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Joe Louis. (National Portrait Gallery)

The septuagenarian smackdown

- The Washington Times

This won’t be “the thrilla in Manila,” or the “rumble in the jungle,” but “two clowns in a septuagenarian smackdown” should do more for the sweet science of boxing than anything since the two Joe Louis-Max Schmeling fights on the eve of World War II.

Illustration on advice for reforming the State Department by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Some advice for Mike Pompeo

Rex Tillerson was doomed from the start as secretary of State in attempting to transform the organization by making it leaner and more agile. Few would doubt that State badly needed some transformation to continue into the 21st century, but Mr. Tillerson chose the wrong model for reform and transformation. Mr. Tillerson’s designated successor, Mike Pompeo, would do well to consider some successful government transformational models that have worked.

The U.S.-Ukrainian strategic partnership

With Vladimir Putin’s recent declaration that Russia has developed very sophisticated hypersonic intercontinental missiles, he has not abandoned aggressive action at the lower spectrum of warfare. Russia’s apparent nerve agent attack in the U.K. is the latest and most brazen in a long list of hybrid warfare against Western democracies.

Illustration on the strategic importance of supporting the Kurds by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why America must help the Kurds in Syria

In recent days, the situation has deteriorated dramatically for the Kurds in Syria. According to Kurdish sources, more than 200,000 Kurds have been displaced within the past week and several hundred Kurds have been killed as Turkey and its Syrian allies take over Afrin.

More than a wake-up call for the GOP

The Pennsylvania 18th Congressional District was more than a wakeup call for House Republicans. Unless the GOP changes its posture on achieving fairness as well as growth in the economy and its relationship with President Trump, it’s doomed to a terrible shellacking in November — the kind Democrats endured in the midterm elections of 1994 and 2010.

In this Dec. 15, 2017, file photo, former Secretary of State and presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to the GirlsBuildLA Leadership Summit in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

A bitter Hillary Clinton strikes again

Hillary Clinton has not had a good week. In the aftermath of her trip to India and awful comments about Americans and women in particular, most of her allies and Democrats in general were explicit that it was time for her to leave the political arena. The shorter message from Democrats to Mrs. Clinton was “shut up and go away.”

Illustration on the upcoming meeting between President Trump and Kim Jong-un by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A just resolution of the North Korean conflict

President Donald Trump’s bold decision to accept the invitation of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un for a meeting was unprecedented. Although this will be the first meeting of a sitting president with a North Korean leader, it follows a series of temporary successes the U.S. has had with North Korea during the past 25 years.

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Illustration on the culture of diversity and tolerance by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Transgressing the diversity dictate

"All I know is what I read in the papers," Will Rogers used to say when opening his vaudeville act. In that spirit, here are two items in the news that shed light on our current culture.

China takes a wrong turn

Mao and his Chinese Communist Party ruled for 30 disastrous years beginning in 1949. Tens of millions were murdered, social chaos was constant, China was cut off from the world, and its underdeveloped economy stagnated.

Concealed Carry Classroom Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The facts about guns at school

President Trump thinks arming school staff and teachers deter threats. Surprise, media fact checkers from The New York Times to FactCheck.org accuse him of "false and misleading claims" to "inaccurate facts."

FILE - In this Jan. 14, 2016 file photo, runners make their way along a sidewalk on the campus of Wheaton College in Norton, Mass. Wheaton is getting a $10 million donation in 2018 from the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation, a conservative backer whose namesake is a Wheaton alumna. The gift will create an endowed professorship on social entrepreneurship and new space for existing programs on the topic. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

'Who are you to judge?'

"The Lottery" is a classic short story written by Shirley Jackson in 1948. It's the tale of a rural, farming community in America of about three hundred residents. The town seems normal by all accounts as it prepares for a traditional, harvest-time event known as The Lottery.

'Deathless' meat the answer?

Regardless of what one thinks of the sci-fi thought experiment of cruelty-free cannibalism, there really shouldn't be any debate over the benefits of growing real animal meat without animals ("'Soylent' Dawkins? Atheist mulls 'taboo against cannibalism' ending as lab-grown meat improves," Web, March 6).

Obama cronies not above law

We need a big push to make sure Obama-era officials are prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law for their attempts to thwart the efforts of Congress and the State Department inspector general to hold them accountable.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at Atlantic Aviation in Moon Township, Pa., Saturday, March 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A big week for the Donald

Donald Trump had a splendid, terrific, very good week by any president's standards. The economic news was stunning, with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reporting that 313,000 new jobs were created in February, the unemployment rate was unchanged at 4.1 percent, with inflation still at bay, and unemployment sank to record lows among blacks and Hispanics who needed such a week most.

Gangsters, the Cosa Nostra and New Jersey

New Jersey is unique as it is the only state in America that is home to several different Cosa Nostra organized crime families (called La Cosa Nostra by law enforcement).

This April 26, 2017, file photo shows the Twitter app on a mobile phone in Philadelphia. Russian agents on Twitter attempted to deflect bad news around President Trump's election campaign in October 2016 and refocused criticism on the mainstream media and the Clinton campaign, according to an exclusive AP analysis of an archive of deleted accounts. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

Trump's right -- of course he can Twitter-block obnoxious peeps

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump's private and personal Twitter account was just the topic of hot discussion in federal court because lawyers for plaintiffs who were blocked from his account say he doesn't have the right to do that. Umm -- no duh, but yes? Twitter's a private company; users can very well be private citizens, even Trump.

This combination of two file photos show U.S. President Donald Trump, left, speaking in the State Dining Room of the White House, in Washington on Feb. 26, 2018 and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un attending in the party congress in Pyongyang, North Korea on May 9, 2016. Trump has accepted an offer of a summit from the North Korean leader and will meet with Kim by May, a top South Korean official said Thursday, March 8, 2018, in a remarkable turnaround in relations between two historic adversaries. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Wong Maye-E, File)

Kim Jong-un's offer vs. his character

- The Washington Times

There's only one credible reason North Korea's murderous dictator Kim Jong-un would mean what he says about wanting to talk with President Trump about denuclearizing North Korea.

Illustration on health care insurance options by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A health care safety valve

With all the focus on short-term medical and other insurance options, it is easy to lose sight of what is driving some consumers to choose these plans over Obamacare — affordability.

Traitors, spies and Russia

An ever-present nightmare for an intelligence agency is the prospect of an enemy officer winnowing his or her way into a position where he or she can endanger operations.