Political Commentary - Washington Times
Skip to content

Commentary

Featured Articles

Illustration on the recent nuclear alarm in Hawaii by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Hawaii error and liberal hysteria

Murphy’s Law was written to describe how governments work. It was proved yet again on January 13 when an employee of the Hawaii Emergency Management System sent a cellphone alert that said, “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” The alert was false but until it was corrected almost 40 minutes later it terrified millions of residents and tourists.

Illustration on protecting aborted babies delivered alive by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Giving the smallest patients equal protection under the law

Doctors today routinely diagnose and treat a myriad of conditions, illnesses and diseases suffered by society’s littlest patients — unborn babies and newborns — significantly enhancing both their health and longevity.

Illustration on GOP political dangers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When politicians exploit inequality

For Republicans, it’s dangerous to focus on the moment — accusations that President Trump is a racist, DACA and avoiding government shutdowns — but the more enduring threat to the GOP’s grip on power are charges of insensitivity about inequality.

Illustration on unintended Democrat sabotage of DACA legislation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The fate of the Dreamers

Donald Trump probably shouldn’t have suggested — not in public, at least — that Haiti and other nations that send refugees and immigrants to the United States are “s-holes.” It’s not only demeaning; it adds insult to injury.

Rep. John Culberson, Texas Republican, said, "The time is right" to consider a return to earmarks. He is pushing for a test run so Congress can prove it can be responsible. (Associated Press/File)

The trouble with earmarks

Nearly a year after President Trump was sworn into office on a campaign pledge to “drain the swamp,” he now wants Congress to reopen the spending spigots again.

Related Articles

Richard Nixon    Associated Press photo

An Olympian break in the war between the words

- The Washington Times

A few Ping-Pong balls broke the Cold War ice around China a generation ago, following Richard Nixon's stunning trip to Beijing (when it was still called Peiping), and soon the United States and China were on their way to normal diplomatic relations.

"I'm not a racist. I'm the least racist person you will ever interview," said President Trump told reporters as he met with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, California Republican (left). The furor grew out of an immigration discussion at the White House on Thursday where Mr. Trump allegedly made vulgar comments. (Associated Press)

'Trump's a racist' -- Marcia, Marcia, Marcia

- The Washington Times

There comes a point when calling a spade a spatula becomes a bit worn and wearying and the public starts to catch on and actually notice and say, hey, that's a spatula, not a spade. In other words: People start to doubt the message is actually true.

Illustration on the Clinton/Lewinsky scandal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Vindication for a whistleblower

What fools (and hypocrites) these mortals be. Two decades have passed since Linda Tripp blew the whistle on sexual hijinks in high places with her tapes of Monica Lewinsky, the young intern, describing to her confidant and colleague the passionate ordeal of a sexual liaison with the president of the United States. She blew the whistle, she says, to protect her friend, but 20 years on she's still a villain for many women who remember those times.

Taxpayer Money Lost in  Space Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The hidden fees of SpaceX

No one likes hidden fees. From unauthorized phone charges to home closing costs and prepaid card levies, they take a toll on low and middle-income Americans. To mitigate consumer outrage, members of Congress often demagogue unknown expenditures like ATM and airline baggage fees in committee hearings; costs which usually do not amount to more than a few dollars.

Uncle Sam Watching You Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The undoing of limited government

Late last week, Rep. Devin Nunes, California Republican, chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, repeated his public observations that members of the intelligence community — particularly the CIA, the NSA and the intelligence division of the FBI — are not trustworthy with the nation's intelligence secrets. Because he has a security clearance at the "top secret" level and knows how others who have access to secrets have used and abused them, his allegations are extraordinary.

'The Russian people knew they were being lied to'

From the beginning, Americans have been taught that a free press is essential to the well-being of our democracy. And that has proved true, time and time again. But that truth seems uniquely threatened today, as the organs of our major media increasingly subscribe to an ideological, political and cultural group-think, more Orwellian than Stalinist, but equally insidious.

The folly of pre-emptive war

Ironically, what could be the biggest political threat to the Trump presidency now is the failure to live up to his lofty "winning" campaign promises by waging a pre-emptive war on North Korea.

Illustration on the varied content of private conversations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good news vs. private conversations

Last week the headlines should have abounded with the year's good news. It was the economy: GDP up some 3 percent and for the last quarter nearly 4 percent, unemployment down to a 17-year low and black unemployment at the lowest level since such statistics were compiled. The stock market was soaring, up some 42 percent since Donald Trump was elected, and inflation was low. It was the best Christmas season in years.

Illustration on the need for a bipartisan immigration deal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The president's speech

Much of my so-called career as a foreign correspondent was spent in countries that could accurately be described with the scatological adjective allegedly uttered by President Trump last week.