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Illustration on the upcoming meeting between President Trump and Kim Jong-un by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A just resolution of the North Korean conflict

President Donald Trump’s bold decision to accept the invitation of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un for a meeting was unprecedented. Although this will be the first meeting of a sitting president with a North Korean leader, it follows a series of temporary successes the U.S. has had with North Korea during the past 25 years.

Illustration on Russian directed assassinations abroad by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Russian intelligence and the long arm of vengeance

Moscow has a long history of murdering enemies of the state in far-off places. Those cooperating with the West, especially in the realm of intelligence, have been targeted for assassination since before World War II.

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Trump to Mohammed bin Salman: Focus on Iran

When Donald Trump meets with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the de facto ruler of Saudi Arabia, the president should have three clear and forceful messages for his reform-oriented guest: Focus your undivided attention to adopting a soft power approach to the Iranian regime, end the war in Yemen and lift your blockade of American ally Qatar.

Illustration on school choice fro military families by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Saluting school choice for military families

Americans who join the military know they’ll be making sacrifices. They put their lives on the line, obviously, but beyond that, they know they’ll have no say in where they live. Indeed, frequent moves are often part of the package.

A Muslim man wears a headband showing the Islamic State group's symbol. A lax legislative approach in some European countries makes it hard to prosecute returning militants. (Associated Press/File)

When ISIS fighters return home

What should not be an option is to treat returning terrorists with ever-greater levels of tolerance. Yet that is the option a number of Europeans advocate.

Illustration on Syrian strategic choices by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A mission quandary in Syria

Almost two weeks ago, after yet another incident of a chlorine gas attack by Syria’s Assad regime, Defense Secretary James Mattis warned both Syria and its Russian ally that using gas weapons against civilians or on the battlefield was very unwise. Last week, U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley was more blunt, warning that America is “prepared to act if we must” to stop indiscriminate bombings of civilians by the Assad regime.

Illustration on the legal and commercial rights of generic drug manufacturers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Big Pharma and its battle lines

- The Washington Times

It may be hard to believe, but some conservatives are arguing that any conservative who supports a measure before Congress called the CREATES Act that would allow generic drug makers under certain circumstances to go to court to get their competitors to play by the rules are ideological sellouts too willing to jump into bed with liberals and greedy trial lawyers.

Illustration on Betsy DeVos by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In defense of Betsy DeVos

Other than maybe the highly voluble William Bennett, Ronald Reagan’s second education chief (who still has a radio show), it is difficult to think of a U.S. Secretary of Education who has garnered as much attention as Betsy DeVos. But not in a good way. As exemplified by her much-lambasted interview on “60 Minutes” recently, from basically the day her nomination was announced she has been condemned as dangerous and unprepared for the job.

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Memphis head coach Tubby Smith reacts in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against Wichita State on Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Memphis, Tenn. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill) **FILE**

SNYDER: Madness not limited to basketball court this March

It happens every season as college basketball's big tournament approaches. Topics other than fantastic finishes are talked about at length and run into the ground. The NCAA's billions. The players' non-existent cut. The freshmen-to-NBA pipeline. The academic progress rates.

Illustration on the Oscars and #metoo by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Oscar has no penis, and everyone wants Oscar

Oscar has no penis. That was the startling revelation of Jimmy Kimmel in his opening monologue at the Academy Awards. This statue of limitations will be remembered for the attention Oscar got in 2018 for being neutered, which is not to be confused with being transgendered. Who knew?

In this June 21, 2017, file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed-door meeting in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

'Let him arrest me!'

Late Monday afternoon, we were treated to a series of bizarre interviews on nearly every major cable television channel except Fox when a colorful character named Sam Nunberg, a former personal and political aide to Donald Trump, took to the airwaves to denounce a grand jury subpoena he received compelling the production of documents and live testimony.

The CDC's Fight Against Disease Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How killer microbes endanger lives and jobs

Diseases know no borders. When disease outbreaks occur, they devastate communities and have the potential to kill thousands, if not millions, of people. Beyond the health and safety costs, however, outbreaks also disrupt trade and set back national economies. These secondary impacts, while less well understood, can multiply the damage caused by outbreaks here and abroad.

Illustration on the disruptive results of multi-lingualism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Stopping the drift toward multilingualism

Public opinion surveys in recent years show the large majority of Americans of all backgrounds and political persuasions support English as our official language of government.

Associated Press

New frontiers of gun control

Cops in Bonita Beach, Florida, are in hot pursuit of a bold and innovative robber who tried to hold up a 7-11 convenience store the other day with his finger. He made his getaway on a bicycle and the cops haven't yet found his hide-out.

The educator has no clothes

As befits a professor of economics at George Mason University, Bryan Caplan's writing style is economical.

FILE - In this April 14, 2016 file photo Rep. Dan Lipinski, D-Ill. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Lipinski will face Democratic candidate Marie Newman for the 3rd congressional district seat in the March 20, 2018 primary. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais File)

Blue dogs and mad dogs

There's an old story about the man who posted a classified ad in the newspaper about his missing dog: "LOST: Male dog, has one eye, mangled left ear, paralyzed hind leg, has been neutered. Answers to the name Lucky."

Drive 'progressive' media out

The left has a full-court press going on to do away with the right of Americans to own firearms of their own choosing. Well, the time has come to silence the "progressive" media outlets that have long provided cover for the felonies committed by Hillary Clinton, Bill Clinton, Eric Holder, Barack Obama, Lois Lerner and many others from the political left.

Free speech can't be 'zoned'

As a retired State University System of Florida faculty member, I applaud the Florida legislature for banning those ridiculous "free speech zones" and returning state public-university campuses to their longstanding and traditional role of providing the opportunity for students to explore the life of the mind.

A Texas Democrats sign hangs on a podium at a Democratic watch party following the Texas primary election, Tuesday, March 6, 2018, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Democrats' blue wave won't reach shore in Texas in 2018

Leading up to Tuesday's Texas primary, there were hundreds of blaring headlines about "Texas turning blue," the every-other-year political head-scratcher about a Democratic resurgence in the Lone Star State that gullible national reporters swallow and regurgitate.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders speaks during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, Monday, March 5, 2018. Sanders answered questions about President Donald Trump's tariff on steel and aluminum, China and other issues. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Sam Nunberg's supposed 'rough day'

- The Washington Times

Sam Nunberg told the Daily Caller in an exclusive that he's sorry for verbally unleashing on White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders and calling her, among other vile names, a "fat slob." His excuse? He was having a "rough day," he said. Well, with all due respect and all, but that's not really a "rough day." That's an inner beast leaking forth.

Oprah Winfrey attends The Museum of Modern Art's David Rockefeller Award Luncheon honoring Oprah Winfrey at the Ziegfeld Ballroom on Tuesday, March 6, 2018, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

The left always hates God -- until they don't

- The Washington Times

Stephen Colbert, late-night comedian, sat down with famed talker Oprah Winfrey and turned on the charm for God to make her run for the presidency in 2020. It was a mocking bit, no biggie for atheists but at least somewhat insulting for Christians. But the deeper takeaway is the hypocrisy it reveals of the left.

Stopping the Tariffs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Donald Trump and free trade

President Donald Trump has had a splendid first year in office. He has the economy moving again and at a healthy pace, 2.6 percent in the most recent quarter. Unemployment is down, the stock market is up and the economic signs are mostly healthy.

Illustration on strategies for the Ukraine crisis by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ukraine's hybrid war

Four years ago this week, Moscow launched its hybrid war against Ukraine and seized Crimea. Six weeks later, it began its not-so covert military operation in Donbas. One of the great, if unheralded stories of this war has been the largely successful effort of Ukraine to defend itself against this hybrid war in the east.