Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on high tech's deleterious effects on commerce by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Big Tech chameleon

Twenty years ago, no one had heard of either Facebook or Google, neither of which existed yet. For that matter, no one knew much about social media or search engines in general.

"I'm not a racist. I'm the least racist person you will ever interview," said President Trump told reporters as he met with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, California Republican (left). The furor grew out of an immigration discussion at the White House on Thursday where Mr. Trump allegedly made vulgar comments. (Associated Press)

‘Trump’s a racist’ — Marcia, Marcia, Marcia

- The Washington Times

There comes a point when calling a spade a spatula becomes a bit worn and wearying and the public starts to catch on and actually notice and say, hey, that’s a spatula, not a spade. In other words: People start to doubt the message is actually true.

Taxpayer Money Lost in  Space Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The hidden fees of SpaceX

No one likes hidden fees. From unauthorized phone charges to home closing costs and prepaid card levies, they take a toll on low and middle-income Americans. To mitigate consumer outrage, members of Congress often demagogue unknown expenditures like ATM and airline baggage fees in committee hearings; costs which usually do not amount to more than a few dollars.

Uncle Sam Watching You Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The undoing of limited government

Late last week, Rep. Devin Nunes, California Republican, chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, repeated his public observations that members of the intelligence community — particularly the CIA, the NSA and the intelligence division of the FBI — are not trustworthy with the nation’s intelligence secrets. Because he has a security clearance at the “top secret” level and knows how others who have access to secrets have used and abused them, his allegations are extraordinary.

Illustration on China's dam building frenzy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China’s dam frenzy

China’s hyperactive dam building is a reminder that, while international attention remains on its recidivist activities in the South China Sea’s disputed waters, it is also focusing quietly on other waters — of rivers that originate in Chinese-controlled territory like Tibet and flow to other countries. No country in history has built more dams than China. In fact, China today boasts more dams than the rest of the world combined.

Illustration on lowering veterans' suicide rates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lowering the suicide rates of those who serve

President Donald Trump last week signed an executive order which seeks to lower suicides rates among our nation’s veterans. The order, which would take effect in March, expands mental health services for transitioning veterans upon their return home to civilian life. Mr. Trump hailed the order as a “historic step to make sure that our incredible veterans are taken care of in a proper manner.”

FISA: A Rubber Stamp to Break the Law Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Institutionalizing Watergate

The “third rate burglary” of the Democratic National Committee’s offices at the Watergate hotel in 1972 was meant to spy on the Democratic presidential campaign. Now we’re beginning to understand how a Democratic administration pried into the 2016 Republican Campaign with the assistance of the CIA, the FBI, and the Department of Justice. The Democratic Party’s media wing tries to cover the spying and pretends that it uncovered dirt.

A supporter of President Donald Trump challenges police officers and a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program during a rally outside the office of California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

Nightmare for Dreamers

DACA, “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals,” is an Obama pen-and-phone program, not one created by legislation. It was simply a policy announced by President Obama on June 15, 2013. The date was chosen because it was the 30th anniversary of Plyler v. Doe, a Supreme Court decision that barred public schools from charging illegal immigrant children tuition.

A pair of postal workers shovel the lot at the Plainville, Mass., Post Office Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018. The post office was open for business as usual.  (Mark Stockwell/The Sun Chronicle via AP)

Another view of the U.S. Postal Service

Along with political coverage and analysis generally regarded as top-flight, The Washington Times apparently also possesses a good sense of humor.

Sen. Charles E. Schumer. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Democrats decree death in the swamp for the Dreamers

- The Washington Times

Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi and their Democratic followers laid a careful trap for their Republican tormentors, and then fell in it. The Republican leadership can keep them from climbing out if they’re smart and show a little courage.

Related Articles

This image released by NBC shows Oprah Winfrey accepting the Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 75th Annual Golden Globe Awards in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018. (Paul Drinkwater/NBC via AP)

Oprah speech powerful, but not presidential

- The Washington Times

Oprah Winfrey gave a good speech at the Golden Globes -- a rousing, pertinent, timely and even touching speech. But that's not the same as saying it was presidential. And it's certainly not the same as accepting Winfrey herself would made a good presidential candidate.

Conservative author Ann Coulter (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Coulter on DACA: Deport DREAMers first!

- The Washington Times

Ann Coulter is a little leery of all the talk in DC about President Trump working out a deal with Chuck and Nancy over a legislative solution for DACA and an amnesty for the DREAMers.

People walk on the frozen Reflecting Pool at the National Mall, Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018, in Washington. The bitter cold that followed a massive East Coast snowstorm should begin to lessen as temperatures inch up and climb past freezing next week. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Fallacies of 'climate crisis' exposed by freezing temps

- The Washington Times

Come on now, admit it -- if nothing else, these freezing temperatures have put a damper on the whole climate change logic, the one that goes cars and electric heat are the precursors to humankind's demise and that the only stop is to tax people more and spread the wealth to lower-income countries via the United Nations.

New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski wears the team logo on sweatpants as he speaks to the media following an NFL football game against the Buffalo Bills, Sunday, Dec. 24, 2017, in Foxborough, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

It's about more than the sweatpants

As my hubby and I pulled up to the front door of the fancy five-star steakhouse that a friend had given us a gift certificate for, we were shocked by the sign that awaited us.

Illustration on aiding freedom in Iran through discontinuing the JCPOA deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ousting the ayatollahs

The Iranian election of 2009, re-electing President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, was so obviously fixed that the results ignited a near-revolt that threatened the terror-sponsoring regime of the ayatollahs.

Illustration on the end of Robert Mueller's time investigating by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Pumpkin time for Robert Mueller

Coins have two sides. So do most decisions evaluating risk. Look before you leap, but he who hesitates is lost. People who drive instead of fly because they think flying is dangerous haven't looked at the other side of the coin: statistics clearly show that flying is much safer than driving.

Illustration on trash talking about President trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trash talking about Donald Trump

I will never forget my senior year in high school. We were playing our bitter and highly-rated rival in football and in the week before the game, the other team was trash talking us nonstop. They said we were too fat and too slow and too small to even keep the game close. "You suck, we're great, that's why we are going downstate," was their abusive chant. Then we went out and beat them something like 24-0. It was sweet and it sure shut them up.

FILE - In this May 16, 2012, file photo, the Facebook logo is displayed on an iPad in Philadelphia. Facebook is acknowledging something many already know: Passively scrolling through social media can make you feel bad. The social media giant whose platform has become a daily addiction for hundreds of millions of people sheds light on both sides of the issue a blog post Friday, Dec. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

'You don't get to make up your own Jesus'

Piper: It's not about gay or straight, it's about the definition of what it means to be human. Even Gore Vidal said, "there is no more such a thing as a homosexual person than there is a heterosexual person, these are behavioral adjectives." We are not defined by our desires. It's about our behavior. It's not about our being.

Gusty wind picks up snow accumulated on the ground as Jesse Sherwood, of Jersey City, N.J., jogs at Liberty State Park, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018, in Jersey City. About 100 million people faced a new challenge after the whopping East Coast snowstorm: a gusty deep freeze, topped Saturday by a wind chill close to minus 100 on New Hampshire's Mount Washington that vied for world's coldest place. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Baby, it's cold outside

The brutal cold weather making everybody miserable almost everywhere -- the mercury has fallen to the low 70s even in Southern California and into the low 60s in Miami. It has to be blamed on something or somebody, so why not blame it on global warming?

** FILE ** This mouse was produced from stem cells coaxed from skin tissue of adult mice and then reprogrammed. Two teams of Chinese scientists have made a major advance in the development of a new kind of stem cell that doesn't involve destroying embryos. (AP Photo/Nature, Dr. Qi Zhou)

The take-no-prisoners war

Neither man nor rat gives quarter in their ancient war on each other. Neither side takes prisoners, and after all these years there's no winner, though rats have survived. The District of Columbia, which has rats aplenty, is deploying a new and lethal weapon with the hope that springs eternal.

More than a tempest in a teapot

There's nothing new about globalism. Ocean and desert trade routes brought the silk and spices of the east to ancient Rome. Hellenistic culture -- admittedly at sword point -- reached as far as the Indian subcontinent thanks to Alexander the Great's endless lust for new lands to conquer.

'Transgendering' is the annihilator

According to the recent article "Media now resorts to extreme narrative: Trump's 'insane'" (Web, Jan. 3), Tim Graham, director of media analysis at the Media Research Center, recently cited an MSNBC report that claimed President Trump's "profound sexual and masculine insecurities are literally threatening to annihilate the planet."

Doubting agencies is security risk

President Trump continues to believe Russian President Vladimir Putin's comments, and he continues to question U.S. intelligence agencies' analysis of Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Naturally, he does not want the validity of his election questioned, but his criticism of our intelligence agencies and the FBI poses a risk to national security.