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President Donald Trump gives the thumbs-up as he arrives on Marine One at the White House in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 18, 2018, as he returns from Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The healthy president

Waiting for someone to die, whether to claim an expected inheritance, outlast a rival for the affections of a wife or mistress, or to vacate the White House, requires stamina and patience. From the day Donald Trump shocked the world and appalled the elites, the Democrats and their media allies have been searching for a deux ex machina, a miracle to get him out of the way of decent folk.

FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 20, 2017, file photo, people stand in line near an Apple Store at an outdoor shopping mall in Beijing, China. On Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018, Apple announced it is planning to build another corporate campus and hire 20,000 workers during the next five years as part of a $350 billion commitment to the U.S. economy. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)

Apple brings it home

The announcement on Wednesday that Apple Inc. will bring $350 billion in cash parked overseas — that’s billion with a B — home to the United States, to invest here and create as many as 20,000 new jobs, is likely to be the economic story of the year.

This frame from video released by the Chelsea Manning Senate campaign on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018 shows Chelsea Manning in a campaign video. Manning on Sunday confirmed via Twitter that she is a candidate for U.S. Senate. (Chelsea Manning For US Senate via AP)

Seeking refuge in the U.S. Senate

Chelsea Manning, who used to think she was Bradley Manning, and who was once a private first class in the U.S. Army before he became a traitor, now thinks he can be a U.S. senator from Maryland. Maryland may not be quite that deep shade of blue, but it’s a brave new era in the Democratic Party, where feverish Democrats think Donald Trump is insane and Bradley Manning is a woman because he says he is.

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at the National Governors Association special session called "Collaborating to Create Tomorrow's Global Economy" in Providence, R.I., July 14, 2017. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press via AP) ** FILE **

A lesson from Canada

Talking the talk is easy. Walking the walk is not so easy. Justin Trudeau, the prime minister of Canada, thought he could take a shot at the Americans, and Donald Trump in particular, for its determination to get out-of-control immigration under something resembling control. Lesson apparently learned.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks at a plaque dedication ceremony at the Central Park police precinct in New York, Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Greasy business in the Big Apple

You might have thought that Michael Bloomberg, with his mercifully futile crusades to protect everyone from their guns and their Big Gulps, would have set a record for grandstanding by a New York City mayor that would stand through the ages. Bill de Blasio, his hulking successor, is giving the diminutive Mr. Bloomberg a real run for his money, or, actually, your money. The Bloomberg grandstand was pushed into the shade.

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Addy Valdez, 12, holds her cousin, Jasmine, while her family starts to clean up the damage from Hurricane Irma in Everglades City, Fla., Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (Katie Klann/Naples Daily News via AP)

Disasters and dopes

Disaster comes in a variety of heartbreaking shapes and sizes, all of them unwelcome. Some, like global warming, are the work of nature; others are man-made. A little bit of rationality is all it takes to figure out which is which. But recent events suggest that the day they were handing out common sense some people stepped up to the nonsense window instead.

Police and fire vehicles shield the view of a trailer home where five children died in a house fire in The Butte, Alaska, on Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017. Officials believes the victims were five girls, all between the ages of 3 and 12. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

Racing to the self-driving car

The freedom of the open road holds a magnetic appeal for Americans, quickening like the flood when Henry Ford unleashed his Model T, but exhilaration can't be traded for the convenience of the "safety" of a car that drives itself. Such a car is a measure of progress only if it works.

Supporters of the Former Georgian President and former Ukraine official Mikheil Saakashvili clash with border guards at Shegini check point on Ukrainian-Polish border, Ukraine, Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. Saakashvili and a crowd of supporters are proceeding into Ukraine on foot after breaking through a line of guards on the Polish-Ukrainian border. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

Debating correct usage

Words have been abused and, like, cheapened in our present day, but they're still, like, important. He who controls the language, as Orwell reminded us, controls the debate. One of the satellite arguments in the debate over immigration is what to call those who break the law by crossing the border illegally.

In this Sept. 6, 2017, photo, Anthony Pham, talks in his Monroe, Ga., barber shop. He became a U.S citizen in 1987, five years after he immigrated from Vietnam.   Now a business owner and proud Republican in Georgias staunchly conservative 10th Congressional District, Pham says he supports maintaining legal status for immigrants who arrived in the country illegally as children, the so-called Dreamers brought by adult family members.  (AP Photo/Bill Barrow)

Doing the right thing about DACA

Once upon a time the Constitution meant something to everybody. Every American took pride in a Constitution that was written in plain language that anyone, even a lawyer, could understand. Ours was "a nation of laws," not of judicial fiat or bureaucratic whim. That was the strength of the exceptional nation.

The unlikely romance on Capitol Hill

The Republican Congress of 2017 bears a remarkable resemblance to the New York Mets of 1962, their first year in baseball. The Mets couldn't hit the ball and they couldn't catch the ball and succeeded only in showing up for supper. Their manager, Casey Stengel, "the old perfessor," finally cried out in desperation: "Can't anybody here play this game?"

President Donald Trump pauses during a news conference with the Emir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday Sept. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Thrown off the gravy train

The Environmental Protection Agency's gravy train just ain't what she used to be. Green groups are awestruck, agog and maybe even aghast at the news that the Trump administration has put a political operative to work vetting applications for EPA grants worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

Washington State University College Republicans President Amir Rezamand, right, and his predecessor, James Allsup, second from right, who resigned after attending the Confederate monuments protest in Charlottesville, Va., talk with unidentified students during a small rally for Free Speech organized by the Washington State University chapter of Young Americans For Liberty on Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 in Pullman, Wash. (Geoff Crimmins/The Moscow-Pullman Daily News via AP)

Regulating free speech

"Everybody talkin' 'bout heaven ain't goin' there," as the ancient spiritual of the black church in America warns, and that goes double about free speech. "Free speech" sounds good to just about everybody, but actual free speech is a brew too strong for everybody. Many meddlesome do-gooders applaud government-regulated speech and call it free speech. Everybody's free to say what the government says is OK to say. What's not free about that?

Vautrot's Cajun Cuisine shows the severe damage caused inside and out following heavy flooding, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 in Bevil Oaks, Texas. (Kim Brent/The Beaumont Enterprise via AP)

Fixing flood insurance in Harvey's wake

Hurricane Harvey took the most devastating flooding in the city's history to Houston, and the cost of repairing the damage will be astronomical. Sadly, the federal flood insurance program is already underwater and Harvey will only add to the flood of red ink. It's clear that Congress must reform the program so the premiums property owners pay more closely reflect the flood risk. Until that happens, nature's frequent fury will continue to undermine the finances of everyone.

FILE- In this Tuesday, April 5, 2016 file photo, an employee sorts Legos in the the new LEGO flagship store unveiled as part of the new Les Halles shopping mall during the press visit in Paris. Danish toy maker Lego said Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, it will cut 1,400 jobs, or about eight percent of its global workforce, after reporting a decline in sales and profits in the first half of 2017. (AP Photo/Francois Mori, File)

The maximum price of the minimum wage

It's easy to be generous with someone else's money. Politicians get away with it because the average American does not understand fundamental economics. Raising the minimum wage by law is popular because many people think no one has to pay the costs. When someone posts a reminder of how the world works, the ignorant scream.

People hold up a banner during an event to protest President Donald Trump's decision to revoke the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, in Las Vegas. President Donald Trump on Tuesday began dismantling the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program, the government program protecting hundreds of thousands of young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Waking up from an impossible dream

Complicated problems defy simple solutions, especially when the problems are deliberately created. The dilemma over what to do with children brought into the United States by their illegal-immigrant parents, the so-called "Dreamers," is Exhibit A. They stand illegally on American soil in the impassive eyes of the law, but they're already American in their hearts. President Trump's decision to enact an "orderly wind-down" of executive amnesty for these Americans-of-the-heart sets the stage for a fair-minded solution to a long-standing immigration quandary.

Sen. Claire McCaskill

Fear stalks Democratic incumbents

A Texas politician once sneered that "the middle of the road is for yellow lines and dead armadillos." But it's also a haven, if only a temporary one, for politicians suddenly afraid of the life they've cultivated at the edge.

When a shoe doesn't fit, wear it anyway

Summer's nearly over, the first hurricane of the season has arrived with catastrophic force, and men will have to put away their white slacks and black-and-white spectators when they take them off Monday night. So it's time to think about shoes.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt (Associated Press)

Tales from the red-tape factory

The Environmental Protection Agency regards itself as the dispenser of the good and the just, protector of the snail darter and keeper of the land and everything on it. Anyone who questions this article of the faith can expect trouble.

Dancing on the debt ceiling

Washington knows how to turn melodrama into farce. That's the lowdown on the debt ceiling debate about to be served up on Capitol Hill. It would be a laugh if it were not so serious. The oft-repeated argument that the nation must keep overspending in order to stay on course leaves the sane shaking their heads. But without a correction of direction, the unpayable bill will come due and there will be no last laugh.

It's 4th and long for Colin

Dr. Johnson observed that "patriotism is the last refuge of scoundrels." Perhaps, but scoundrels have moved on. Crying "racism" when there is no racism is the work of modern scoundrels, and most of them are on the left.