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In this Dec. 15, 2017, file photo, former Secretary of State and presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to the GirlsBuildLA Leadership Summit in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

A bitter Hillary Clinton strikes again

Hillary Clinton has not had a good week. In the aftermath of her trip to India and awful comments about Americans and women in particular, most of her allies and Democrats in general were explicit that it was time for her to leave the political arena. The shorter message from Democrats to Mrs. Clinton was “shut up and go away.”

Illustration on the upcoming meeting between President Trump and Kim Jong-un by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A just resolution of the North Korean conflict

President Donald Trump’s bold decision to accept the invitation of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un for a meeting was unprecedented. Although this will be the first meeting of a sitting president with a North Korean leader, it follows a series of temporary successes the U.S. has had with North Korea during the past 25 years.

Then-President Barack Obama on stage during a panel discussion as part of the White House Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) in the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) ** FILE **

Privacy pitfalls of AI-driven health care hard to ignore

- The Washington Times

Artificial intelligence may provide a world of convenience when it comes to suggesting which purchases an Amazon user might want to next make, or what song titles a Pandora listener might also enjoy clicking. But when it comes to AI in the health field, America should tread carefully. The pitfalls, particularly in the area of personal privacies, could very well outweigh the benefits.

Illustration on the positive consequences of mergers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why mergers make sense

Donald Trump is producing the kind of shoot-the-moon economic recovery that we last saw under Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. He’s copied a lot of the Reagan playbook: Deregulate, cut taxes, promote American energy. He should also think about adopting another Reaganite initiative: Let American companies, grow, merge, restructure and become more profitable so they can compete on the global stage.

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Trump to Mohammed bin Salman: Focus on Iran

When Donald Trump meets with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the de facto ruler of Saudi Arabia, the president should have three clear and forceful messages for his reform-oriented guest: Focus your undivided attention to adopting a soft power approach to the Iranian regime, end the war in Yemen and lift your blockade of American ally Qatar.

Illustration on school choice fro military families by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Saluting school choice for military families

Americans who join the military know they’ll be making sacrifices. They put their lives on the line, obviously, but beyond that, they know they’ll have no say in where they live. Indeed, frequent moves are often part of the package.

A Muslim man wears a headband showing the Islamic State group's symbol. A lax legislative approach in some European countries makes it hard to prosecute returning militants. (Associated Press/File)

When ISIS fighters return home

What should not be an option is to treat returning terrorists with ever-greater levels of tolerance. Yet that is the option a number of Europeans advocate.

Illustration on Syrian strategic choices by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A mission quandary in Syria

Almost two weeks ago, after yet another incident of a chlorine gas attack by Syria’s Assad regime, Defense Secretary James Mattis warned both Syria and its Russian ally that using gas weapons against civilians or on the battlefield was very unwise. Last week, U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley was more blunt, warning that America is “prepared to act if we must” to stop indiscriminate bombings of civilians by the Assad regime.

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In this April 24, 2017, file photo, corporate signage hangs at a McDonald's restaurant in downtown Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)

McDonald's flips 'M' to 'W' for weird nod at International Women's Day

- The Washington Times

McDonald's, apparently hoping to show women how much they care, has flipped its signature golden arches on all its digital channels from "M" to "W" in some sort of executive level hat tip to International Women's Day. That's "W" for women, not weird, or What The Freak, in case you're wondering. Guess it's better than handing out pink hats with female genitalia atop, a la Women's March style.

In this Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016, file photo, Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks during a product event in San Francisco. Pichai has declared artificial intelligence more important to humanity than fire or electricity. And yet the search giant is increasingly having to deal with messy people problems: from the need for human checkers to catch rogue YouTube posters and Russian bots to its efforts to house its burgeoning workforce in pricey Silicon Valley. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

Congressional donations from AI movers, shakers make lawmakers poor watchdogs

- The Washington Times

Early this year, Rep. John Delaney wrote a piece for TechCrunch.com pressing for Congress to get serious about artificial intelligence and take "proactive" steps to make sure this fast-moving technology industry is "good for working people, good for businesses and good for our economy and that it's implemented in an ethical way," he said. He might have mentioned the money ties his fellow Artificial Intelligence Caucus members would stand to gain in the process.

Memphis head coach Tubby Smith reacts in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against Wichita State on Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Memphis, Tenn. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill) **FILE**

SNYDER: Madness not limited to basketball court this March

It happens every season as college basketball's big tournament approaches. Topics other than fantastic finishes are talked about at length and run into the ground. The NCAA's billions. The players' non-existent cut. The freshmen-to-NBA pipeline. The academic progress rates.

Illustration on the Oscars and #metoo by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Oscar has no penis, and everyone wants Oscar

Oscar has no penis. That was the startling revelation of Jimmy Kimmel in his opening monologue at the Academy Awards. This statue of limitations will be remembered for the attention Oscar got in 2018 for being neutered, which is not to be confused with being transgendered. Who knew?

In this June 21, 2017, file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed-door meeting in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

'Let him arrest me!'

Late Monday afternoon, we were treated to a series of bizarre interviews on nearly every major cable television channel except Fox when a colorful character named Sam Nunberg, a former personal and political aide to Donald Trump, took to the airwaves to denounce a grand jury subpoena he received compelling the production of documents and live testimony.

The CDC's Fight Against Disease Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How killer microbes endanger lives and jobs

Diseases know no borders. When disease outbreaks occur, they devastate communities and have the potential to kill thousands, if not millions, of people. Beyond the health and safety costs, however, outbreaks also disrupt trade and set back national economies. These secondary impacts, while less well understood, can multiply the damage caused by outbreaks here and abroad.

Illustration on the disruptive results of multi-lingualism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Stopping the drift toward multilingualism

Public opinion surveys in recent years show the large majority of Americans of all backgrounds and political persuasions support English as our official language of government.

Associated Press

New frontiers of gun control

Cops in Bonita Beach, Florida, are in hot pursuit of a bold and innovative robber who tried to hold up a 7-11 convenience store the other day with his finger. He made his getaway on a bicycle and the cops haven't yet found his hide-out.

The educator has no clothes

As befits a professor of economics at George Mason University, Bryan Caplan's writing style is economical.

FILE - In this April 14, 2016 file photo Rep. Dan Lipinski, D-Ill. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Lipinski will face Democratic candidate Marie Newman for the 3rd congressional district seat in the March 20, 2018 primary. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais File)

Blue dogs and mad dogs

There's an old story about the man who posted a classified ad in the newspaper about his missing dog: "LOST: Male dog, has one eye, mangled left ear, paralyzed hind leg, has been neutered. Answers to the name Lucky."

Drive 'progressive' media out

The left has a full-court press going on to do away with the right of Americans to own firearms of their own choosing. Well, the time has come to silence the "progressive" media outlets that have long provided cover for the felonies committed by Hillary Clinton, Bill Clinton, Eric Holder, Barack Obama, Lois Lerner and many others from the political left.

Free speech can't be 'zoned'

As a retired State University System of Florida faculty member, I applaud the Florida legislature for banning those ridiculous "free speech zones" and returning state public-university campuses to their longstanding and traditional role of providing the opportunity for students to explore the life of the mind.

A Texas Democrats sign hangs on a podium at a Democratic watch party following the Texas primary election, Tuesday, March 6, 2018, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Democrats' blue wave won't reach shore in Texas in 2018

Leading up to Tuesday's Texas primary, there were hundreds of blaring headlines about "Texas turning blue," the every-other-year political head-scratcher about a Democratic resurgence in the Lone Star State that gullible national reporters swallow and regurgitate.