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Illustration on Syrian strategic choices by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A mission quandary in Syria

Almost two weeks ago, after yet another incident of a chlorine gas attack by Syria’s Assad regime, Defense Secretary James Mattis warned both Syria and its Russian ally that using gas weapons against civilians or on the battlefield was very unwise. Last week, U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley was more blunt, warning that America is “prepared to act if we must” to stop indiscriminate bombings of civilians by the Assad regime.

Illustration on the legal and commercial rights of generic drug manufacturers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Big Pharma and its battle lines

- The Washington Times

It may be hard to believe, but some conservatives are arguing that any conservative who supports a measure before Congress called the CREATES Act that would allow generic drug makers under certain circumstances to go to court to get their competitors to play by the rules are ideological sellouts too willing to jump into bed with liberals and greedy trial lawyers.

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Workers prepare to free a trapped car from tons of debris after mudslides from heavy rain overnight caused the closure of Topanga Canyon Boulevard, a key mountain highway over the Santa Monica Mountains, above Malibu, Calif., early Thursday, March 15, 2018. No injuries were reported. The California Department of Transportation said that with more rain expected, the route through Topanga Canyon will remain closed through at least Sunday night. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

The great California train wreck

Let me just say from the outset that I still miss California. When I see news about my former state, it's like reading the details of a train wreck after having safely disembarked a comfortable time ago.

A brave woman who defied Mao Zedong

As "free speech" and Vietnam War protests roiled the nation decades ago, a noisy fringe among the marchers proudly flaunted the green cotton jacket preferred by Mao Zedong, longtime dictator of the People's Republic of China.

Illustration on Hezbollah in Lebanon by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The problem is Hezbollah

Current U.S. policy toward Lebanon confirms Voltaire's observation that "the human brain is a complex organ with the wonderful power of enabling man to find reasons for continuing to believe whatever it is that he wants to believe."

In this photo released by Brazil's presidential press office, Brazil's President Michel Temer, left, speaks during the opening plenary session of the World Economic Forum for Latin America, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Wednesday, March 14, 2018. Temer says Brazil will bring the question of U.S. tariffs on steel to the World Trade Organization if it doesn't achieve a "friendly" solution through negotiations.(Beto Barata/Brazil's presidential press office via AP)

Trump's tariffs aren't killing the World Trade Organization

Historians may mark President Trump's tariffs on solar panels, aluminum and steel as the death knell for the World Trade Organization (WTO) but the institution was faltering long before President Trump came along.

Illustration on Rex Tillerson by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Tillerson exit, the Russian gambit

Fourteen months after he had become secretary of State, Rex Tillerson learned Tuesday that President Trump had fired him by sending out a public tweet.

Use tech for border wall

The president is on the right track pushing ahead with plans to build a wall to defend our border from illegal interlopers. However, he is way behind the times with his desire to physically "see through" the wall.

These weapons not 'assault rifles'

I expect better of The Washington Times than to blindly repeat the liberal myth that stores are selling "assault weapons" ("Outdoors stores quietly continue to sell assault weapons," Web, March 13). Military select-fire assault weapons such as the M16, and M4 are by definition capable of firing "fully automatic" (i.e., emptying the entire clip with one press of the trigger). Virtually no gun stores sell these; the few "Class III" dealers who are allowed to do so require a special federal license and a personal recommendation from the local chief of police.

President Donald Trump meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the Oval Office of the White House, Monday, March 5, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) ** FILE **

America's love affair with Israel grows under Trump

- The Washington Times

The left likes to try to sell the line that the Palestinian Authority loves the Israelis, welcomes peace and wants nothing more than a harmonious agreement that allows both peoples to live side-by-side, in perpetual prosperity -- oh yes, and that President Donald Trump's announced move of the U.S. Embassy to Israel from Tel Avid to Jerusalem kills that plan. But apparently, the line isn't selling.

How Hillary Clinton still misses the point

Woe are the Democrats. For generations now, they've been telling the American people that only they, and their cohort of liberals and leftists, understand and truly value women. Because of their special understanding of women, only they can be trusted to do what's right politically for them, they tell us. Then came Hillary Clinton pulling the curtain back on that dangerously false narrative.

Climate Change Rations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Apocalypse now?

Since the beginning of recorded history there have been end-of-the-world predictions. In recent years we have had radio preachers, politicians and scientists declare with certainty that the world would soon end, either because of our decadent lifestyle, or because of "global warming," now known as "climate change."

Illustration on the abuse of truth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Twitter, truthiness and titillation

When talking politics, online or in person, you don't often hear anything about the "magnificent middle." You'll hear epithets like the "dirtbag left" or the wicked "alt-right," and all of the ugly free associations to commies and fascists, loonies and wackos. Moderation is mush, evenhandedness is stupid, considering two sides of an issue is so 20th century (or maybe 19th). Only one side could possibly be right.

Illustration on Trump, Stormy Daniels and freedom of speech by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

President Trump and freedom of speech

When James Madison drafted the First Amendment — "Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech" -- he made sure to use the article "the" in front of the word "freedom." What seemed normal to him and superfluous to moderns was actually a profound signal that has resonated for 227 years. The signal was that because the freedom of speech existed before the government that was formed to protect it came into existence, it does not have its origins in government.