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Illustration on the risks of the Middle-East peace process by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good Luck, Jared Kushner

Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law, and Jason Greenblatt, formerly one of the president’s real estate lawyers, are pursuing what the president calls the “ultimate deal,” a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. We should wish them luck because they’re going to need it.

Illustration on Trump's abiding political philosophy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Liberty, equity and fraternity

There’s a move to define Donald Trump as a populist, so as to link him to some of the nastier people in American politics, like Pitchfork Ben Tillman, Father Coughlin and David Duke.

Illustration on improvements to the GOP tax plan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Five ways to improve the tax bill

The Senate-passed tax bill is a policy triumph that will provide a shot of performance enhancing drugs into the veins of the economy. It’s not perfect, but the combined effect of cutting business tax rates, eliminating the state and local tax deduction, and repealing the ObamaCare individual mandate tax, means we are at the precipice of the biggest conservative policy victory since the Reagan years.

Stained Glass Badge Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The courage to judge

The Washington Surgi-Clinic in Washington, D.C. is now on record saying that, for a modest fee, it will perform a late-term abortion on a healthy, viable baby boy or girl.

With the deadline looming to pass a spending bill to fund the government by week's end, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., meets reporters following a closed-door strategy session, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Tougher challenges than cutting taxes

Passing tax reform in record time will prove a significant accomplishment, but it pales by comparison to the challenges Republicans must tackle next.

A Little Love for Roy Moore Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Another perspective on Roy Moore

Roy Moore’s name is indelibly linked to sexual predation; but do you know the specific accusations and accusers? Quite a number of women say that Mr. Moore asked them out when they were aged 16 to 18, and that he got their parents’ permission to do so. All this, 26 to 40 years ago. It’s worth looking carefully at the claims and the evidence.

Illustration on diplomacy and economic sanctions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Gauging the impact of economic sanctions

Carl von Clausewitz thought of military war as a continuation of diplomacy through other means. Economic sanctions are economic war and should be similarly regarded as tactics subordinated to a diplomatic strategy.

Illustration on the benefits of the GOP tax reform plan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Democratic tax-cut doomsayers

Earlier this week House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi predicted somewhat apocalyptically that passage of the Republican tax bill would quite simply mean “the end of the world.” It is true that the lady from the Bay is given to hyperbolic overstatement, but she seems to see herself as the leader of a party and movement that views those who disagree with them as bent upon destruction, murder and, yes, ending the world.

Illustration on the history of American money, banks and debt by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How America blazed a trail for government debt

As the United States faces a national debt of more than $20 trillion as a result of profligate spending — and looks to raise that ante with tax cuts — it should be noted that this untoward policy was begun exactly 327 years ago on Dec. 10. Massachusetts became the first colony to borrow money by issuing a paper currency — and the first in the history of Western Civilization (the Chinese were actually the inventors, putting forth notes as early as 806 A.D.).

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., joined by, from left, Small Business Administration Administrator Linda McMahon, Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., and Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., speaks to a group of small business owners as Republicans work to pass their sweeping tax bill, a blend of generous tax cuts for businesses and more modest tax cuts for families and individuals, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The fiscal mess that tax cuts won’t fix

We’ve heard a lot of frightening figures in the last week or so as the Senate approved a tax cut bill that is now in a conference with the House to iron out big differences between the two versions.

Illustration on Dennis Rodman and diplomacy with North Korea by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Dennis Rodman defense

On this, the 76th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, I am accompanying former basketball star and accidental diplomat Dennis Rodman on a visit to Guam. Like Hawaii was in 1941, Guam is an American territory with strategic military importance, home to around 7,000 brave American military personnel. And like Hawaii in 1941, Guam has been threatened by a foreign adversary. Instead of Gen. Tojo, Guam has been targeted by Marshal Kim Jong-un of North Korea, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, as a target for their potentially nuclear-armed missile strikes.

Related Articles

Roy Moore story takes strange Project Veritas twist

- The Washington Times

James O'Keefe of Project Veritas name and fame tried to out The Washington Post in an undercover video and audio recording as biased against Roy Moore, on an intentional witch hunt to take down the Alabama candidate. But he fell short. The Post, during fact-checking, caught on to the sting.

Charles Manson. (Associated Press)

The stink of the '60s lives with us still

- The Washington Times

Charles Manson, perhaps the most wicked killer since the Nazis set up their abattoir in the Germany of the previous century, is gone now, banished by death to a decision at the judgment bar of God, from which there is no appeal. But we can measure the damage he and his times did here on our patch of Earth.

Illustration on the economic benefits of lower taxation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Choosing political bias over economic reality

Why is it that those who have been right in the past are often ignored, while great attention is paid to those who have been wrong? Many "politically correct" forecasters' words are accepted as gospel by the media despite dismal records.

An era of belated reckonings

The English poet of the Middle Ages, Geoffrey Chaucer, is generally credited with coining the phrase that has been updated in modern English to read, "Better late than never." It means to do something or to arrive later than expected may not be good, but it is better than not at all.

A survey conducted the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation found that one-third of millennials think former President George W. Bush is responsible for more death than Soviet leader Joseph Stalin. (Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation)

Fighting for freedom

If you consider yourself a conservative, have you ever thought about why? How would you answer someone who asked you to explain the reason?

Illustration on Constitutional violations against business by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Flushing the Constitution

Washington D.C.'s city government is nationally known for its anti-business bias. A law enacted late last year and scheduled to take effect on New Year's Day 2018 shows why.

Dependent on Electronic Device Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Afflicted by electronic device dependency

Four-time Grammy award winner Henry Olusegun Adeola Samuel, better known by the stage name Seal, has sold 20 million records worldwide and is known for such hits as "Kiss From a Rose" and as a coach on "The Voice Australia" in 2012 and 2013.

Illustration on bad charities by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Cracking down on bad charities

With Christmas season soon upon us — though the TV ads would have us think it's already here — we will see a surge in charitable donations as Americans look to spread the holiday cheer and help the less fortunate. If the past is any indication, however, there are more than a few grinches and louses who are licking their lips at the chance to put some of that money in their own pockets.

The fuel of holiday cheer

Black Friday is the holy grail of retail, but there's no day that the nation's cup doesn't runneth over with black gold. American oil and natural gas are flowing like rivers, poised to power the nation's economy to new prosperity. Having just given thanks for the nation's bounty, Americans are rushing into a high-octane season of gift-giving, with every reason to anticipate more prosperity in 2018.

People sit on an independence heroes' monument after watching a ceremony marking the 214th anniversary of the battle that led to Haiti's independence from France, in Cap Haitien, Haiti, Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017. During the ceremony, the Haitian president officially reintroduced the army some 22 years after the national army was disbanded. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

Going home to Haiti

How long is "temporary?" Like the answer to so many of life's questions, it depends. The man who sits down on a red-hot stove, "temporary" seating will be a very short time. "Temporary" applied to a government program can mean a very long time. The temporary buildings built on the National Mall to accommodate the federal bureaucracy during World War II, for instance, were not razed until the Nixon administration did it more than two decades later.

Stop opioid abuse where it starts

"FDA pushes companies to develop opioids that resist abuse" (Web, Nov. 21) is extremely timely because President Trump just declared a public-health emergency over the opioid crisis. As a master-of-public-health candidate and a health provider, my perspective is that this wouldn't help much in solving the current opioid crisis.

Accusers should take polygraphs

As women are coming forth in droves to claim they were sexually harassed by politicians, corporate chiefs, celebrities and other well-known individuals, in most instances, it is too late to pursue any criminal charges due to the passing of the statute of limitations. Civil suits might also be barred.

Political and other hacks

What went wrong? Or, as Hillary Clinton put it in her book title (she forgot the question mark), "What Happened?" Donna Brazile's "Hacks" tries to answer that question. And in a way it does, though perhaps not in the way Ms. Brazile intended.

SNYDER: Never a dull spin on college coaching carousel

Maybe it's the public nature of job openings that often materialize after rampant speculation. The list of hot prospects and rumored candidates are intriguing as well. So too is the debate in defining great jobs vs. good jobs vs. lousy jobs. The high salaries involved don't hurt, either.

In this Nov. 1, 2014, file photo, Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., speaks at Wayne State University in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)

Joe Scarborough on sex-scandalized John Conyers: He's 'still an icon'

- The Washington Times

John Conyers, under fire from women who've accused him of sexual misconduct, may have stepped aside from his ranking Judiciary Committee position. But to left-leaning notables like MSNBC's Joe Scarborough and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Conyers is still an "icon," worthy and deserving of political admiration and support.