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FILE - In this March 2, 2014 file photo, movie mogul Harvey Weinstein arrives at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Two recent lawsuits have made the unorthodox legal argument that Harvey Weinstein's pursuit of young women, and his attempts to quiet sexual assault accusations, effectively amounted to organized crime. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

The risks of redress and reform

The attempt to redress and reform one of the great blots on American society, the use of authority in relationships to intimidate subordinates into granting sexual favors, seems to be reaching a crisis point, though the human condition probably guarantees that we will never run out of victims.

Armed police at the scene on Cromwell Gardens in London, after a car reportedly ploughed into people outside the Natural History Museum in London, Saturday Oct. 7, 2017. Police said a number of people were injured and one person was detained at the scene. (Victoria Jones/PA via AP)

Wolf whistler, be careful in Old Blighty

The bobbies will get you if’n you don’t watch out. London’s Metropolitan Police are considering whether to regard a wolf whistle aimed at a pretty girl (or even a plain girl with a great personality) as a “hate crime,” to be treated as a serious breach of the law.

Michigan attorney general candidate Dana Nessel.

Can the world be saved from the penis?

A good man is hard to find, so the common wisdom once went, but in the spirit of the hysteria season certain feminists have rewritten that to, “Never trust a man with his factory equipment intact.” A woman in Michigan is running hard for state attorney general as the Democratic candidate with a missing penis.

Demonstrators are arrested outside of the U.S. Capitol during an immigration rally in support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and Temporary Protected Status (TPS), programs, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Playing chicken on the border

Chicken is a game usually won by the boldest and most irresponsible player in the game. Democrats usually prevail because they know how to place the blame on the other player. Republicans, eager to avoid being seen as not very nice, usually threaten no one and settle for a friendly pat on the head. But this time they must gird their bashful loins, grit their teeth and refuse to yield. At stake is more than money. With the immigration issue on the table the outcome is a matter of national security.

President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington. Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

This year, in Jerusalem

For once, Donald Trump’s taste for all-capital letters makes the right point with blunt precision: “Jerusalem IS Israel’s capital: I will move our embassy there AND make peace with the Palestinians.” Making peace with people who don’t want peace is always difficult, when it’s not impossible, but the president promises to soldier on.

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In this Thursday, June 8, 2017, file photo, former FBI Director James Comey speaks during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

James Comey's literary apology

James Comey has good reason to despise Donald Trump. He would hardly be human if he doesn't. The president cashiered him without ceremony, and nobody likes to hear "you're fired!" Now the director of the FBI until he was sacked has a book contract, and he's in the dilemma similar to that of Zsa Zsa Gabor's seventh husband. He knew what was expected of him on their wedding night, but despaired of making it fresh and surprising.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, center, looks at the watch of Bureau of Internal Revenue Commissioner Caesar R. Dulay, right, as Executive Secretary Salvador Medialdea watch them during the 113th Founding Anniversary of the Bureau of Internal Revenue in metropolitan Manila, Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017. The tough-talking Duterte briefly lashed out at North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in a speech before local revenue collectors Wednesday. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

The road to reality in Pyongyang

The road to reality in Pyongyang leads through Beijing, and it's a road with many potholes. China doesn't want chaos in North Korea, but neither does it want to give up the means to profit from that chaos. Nevertheless, North Korea's second intercontinental ballistics missile launch last week caught the attention of the five countries with a stake in a stable Korean peninsula.

President Trump embraced a Republican-sponsored bill last week that would trim the broad range of family relationships that qualify for immigration and inject a government screen for needed skills and English proficiency into employer immigration. (Associated Press/File)

A good start on immigration reform

Why enact a law or write an executive order to reform a broken immigration system when a poem will do? President Trump endorsed new immigration legislation Wednesday, moving to a merit-based system, and it was greeted with predictable cries and squeals from advocates of open borders.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016, file photo, a miniature reproduction of Arturo Di Modica's "Charging Bull" sculpture sits on display at a street vendor's table outside the New York Stock Exchange, in lower Manhattan. U.S. Stocks are rising Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017, as payment processors and banks trade higher. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

The abuse of Freddie and Fannie Mae

Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae almost took down the U.S. economy by transforming bad mortgages into something that looked valuable, but were anything but. The extraordinary bailouts that followed put everyone, for one good reason and another, shaking in their boots.

How Republicans can still win on Obamacare

When Nancy Pelosi, the former speaker who famously said "we will read [the details of Obamacare] after we vote on it," was once asked by Chris Wallace of Fox News just what the Democrats were willing to offer Republicans as part of a grand new spirit of bipartisanship, she replied nothing. Nada. Zilch.

Security forces leave after a suicide attack followed by a clash between Afghan forces and Islamic State fighters during an attack on the Iraqi embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, July 31, 2017. (AP Photos/Rahmat Gul)

The threats of war

America's longest war has cost more than 2,300 lives and 20,000 wounded, and $1.07 trillion. The value of the lives cannot be measured. Now President Trump has authorized sending 3,000 to 5,000 more troops to strengthen training and support efforts there, adding to the 9,800 Americans who are part of an international force of 13,000.

Electric cars and gas pains

Moral preening isn't pretty, and "greener than thou" is all the rage in Europe. Volvo says that starting in 2019 it will no longer manufacture gasoline-only cars, only electrics or gas-electric hybrids.

It's still the economy, Stupid

Donald Trump has shown a remarkable ability to survive snubs, slights and spirited assaults almost from the day he threw his hat in the ring, more than a year ago, and he seems to relish testing the depths of the loyalty of conservatives. His remarkable twitter campaign against Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a particular favorite of nearly every conservative, might be the greatest test so far.

In this Saturday, July 15, 2017 file photo, a rosary hangs over the portrait of the late Chinese Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo is displayed outside the Chinese liaison office in Hong Kong. China cremated the body of imprisoned Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, who died this week after a battle with liver cancer amid international criticism of Beijing for not letting him travel abroad as he had wished. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu, File)

The world ignores an outrage

The death of Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo from late-stage liver cancer last month is further evidence that China's suppression of human rights is growing more severe. Worse still, foreign reaction to outrage in China is growing weaker, and cynical besides.

A Palestinian living in Lebanon chants slogans as she holds a placard with Arabic read ing, "turn toward Palestine," during a sit-in in support of Palestinians and the Jerusalem holy site of Al Aqsa Mosque, in front of the United Nations Headquarters in Beirut, Lebanon, Thursday, July 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

When a murderer is called a martyr

Ethics now get short shrift nearly everywhere, and what was once normal behavior is regulated only by moral ambiguity. But murder, whether by an angry spouse, street hoodlum or terrorist driven by religious fanaticism, still has no sanction. There's no justification for outbursts of butchery, and cash doled out to Palestinian terrorists and to their families is blood money, and it's to the shame of the U.S. government that some of that blood money is lifted from the pockets of Americans.

A Romanian army tank maneuvers on a pontoon bridge on Borcea tributary to the Danube river during the Saber Guardian 17 joint military exercise with US troops, in Bordusani, Ialomita, Romania, Sunday, July 16, 2017. The Saber Guardian 17 exercises led by U.S. Army Europe began this week in Eastern Europe involving 25,000 military personnel from more than 20 allied and partner countries. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)

God returns to Eastern Europe

Only a quarter of a century after the Iron Curtain rang down on the repression and official atheism of the evil empire -- "godless communism" some called it -- there's a resurgence of religious faith and identification in what was once the Soviet Union and its satraps in eastern Europe.

FILE - In this Sunday, June 11, 2017 file photo, Equality March for Unity and Pride participants march past the White House in Washington. Most LGBT-rights activists never believed Donald Trump's campaign promises to be their friend. With his move to ban transgender people from military service on Wednesday, July 26, 2017, on top of other actions and appointments, they now see him as openly hostile. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Keeping the military fit and ready

President Trump reversed his predecessor's foolishly sentimental policy on Wednesday that opened the military services to transgender soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines. He reversed it because it was the right thing to do.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions said free speech rights are being eroded on college campuses across the nation.
(Associated Press/File)

The war with the wrong man

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is the stand-up guy in the Trump administration. He lent legitimacy and seriousness to the Trump campaign when no other Republican in the Senate would get within 20 feet of the Donald. He has lent similar seriousness and magisterial grace to an administration that so far has had little of that.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Kentucky Republican, hasn't said which alternative to Obamacare will lead the amendment process in the GOP's bill. (Associated Press)

Wasting away on Obamacare

The sad Obamacare saga continues, like a particularly weepy soap opera. The U.S. Senate voted Tuesday to open debate on the latest Republican attempt to repeal and replace, which was a procedural victory for the Republicans, and even that required the vice president to break a tie vote. Meanwhile, a badly broken health care system continues to leak dollars by the billions.

President Donald Trump looks over the crowd of scouts as Energy Secretary Rick Perry, left, uses his phone at the 2017 National Boy Scout Jamboree at the Summit in Glen Jean, W.Va., Monday, July 24, 2017. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Angling with a taste for Trump

Guilt casts a wide shadow in an interconnected world. As special counsel Robert Mueller expands his investigation to ever wider circles of the relationship, as it might be, between the Trump presidential campaign and all things Russian, the list of those falling under official suspicion grows longer.

A billboard welcomes Pope Francis, at St. Mark's Cathedral in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, April 27, 2017. On Friday, Francis is scheduled to begin a two-day pilgrimage to Egypt aimed at lifting the spirits of Christians in the Middle East, whose numbers have rapidly dwindled in recent decades due to war, displacement and emigration. The visit will include a meeting with Egypt's president and the Grand Imam of Al-Azhar as well as a Mass in a stadium on the outskirts of Cairo. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

The war against the Christians

Persecution of Christians continues in certain parts of the world, mostly in the Middle East and throughout South and Southeast Asia, but it rarely gets much attention even in the Western media. Even many churchmen in the West turn a blind eye.

FILE - In this June 21, 2017 file photo, Ricky Dubose, left, and Donnie Russell Rowe enter the Putnam County courthouse  in Eatonton, Ga.   When the two inmates escaped from a prison bus leaving two dead guards in their wake, the reward for information leading to their capture rose quickly. During a prison transfer early on June 13,  Dubose and Rowe overpowered Sgt. Christopher Monica and Sgt. Curtis Billue, authorities said.  (Bob Andres/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP, Pool)

What a deal!

A judge in Tennessee has offered repeat offenders of minor crimes a deal: He'll reduce their jail time if they submit to sterilization. Those who take the deal get 30 days off their sentences. If they agree to take a class on the dangers of doing drugs with children in the home, he'll take off another two days of jail time.

Protecting the open mind

In his 1987 best-seller "The Closing of the American Mind," the late Allan Bloom lamented "how higher education had failed democracy and impoverished the souls of today's students." It's worse now, thanks in no small part to militant left-wing students who, not content to close their own minds, insist on the right to close the minds of others.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at a news conference to announce an international cybercrime enforcement action at the Department of Justice, Thursday, July 20, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Reforming government robbery

There's nothing "civil" about civil asset forfeiture. It's a law enforcement practice of seizing assets of suspects, who may or may not have broken the law, and it invites abuse. But Attorney General Jeff Sessions wants to expand it.