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Opinion

Chuck Schumer. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Democrats in a lather over the good news

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama is miffed because he thinks he collected the tinder for a booming economy, and events ignited a booming economy and the Donald gets the credit. That’s pretty fanciful, as most economists will tell you. But now Mr. Obama can watch with a measure of pleasure as President Trump takes heat for using the Obama example of how to deal with the children brought by their families to the hell on the border.

Illustration on illegal immigration and drug trafficking by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Pushing drugs, flouting borders

Congress has declared an opioid crisis in the United States. We have voted on a slew of bills recently, but notably absent is any legislation that addresses the source of the problem. So while we spent billions for addiction treatment, and we granted the Food and Drug Administration more authority to regulate expired or unused drugs and impose packaging restrictions, we did nothing that will have a meaningful impact. Why?

Illustration on redaction and linguistic surgery for exonerating Hillary Clinton by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Scandals sanitized with linguistic trickery

Throughout Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz’s massive report on the Hillary Clinton email investigation are lots of strange things. One of the weirdest is the extent to which the FBI went to make up words and phrases to disguise reality.

Leverage and Hamas Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump and the centers of gravity

President Donald Trump, like everyone alive today, never met Prussian military theorist Carl Von Clausewitz, but the author of “Vom Kriege” (“On War”) would have found pleasant company with the man who inspired “The Art of the Deal.” For Clausewitz, war involved politics in addition to “other means” to arrive at a “deal”; in other words to obtain the objectives of a nation at war.

Illustration on Big Tech's lobbying by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The tyranny of Big Tech

In 2017, Google, Facebook, Twitter and Amazon collectively spent more than $40 million lobbying Washington politicians. While that may be commonplace in corporate America, big technology companies have used this money to reshape the inner workings of the Internet in America.

The FBI's J. Edgar Hoover Headquarters, across the street from the Justice Department in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

How to keep the Federal Bureau of Investigation independent

When President Donald Trump appointed Atlanta lawyer Christopher Wray to succeed James Comey as the director of the FBI, my initial reaction was not positive. Mr. Wray is a veteran of the Department of Justice and is part of that good-old-boy DOJ network that knows how to protect its own. Indeed, when New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a former U.S. attorney, needed a good criminal defense lawyer — whose millions in fees were paid by New Jersey taxpayers — he hired Mr. Wray.

Excavation sites at Jamestown, VA.   Photo courtesy of the authors

Unearthing American evolution in Jamestown

In “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” Dr. Indiana Jones famously said, “archeology is the search for fact, not truth.” Fact is something that cannot be changed while truth depends on a person’s perspectives and experience. At Historic Jamestowne we are fact finders unearthing a story from 400 years ago, when the Virginia Colony was establishing the foundation for today’s America.

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y., center, arrives to speak to a large group of protesters rally against the Senate Republican healthcare bill on the East Front of the Capitol Building in Washington, Wednesday, June 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Toward competition and cost constraints

Earlier this month, Michigan became the sixth state since 2015 to repeal its “prevailing wage” mandate, which requires that publicly funded construction projects pay wages determined by the government that are anything but “prevailing.”

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Elephant Stabbed Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Deconstructing young minds

Since November 2016, the deep state and its media allies have spent considerable time and money cultivating animus toward President Trump and the Republican-led Congress among younger voters.

Illustration on the ascendancy of al-Sadr by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

An Iraqi threat goes mainstream

Iraqi Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's rise to power has not yet reached its zenith. The May 18 Iraqi parliamentary election, in which his Sairun political block won a plurality, has elevated him to the position of de facto leader of the Iraqi nation. Mr. al-Sadr won't become prime minister because he didn't run for a parliamentary seat, but he will control the formation of the next Iraqi government.

International Space Station Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Preserving America's supremacy in space

Acquiescing to efforts to end government funding of the International Space Station (ISS) by 2025 would be a historic and costly mistake to the tune of billions, destroying an engineering, science and geopolitical marvel and elevating America's enemies to supremacy in space.

Chart to accompany Moore article of June 11, 2018.

Trump's economic boom

The left is quickly running out of excuses for why President Trump's economic policies have caused a boom — rather than the bust they predicted with such great certainty.

Illustration on "gay Christianity" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wolves in shepherd's clothing

A bit of news you may have missed over the past couple weeks was that of about 2,000 high-profile Christian pastors and church elders who, on May 24, marched on the White House.

President Donald Trump arrives at Paya Lebar Air Base for a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, Sunday, June 10, 2018, in Singapore. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

A crossroads at the summit

No politician owns the exclusive rights to "hope and change." As a campaign slogan, it worked well for a moment for Barack Obama, but in hindsight it was little more than an attractive but empty phrase. He wowed the world by signing the Iran Nuclear Deal, but left the terror-friendly regime in Tehran on course to complete a doomsday arsenal. President Trump, girding himself for a nuclear summit with North Korea, promises to deal only in the hard currency of reality.

Zero tolerance for filth

It is truly a national disgrace when tastelessness and moral depravity can pass for humor and the overriding residual focus is only on the reaction and response by two television networks.

What national intelligence is and is not

Regardless of whatever special counsel Robert Mueller III eventually reports, the 2016 presidential election has spawned enough conspiracy theories to surpass "Who Shot Kennedy?" on any list of supposedly unresolved mysteries, justified or not.

Colorado owes baker

Incredibly, the U.S. Supreme Court found in favor of a Christian baker who refused to bake a wedding cake for two gay men. What would the original court ruling have been if these gay men had tried to force a Muslim bakery to bake a wedding cake for their marriage? What would the Colorado court have done? I am sure they wouldn't have touched this issue.

Cars go by the scene Monday, March 19, 2018, near where a pedestrian was stuck by an Uber vehicle in autonomous mode late Sunday night in Tempe, Ariz. The vehicle was in autonomous mode with an operator behind the wheel when a woman walking outside of a crosswalk was hit. Uber suspended all of its self-driving testing Monday after what is believed to be the first fatal pedestrian crash involving the vehicles. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

The mad money rush to market self-driving cars

- The Washington Times

With self-driving vehicle technology, big bucks are on the line. And in the words of at least one mechanical engineering expert, the rush to produce -- the rush to profit -- is both real and dangerous. Truly, the real winner of this autonomous car race will be the one who forgoes the short-term IPOs for the longer-term of consumer confidence.

Amyx Hardware & Roofing Supplies in Grainger County, Tennessee, is making national headlines after posting a "No Gays Allowed" sign in the storefront window following the Supreme Court's ruling in favor of same-sex marriage. (WBIR)

'No Gays Allowed' sign gives Christianity a bad name

- The Washington Times

Dear Mr. Jeff Amyx: Tear down this sign. Amyx, a Baptist minister and the owner of a Tennessee hardware store, has reportedly decided to celebrate the Supreme Court's recent ruling regarding a cake baker who refused creative service to a gay couple by putting up this sign in the front window: "No Gays Allowed." He shoudn't.

When energy and commercial development clash

- The Washington Times

Hundred and perhaps thousands of Calvert, Charles and Prince George's County citizens in Maryland have been battling Dominion Power and state regulators to stop Dominion from building what's called a "compressor station" on the Charles County/Prince George's County line.