Political Editorials - Washington Times
Skip to content

Editorials

Featured Articles

George Washington (Image: The White House) ** FILE **

George Washington’s Thanksgiving Proclamation

Whereas it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favor; and — whereas both Houses of Congress have, by their joint committee, requested me “to recommend to the people of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness”:

Turkeys, worms and Schadenfreude

Republicans and other conservatives who are tempted to indulge excessive Schadenfreude over the woes of Charlie Rose, Al Franken and their sordid fellows, taking delight in their pain and humiliation, should remember Iron Law of Politics No. 3, that nothing recedes like success. Giving too many hoots and hollers at turkeys over this holiday season is great fun, but the universal truth about worms is that they eventually turn.

FILE - In this May 15, 2017 file photo, protesters hold signs during a demonstration against President Donald Trump's revised travel ban, outside a federal courthouse in Seattle. A Somali refugee living in Washington state is asking a federal judge to let his wife and young children join him in the U.S., saying the Trump administration's indefinite ban on allowing the families of refugees to enter the country violates immigration law. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

Bordering on Obama-era dysfunction

Fidelity is scarce in Donald Trump’s Washington, except among the not so loyal opposition. Whether owing to compassion or incompetence, the Trump administration one year on has failed to replace holdovers, leaving in place Barack Obama’s people who are dedicated to obstruction and delay of the new era. In some federal departments, the greatest danger a bureaucrat faces is a paper cut. But about immigration, it’s whether the laws enacted to protect the American people will be enforced.

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y., center, arrives to speak to a large group of protesters rally against the Senate Republican healthcare bill on the East Front of the Capitol Building in Washington, Wednesday, June 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The season of the big slice

President Trump has something extra to be grateful for this Thanksgiving: a the long-awaited tax cut bill, passed by the House and en route to the Senate. As he marks the season with the traditional pardoning of the White House turkey, Republicans in line for similar clemency will get it only if the voters can find it in their hearts to forgive a plodding, inefficient (did someone say “incompetent”?) and lazybones Congress.

Related Articles

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Kentucky Republican, said the parliamentarian's guidance is not a ruling. (Associated Press/File)

Republicans flee the health care fight

If the Republicans in the U.S. Senate were a baseball team, they would be the 1962 New York Mets. The Mets won only 40 games that summer, losing 120, the most inept performance since 1899 when a team called the Cleveland Spiders also won only 40 games. As the Mets stumbled to the end of the disastrous season, their manager, Casey Stengel, cried out in desperate frustration: "Can't anybody here play this game?"

Gov. Kate Brown reacts to a moment in a video played after the House of Representatives enacted Sine Die to adjourn the legislative session at the state Capitol in Salem, Ore. on Friday, July 7, 2017. The Oregon Legislature has adjourned the 2017 session that saw the passage of record-funding for schools, a long-term transportation package, gun restrictions, cost-free abortions and health care funding for Medicaid and undocumented immigrants. (Anna Reed/Statesman-Journal via AP)

Oregon's abortion business gets weirder

Oregon's state motto is "Alis volat propriis," Latin for "She flies with her own wings." It's nice sentiment, full of boast and swagger, but the bird aspires to be a cuckoo, with two left wings making it difficult to fly straight.

This is an undated image made available by the World Wildlife Fund Finland of a Saimaa Ringed Seal as it rests on a rock in Lake Saimaa, Finland. Wildlife conservationists in Finland are giving endangered seals in Europe's fourth largest lake a spot of online fame _ they plan to stream encounters with some of the estimated 360 remaining seals in southeastern lake of Saimaa, in a bid to raise awareness of their plight.  (Ismo Marttinen/WWF Finland via AP)

To the Finland Station

While the United States debates whether it has "a Russian problem," and who's responsible for it, 6 million wary Finns know they have such a problem. It's inherited, and they're fearful again of a wrestling match with an old foe.

The cloud over next year

If anybody can blow a sure thing, the Republicans can, but 2018 is not shaping up yet as an opportunity for the Democrats to regain control of the U.S. Senate. Democratic candidates are raising money by the barrel, but more in partisan hope than realistic expectation.

U.S. President Donald Trump calls out to the crowd as he arrives to enter his presidential viewing stand, Sunday, July 16, 2017, during the U.S. Women's Open Golf tournament at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Restoration of the judiciary continues

Restoring the federal judiciary to its constitutional moorings is what many Americans call Job 1, and it was on this issue they put aside their considerable reservations about Donald Trump, swallowed hard, considered the alternative, hoped for the best, and cast their votes for him. On this score, he has redeemed their faith.

In this June 28, 2017, photo, marijuana plants grow at the Desert Grown Farms cultivation facility in Las Vegas. Frenzied activity at these facilities have been focused on one goal: Getting ready for the start of recreational marijuana sales Saturday in Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Where there's smoke there's revenue

The potheads and the revenooers of Nevada are in the throes of a marijuana emergency. It's not that the potheads are smoking too much of it. It's that the revenooers can't get enough of it to the potheads. There's plenty of pot but there aren't enough drivers to transport the weed to the legal market.

The Pascagoula River floods streets as Tropical Storm Cindy drops heavy rains, Saturday, June 24, 2017, near Escatawpa, Miss. (AP Photo/Butch Dill)

Zealotry is no substitute for science

On its way out the door last January, the Obama administration took care to satisfy the demands of helpful special interests, issuing many new and often loosely written environmental rules. One of these, the "Waters of the United States" rule, which attempted to declare everything short of milady's bathtub a navigable river or stream, and subject to regulation by overly zealous bureaucrats, has been ruled out of order. But others just as absurd have not.

More youths, cheaper coverage

A recent Gallup survey found that the number of uninsured Americans increased by 2 million this year ("U.S. uninsured up by 2M this year as gains erode: Survey," Web, July 10). Coverage losses were most prominent among young adults.

This is a Feb. 2017 image of the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica made available by the Antarctic Survey on Wednesday July 12, 2017. A vast iceberg with twice the volume of Lake Erie has broken off from a key floating ice shelf in Antarctica, scientists said Wednesday. The iceberg broke off from the Larsen C ice shelf, scientists at the University of Swansea in Britain said. The iceberg, which is likely to be named A68, is described as weighing 1 trillion tons (1.12 trillion U.S. tons). (British Antarctic Survey via AP)

Confronting the temperature taboo

The New York Times has discovered peril in the Arctic. "Explorers and fishermen find climate moderating about Spitzbergen and the Eastern Arctic," the newspaper reports, and seal hunters and explorers who sail those icy seas "point to a radical change in climactic conditions, and hitherto unheard of temperatures in that part of the earth."

FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2016 file photo, President Barack Obama talks with Russia's President Vladimir Putin at the opening session of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) in Lima, Peru. When U.S. and Russian presidents meet, the rest of the world stops to watch. For decades, summits between leaders of the world powers have been heavily anticipated affairs in which every word, handshake and facial expression is scrutinized. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Arsonists to put out the fire

Barack Obama is back at last from his new career of hanging out with the 1-percenters, eager to headline a big-dollar fundraiser for the National Democratic Redistricting Committee at a private home in Washington. The Democratic Party has all but disappeared in many state capitols, but where's there's a pulse, there's wan hope.

FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2013, file photo, Missouri Sen. Eric Schmit, leads a meeting at the Capitol in Jefferson City, Mo. Schmitt, now the Missouri State Treasurer, offered strong criticism of the state budget of Illinois on Tuesday, June 11, 2017, in St. Louis. The first-term Republican spoke at a news conference along the Mississippi River in St. Louis, urging Missouri lawmakers to avoid the pitfalls that have befallen neighboring Illinois. (Kile Brewer/The Jefferson City News-Tribune via AP, File

When the wolf is at the door

In a normal, minimally competently run state, the adoption of the state's budget is news among the ads for toenail fungus cures on Page 12, along with the usual items about dog biting man. Setting budgets, after all, is a routine responsibility of the state, like building roads and keeping the public schools open. Alas, that's more than residents of Illinois can expect.

In this July 7, 2017, file photo, France's President Emmanuel Macron talks with U.S. President Donald Trump after the family photo on the first day of the G-20 summit in Hamburg, Germany. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

Treason, anyone?

Hysteria is never a substitute for argument, even when the prey is Donald Trump. This is a caution lost on the hysterics who, try as they might, cannot dispatch the president to the island of lost presidents. So they keep raising the ante of speech and fantasy.

FILE - In this Saturday, July 8, 2017, file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping arrive for a meeting on the sidelines of the G-20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany. The United States apologized for mistakenly describing Xi as the leader of Taiwan, China said Monday, July 10, 2017. Chinese scholars said the mistake shows a lack of competence in the White House that is not conducive to healthy U.S.-China relations. (Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP, File)

Resisting election integrity

One verity that all Americans, even in Washington, can agree on is that the integrity of elections is essential to the prosperity and survival of the republic. The point has been hammered home by an endless stream of charges that Russia interfered with the 2016 presidential election that put Donald Trump in the White House and sent Hillary Clinton into the wilderness.

Rwanda's President, Paul Kagame, center, Israel's President Reuven Rivlin right, and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pose for a photo at the President's residence in Jerusalem, Monday, July 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)

The one-state solution

For a half century, negotiating a relationship between the Jews of Israel and the Muslim and Christian Arabs of Palestine has been a major diplomatic preoccupation. But without finding the formula, reality is wiping away the concept of two states in the old British definition of Palestine.

President Donald Trump walks on the South Lawn upon arrival the White House in Washington, Saturday, July 8, 2017, from the G-20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Trump in Europe

For all his angry tweets and occasional bluster, Donald Trump can rise to the occasion, and say important things that millions want to hear but other "leaders" are too timid, too soft, or too intimidated to say.

FOR USE MONDAY JULY 10, 2017 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this July 6, 2017 file  photo, Illinois Speaker of the House Michael Madigan, D-Chicago, gives a speech following the Illinois House voting to override Gov. Rauner's veto and pass a budget for the first time in two years at the Illinois State Capitol, in Springfield, Ill. Democratic Comptroller Susana Mendoza's staff estimates she will be able to cover expenses in August. The law allows for borrowing or taking $1.5 billion from other state funds in the interim. (Justin L. Fowler/The State Journal-Register via AP)

Marching to the poorhouse

Money makes the world go 'round, and the lack of it usually brings everything to a halt. Congress is grappling with long-promised tax reform and the naysayers warn against getting in the way of the tsunami of revenue to the Treasury, urging legislators to stay the course. Some might call it staying the curse. Only if there really is a free lunch is there nothing to worry about.

FILE In this Monday, June 18, 2012 file photo President Barack Obama participates in a bilateral meeting with Russia's President Vladimir Putin during the G20 Summit, in Los Cabos, Mexico. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Sounding off overseas

Squeezing out one last burst of applause is risky for any entertainer, as any old vaudevillian could have told Barack Obama. The idea is to leave the fans in the cheap seats yelling for more. But Mr. Obama, the original snowflake -- always at risk of melting and dead certain that he's unique in history — scorns the tradition of a president expected to go home after his time is done.

FILE--This June 15, 2017, file photo shows the headquarters of Oregon's Driver and Motor Vehicles Division in Salem, Ore. The Oregon Legislature on Thursday, July 6, passed a bill to allow local motor-vehicle offices to issue state driver's licenses and other forms of identification that comply with federal requirements borne out of 9/11 security concerns. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky, File)

Mysteries of sex at the DMV

Members of the D.C. Council are sometimes puzzled by why the rest of the country doesn't take seriously their schemes to make Washington the 51st state. As city-states go, the District of Columbia is neither Florence nor Venice.

The wolf at the door

The Children's Hour at the White House is over, and it's time to get serious about North Korea. The consequences that nobody wants to think about are finally at hand. The peril is great and the hour is late.

President Trump and the first lady Melania Trump wave from the Air Force One upon their arrival Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, July 5, 2017. Trump arrived in Poland ahead of an outdoor address in Warsaw on Thursday and energy talks with European leaders. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

Independence Day for affordable energy

Donald Trump has called the last week of June as Energy Week, but if the trend holds 2017 could be remembered as Energy Year. Americans love exploiting the gasoline abundance that emboldened Fourth of July holiday drivers to hit the road in record numbers. When the brakes are released, the great American economic machine is ready to gas up and take off.