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Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Gropergate! The halls of Congress under siege!

- The Washington Times

When I was a young reporter on a certain newspaper in the South, fresh on a new job, I took a fancy to a sweet and pretty young woman (that’s how we talked in those days) working on what newspapers quaintly called “the Society pages.”

Why Trump should arm Ukraine

President Trump has often expressed his desire to build a better, more positive relationship with Russia. However, as Secretary of State Tillerson has said, improved bilateral relations will not be possible without ending Russia’s aggression against Ukraine.

Illustration on the restoration of the Alamo by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Restoring, reinforcing and remembering the Alamo

As a native Texan, as a veteran, and as Texas land commissioner, it is my solemn duty and my great honor to be the caretaker of the Alamo. Who we are as Texans started there and who we can be as Texans and Americans still lives there.

Illustration of George Papadopoulos by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Russian shadow

Thank goodness we live in a country where the people who represent us in Congress have the power to investigate and grill federal officials to root out wrongdoing in our government.

Illustration on Brett McGurk by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Following Obama’s footsteps toward Kurdistan’s destruction

Brett McGurk, an Obama appointee serving under President Trump, is working in order to ensure that the United States continues to follow Barack Obama’s failed Iraq policy even though the U.S. now has a Republican president.

United Nations U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley, right, listens as Organization of American States Secretary General Luis Almargo speaks during a U.N. meeting on human rights concerns in Venezuela, Monday Nov. 13, 2017, at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Nikki Haley quite rightly rocks U.N. boat on Venezuela

- The Washington Times

Human rights matter — that’s the message a resolute U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley just sent the Security Council’s way, reminding that Venezuela, land of the socialists, shouldn’t be allowed to skate on civil abuses. This is why Haley rocks. She’s unafraid to take the high ground on behalf of America, even when world players disapprove.

Illustration on the sexual vulgarization of the American culture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the cheap and dirty loses its punch

In the high-tech world of social media, where fake news thrives with the real, we’ve become a nation of voyeurs and eavesdroppers. Consuming the salacious is the guilty pleasure. We see and overhear a broad range of sordid comings and goings, what we used to describe quaintly as “dirty,” in the vocabularies that were once reserved for private conversations between close friends, too embarrassing for general discussion.

Illustration on CFPB by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The ‘Equifax’ threat to small-dollar loan customers

There are many flaws in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) small-dollar loan rule, which will deny millions of Americans access to a vital form of credit. One of the biggest problems, which has become an acute problem lately, is the security of consumers’ personal financial information.

When Republicans promise but don’t deliver

Voters in New Jersey and elsewhere just sent a message to President Trump and congressional Republicans: Deliver or expect to get replaced, and planned tax cuts will hardly be enough.

Illustration on a peace initiative in the form of an international research vessel for the South China Sea               The Washington Times

Using science diplomacy in the South China Sea

Despite White House efforts to deny well-established climate change reports and U.S. withdrawal from the 2015 Paris Climate Accord, most might question the wisdom of laying down a science — led peace-building plan in the contested South China Sea disputes. Yet science may prove to be the linchpin for bringing about cooperation rather than competition not only among the claimant nations in the region but also between Washington and Beijing. While President Trump’s recent offer to Vietnam’s President Tran Dai Quang to mediate the complex and challenging disputes over access to fish stocks, conservation of biodiversity and sovereignty claims caught many observers by surprise, it should not have.

Investigation into the Investigation Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

More Chronicles of Hillary

The Department of Justice will soon commence an investigation to determine whether there should be an investigation (you read that nonsense correctly) of a scandal involving the Clinton Foundation and a company called Uranium One. It appears that FBI decisions made during the time that Hillary Clinton was being investigated for espionage will also be investigated to see whether there should be an investigation to determine whether she was properly investigated. (Again, you read that nonsense correctly.)

In this Oct. 17, 2017, file photo, Army soldiers hone their long-distance marksmanship skills as they train at Fort Benning in Columbus, Ga. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Filling military quotas with the mentally ill

The Army very quietly announced in August that it will lift a ban on waivers allowing people with a history of mental health issues, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, to join their ranks. Even in normal times this should concern you greatly, let alone when the world appears to be preparing for war.

Illustration on the campaign against glyphosphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forcing taxpayers to fund anti-chemical activism

It’s bad enough when tax-exempt foundations and activist groups use junk science and scare campaigns to promote excessive regulations and set the stage for class action lawsuits against perfectly good products. It’s intolerable when our tax dollars directly finance U.S. and European Union government agencies that do likewise.

Illustration on the criminalization of government agencies by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The criminalization of America’s government agencies

The criminalization of government agencies by the Obama administration was far more extensive than previously realized. The Uranium One deal is a prime example of how key government agencies have been criminalized.

Related Articles

Facebook Facilitates Fake News Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Close encounters with Facebook falsehoods

A year before fake news created in Russia was unleashed on the 2016 U.S. presidential election through social media, those of us in the Ukrainian government were warning Facebook about the likelihood that would happen. We have, sadly, become experts in fake news attacks.

Illustration on the centennial of the Bolshevik Revolution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Communism's century of devastation

President Franklin D. Roosevelt called Dec. 7, 1941 "a day that will live in infamy," and with good reason. The date that Tojo's Japan launched a surprise attack on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor heralded America's entrance into the bloody fighting of World War II. But there are other dates that live in infamy, and many of them aren't nearly as well known. But they deserve to be. Take Nov. 7, 1917.

FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2016 file photo Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., speaks during a ceremony on Capitol Hill in Washington. Reid and John Boehner are going to co-chair a new public policy think tank at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. MGM Resorts International and UNLV plan to bring plans for the institute headed by the retired U.S. Senate Democratic majority leader from Nevada and the former House Republican speaker from Ohio before Nevada university regents on Thursday, March 2, 2017.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Nuclear warfare

Dams are breaking all over town. Donna Brazile's new book, "Hacks," has broken the dam that has been holding back a flood of insider stuff about how the Democratic National Committee smoothed the way for Hillary Clinton to win the party's presidential nomination last year.

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One at Yokota Air Base in Fussa, Japan, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, to travel to Osan Air Base in Seoul, Korea. Trump is on a five country trip through Asia traveling to Japan, South Korea, China, Vietnam and the Philippines. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Swimming on the Pacific Rim

"I came, I saw, I conferred," may not match Julius Caesar's historic description of his foreign adventure, but President Trump's 12-day Asia trip is meant to conquer doubts that the United States is still the power to be reckoned with across the Pacific (and everywhere else). When disruptive forces test traditional regional alliances, over issues of trade, free passage on the open sea and the denuclearization of the rogue regime in North Korea, the United States is the indispensable bridge over troubled waters.

Hillary can't be trusted

Political strategist Donna Brazile said recently she was shocked when she learned Hillary Clinton had co-opted the entire Democratic National Committee and rigged the primaries against Sen. Bernard Sanders.

Known for his 'opinions of uncommon clarity and inimitable style'

Viewed by both admirers and detractors as the most transformative jurist of our era, the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia had a towering intellect. Yet he was humble. He was wise. And he was very funny. And he never forgot the lesson his Italian immigrant father impressed upon him: "Brains can be hired by the hour, just like muscles. Only character is not for sale at any price."

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, accompanied by U.S. Ambassador to Japan William F. Hagerty, left, waves to a guest during a state banquet at the Akasaka Palace, Monday, Nov. 6, 2017, in Tokyo. Trump is on a five-country trip through Asia traveling to Japan, South Korea, China, Vietnam and the Philippines. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Donald Trump's Christian friends in Canada

- The Washington Times

Just a few days ago, I had the honor of serving as the keynote speaker at the Christian Heritage Party of Canada's 2017 Convention in Gatineau, Quebec. And one big takeaway from our neighbors to the north: They absolutely love President Donald Trump.

Christ Church looks down on George Washington, Robert E. Lee

- The Washington Times

CORRECTION: In a column dated Oct. 29, 2017, I incorrectly noted: "The vestry of Christ Church in Alexandria, however, is not capable of grappling with such complexities. Truly, pearls before swine. After all, it is so much easier just to obliterate painful history than to understand it and learn from it."

Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), general of the Confederate Army in the Civil War. CORBIS

Honor and compromise

White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly has spent a lifetime fighting America's wars. But nothing he did in his many assignments as a professional soldier ever triggered the uproar that followed his comments on Laura Ingraham's new Fox News "Ingraham Angle" last Monday night about a war Mr. Kelly missed by a century -- the Civil War.

Time Magazine Primal Scream Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Staying blind to the economic boom

Time Magazine's cover this week is a classic. It blares: "The Wrecking Crew: How Trump's Cabinet Is Dismantling Government." Also last week The New York Times ran a lead editorial complaining that team Trump is shrinking at an "unprecedented" pace the regulatory state that was erected to new heights under President Obama. These and other media reports have had all the subtlety of a primal scream.

Dealing with the China Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Confronting China to get 4 percent growth

So far, the Trump economy is a resounding success. Unemployment is down, wage gains are stronger and stocks are setting new records, but a lot more than tax and regulatory reform will be needed to deliver the economic growth Americans should expect and deserve.

Illustration on the social media echo chamber by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Misinformation and echo chambers

Facebook, Google and Twitter are talking to the Congress about how they helped Russia spread fake news and create divisions within our country during the 2016 Presidential election. They were at least complicit, and arguably enabled, what may be the biggest, and most effective anti-U.S. propaganda and destabilization operation in history.

Judicial activism can be dangerous

U.S. District Court Judge Collen Kollar-Kottelly has engaged in judicial activism ("US court bars Trump from reversing transgender troops policy," Web, Oct. 30). The president has broad discretion in the area of national security. President Trump issued an executive order placing a moratorium on transgender military service based on his determinations regarding national security. Judge Kollar-Kottelly overturned major portions of it.

Misplaced liberal sympathies

Liberal talking heads Rachel Maddow and Chris Matthews recently vented their righteous indignation about President Trump's "death penalty" tweets regarding the Islamic State terrorist murders in New York City.