priority need to counter vulnerabilities of our critical infrastructure to "existential threats" from "electromagnetic attacks." He should urgently counter the existential electromagnetic pulse (EMP) threat that Kim Jong-un has identified as a "strategic goal." Note the Great Leader recently threatened to use the "nuclear button on his desk."