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In this Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson, file)

Drain the education swamp: College students’ tyrannical behavior must be stopped

How many conversations have we had with our friends, family and co-workers wondering what happened to the millennials? We expect a new generation to have new ideas and new ways of approaching the world. So how do we explain when a new generation is steeped in bullying, complaining about hurt feelings, demanding “safe spaces,” and using pride in fragile egos and weakened emotional states as the excuse to condemn free speech?

Illustration on China's role in diffusing the North Korean nuclear threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Nobody’s fool over North Korean nukes

Our news-hack kids — or, as Obama chief spinner Ben Rhodes called them, the “27-year-old know-nothings” — don’t have a clue as to the operative history of the North Korean nuclear threat to Asia, the Pacific and the United States.

Illustration on lawsuits harassing energy producers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Energy producers’ uphill battle against wealthy environmentalists

American manufacturing has been undergoing a tough transition for decades. Import competition and currency manipulation by other countries as well as regulatory excess at home have all taken a toll in many sectors of manufacturing. Just as manufacturing in America appears to be coming back, it faces a formidable new threat: a cabal of activists, cunning lawyers, ambitious politicians and a network of well-heeled benefactors.

Removing Government Intervention Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Protecting American business abroad

Westerners applaud the actions of the Trump administration to end the war on the West waged by the Obama administration, including: President Trump’s efforts to revitalize energy production from federal lands — oil and gas and coal; his dispatch of the Environmental Protection Agency’s land-grabbing “waters of the United States” rule; and his order to revoke, roll back or revise the national monument decrees with which President Obama placed millions of acres of federal lands off-limits to economic and recreational uses.

Secure Air Traffic Control Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Privatization with a potential for danger

Relieving the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) of its oversight of our nation’s air traffic control (ATC) operations would create significant concerns in both military and homeland security air defense mission areas. House Transportation Committee Chairman Bill Schuster has advocated relentlessly for ATC privatization, drafting and promoting two separate bills outlining the move to privatized control of the busiest airspace in the world. Endorsed by the Trump administration, this move has repercussions beyond the inherent conflict of interest presented by a commercial airline governing board.

Illustration on the changing attitudes toward good and evil in Star Wars by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Choosing favorites in ‘Star Wars’

On May 25, 1977, the original “Star Wars” movie, “A New Hope,” made its debut. It immediately had an impact that is hard to measure, especially on the generation that would, unfortunately, be called “X,” itself a seemingly sci-fi moniker.

Illustration on the growing threat of nuclear crisis with North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Discounting the North Korea threat countdown

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, speaking to the Reagan National Defense Forum on Dec. 2, offered up a doomsday prediction. When asked how close the United States and North Korea are to war, Mr. McMaster replied, “It’s increasing every day.” Sen. Jim Inhofe, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, seconded that statement in even more distressing language: “It is important for us here in the Senate to communicate to the American people the credible, grave, and immediate threat that we face . We don’t have the luxury of time.”

A detail of the baby Jesus is seen in a Nativity scene in the East Room during a media preview of the 2017 holiday decorations at the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Colleges push hard for Christ-free Christmases

- The Washington Times

College administrators around the country, it seems, are rushing to acquiesce to even the most minor of voices on campuses to make sure the “C” word — that’s “C” for Christmas, shhh! — doesn’t cause angst in some offended student’s ears. Basically, they’re driving hard to drive out the reason for the season, Jesus Christ.

Illustration on The Washington Post's treatment of Judge Roy Moore by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Molested by the media

You don’t have to be a fan of Alabama’s Republican senatorial nominee Roy Moore to see that the Furies in the media aren’t willing to cut him a break even when his most lethal accusers have been caught falsifying the record. The late Charles Manson seems to have gotten a more sympathetic press. For the past two months, the “Never Moore” media have tried to sink the judge by insisting his dating of teenage girls when he was in his 30s was scandalous on its face, even when they were of age, their mothers approved and the women themselves conceded he never engaged in sexual misconduct.

Illustration on Roy Moore's run for the Senate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Roy Moore and the politics of winning

It now looks as if Roy Moore, the Republican candidate for the Senate in Alabama, will win his race, despite the publicity about his alleged improper behavior with a 14-year-old girl 38 years ago, and maybe others young girls as well.

FILE - In this May 7, 2015, file photo, labor union members and supporters rally for better wages in New York. Nearly 2 million New York workers are unionized. New York's powerful labor unions are lining up against a constitutional convention, warning voters that opening up the state's main governing document could lead to the erosion of worker protections and rights such as collective bargaining. In November 2017, New Yorkers will be asked whether to hold a convention, where delegates would consider big changes to the constitution. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Reining in the worker center end run

Is it the beginning of the end for Big Labor’s henchmen? You’d be forgiven if you think I’m referring to the Hoffas. I’m actually talking about so-called worker centers, which have recently been the labor movement’s bludgeon — all while avoiding federal rules on union transparency and conduct.

Illustration on the risks of the Middle-East peace process by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good Luck, Jared Kushner

Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law, and Jason Greenblatt, formerly one of the president’s real estate lawyers, are pursuing what the president calls the “ultimate deal,” a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. We should wish them luck because they’re going to need it.

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Nikki Haley, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, speaks during a Security Council meeting on the situation in North Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017 at United Nations headquarters. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Nikki Haley is sticking it to North Korea

- The Washington Times

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley just issued an oh-so-strong statement North Korea's way, telling the defiant regime its latest missile launch was a war-like act -- and if that's the way Kim Jong Un wants to play it, fine by the United States. But be prepared, she said. 'Cause North Korea will be "utterly destroyed" if war ensues, Haley vowed.

In this Jan. 16, 2015, file photo, Geraldo Rivera participates in "The Celebrity Apprentice" panel at the NBC 2015 Winter TCA  in Pasadena, Calif.  Rivera says he's "filled with regret" for initially discounting the sexual harassment allegations against his former Fox News Channel boss, Roger Ailes, and is apologizing for his skepticism.  (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

Geraldo Rivera opens mouth, inserts foot

- The Washington Times

Geraldo Rivera of Fox News took to Twitter to weigh in on the fast-moving Matt Lauer sexual misconduct claims to say, in essence: This is all part and parcel of the dating scene. Unfair characterization? You decide.

President Donald Trump waves as he walks on the South Lawn upon his return to the White House in Washington from a trip to Missouri on Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Not over by Thanksgiving

In August, when President Trump's lawyers persuaded him to refrain from attacking independent counsel Robert Mueller publicly — he had many times called Mr. Mueller's investigation a "witch hunt" — they also told him that the investigation was not aimed at him and not to worry because it would be over by Thanksgiving.

Cleaning Up the Department of the Interior Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cleaning up at Interior

In the 1990s, after posting the largest revenue losses at the time of any U.S. company in history, multinational computer giant IBM implemented an epic corporate turnaround. Having posted billions of dollars in annual losses, it was widely considered bloated and antiquated. Business executive Louis Gerstner Jr., largely credited with IBM's "rebirth," reflected that "Reorganization to me is shuffling boxes, moving boxes around. Transformation means that you're really fundamentally changing the way the organization thinks, the way it responds, the way it leads. It's a lot more than just playing with boxes." It's clear that the Interior Department needs such a transformation.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle    Associated Press photo

The welcome relief of a royal fairy tale

What a relief! Prince Harry and Meghan Markle -- young, romantic, endearing in their mythic appeal -- replace the old, aggressive harassers with paunch, thinning hair and sagging lecherous facial lines. There's happy news amidst the cheap and fake.

ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND EDITIONS, DEC. 2-3 - This Thursday, Nov. 23 2017 photo, shows the exterior of the historic Epsom Bible Church, moved to its current location in 2007 next to the town library, in Epsom, N.H. The same year it was moved, a New Hampshire Land and Community Heritage Investment Program grant helped make significant improvements to the building, often referred to as the meetinghouse. (Elizabeth Frantz/The Concord Monitor via AP)

The return of virtue

Rarely has the idiom "virtue is its own reward" looked better than it does in light of the sex scandals sweeping the nation. The so-called "prudishness," of a previous generation and the respect most men were once taught to have for women — and which Hugh Hefner and his disciples of "free love" mocked — are looking better with each passing day.

Anti-Immigration Political Parties in Europe Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Accepting Europe's anti-immigration parties

In a typical assessment of recent European elections, Katy O'Donnell writes in Politico that "Nationalist parties now have a toehold everywhere from Italy to Finland, raising fears the continent is backpedaling toward the kinds of policies that led to catastrophe in the first half of the 20th century." Many Jews, like Menachem Margolin, head of the European Jewish Association, echo her fear, seeing "a very real threat from populist movements across Europe."

Illustration on the near death experience of the NEH by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Near-death experience for the NEH

As the 2018 federal budget plan finally moves in its ponderous fashion from concurrent resolutions to committee markups, and then to a final conference bill and report, it will be easy to lose sight of a small but symbolic near-death experience within all the fine print — the survival of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Illustration on policing the police by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Who polices the police?

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller was supposed to run a narrow investigation into accusations of collusion between the Donald Trump campaign and the Russian government. But so far, Mr. Mueller's work has been plagued by almost daily improper leaks (e.g., "sources report," "it emerged," "some say") about investigations that seem to have little to do with his original mandate.

ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY, OCT. 29, 2017, AND THEREAFTER - In this Aug. 3, 2017, photo, packages pass through a scanner at an Amazon fulfillment center in Baltimore. While jobs have been lost in brick-and-mortar stores, many more have been gained from e-commerce and warehousing. Amazon accounts for much of the additional employment. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

The automation nation

Human progress is bound only by the limits of human imagination, and the boundaries are disappearing at warp speed. Information technology is lending an invisible hand to major sectors of human activity, and robots are muscling in on the rest. Whether it's all, or just mostly, to the good is a subject for ethicists, philosophers and theologians. For everyone else, the challenge is simply how to adjust.

Police officers patrol by an entrance to King's Cross underground train station in London, Friday, Jan. 7, 2011. More police officers were being deployed at transport hubs in London amid continuing fears of a terrorist attack, British media reported Thursday. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

Clearing up confusion

Some of our "genders" are out of control. It was never like this when everyone had not a gender, but a "sex," for better or worse. Anyone confused about which could look at a driver's license, or a student ID, and there it was, in black and white. But this was not good enough for the arbiters of political correctness.

Social Security, the Hill's elephant

In an otherwise strong and credible call to arms on the risk of congressional Republicans walking away from the Budget Control Act, Stephen Moore and Andrew Wofford devote only one line to the matter of Social Security ("Testing Republican spending restraint," Web, Nov. 13). The authors abruptly dismiss the topic, stating that benefits should be exempt. This is unfortunate and requires greater justification.

Citizenship first, party second

Politicians have always sparred with their opponents, yet in the Trump era, have we reached a tipping point? Due to the politics of character assassination, we are losing the ability to discuss issues and policies. Should we not be Americans first, then Republicans or Democrats, liberals or conservatives, second?

'Moments of an essentially personal kind'

Though Oliver Sacks published many peer-reviewed papers on his research into neurology, he is much better known for his numerous general-audience books and articles -- many about neurology, others about the history of science, and still others on botany, chemistry, evolution and the great scientists who took soaring leaps to reach our current understanding of the nature of life.