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Editorials

In this Jan. 21, 2018, file photo, lights shine inside the U.S. Capitol Building as night falls in Washington. (AP Photo/J. David Ake) ** FILE **

A privilege, not a right

No nation is more confused over who, why and how someone may cross its borders than the “nation of immigrants.” America’s confusion is largely the work of men and women who would get lost on a highway with no exits. Common sense, an uncommonly precious leadership quality, is the compass that points the way toward an immigration policy based on respect for the law. Common sense, alas, suffers a sharp discount in our present day.

In this May 21, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, right, holds a bilateral meeting with Qatar's Emir Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al-Thani, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Trump sided with Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries Tuesday in a deepening diplomatic crisis with Qatar, appearing to endorse the accusation that the oil-rich Persian Gulf nation is funding terrorist groups. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Peace in the Middle East

Donald Trump isn’t the first man to point out that life in the Middle East is built largely on a mirage of fantasy and resentment. But he is the first man in a long time to do something about it. Moving the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem is simply a long-overdue recognition of the reality that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel, and the Jews aren’t going anywhere.

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President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron walk from the Oval Office to a tree planting ceremony on the South Lawn at the White House in Washington, Monday, April 23, 2018. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

To a real nuclear deal

Human events sometimes seem to spill across the globe without rhyme or reason, but occasionally events converge in harmonic fashion, revealing a stunning opportunity.

President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron embrace at the conclusion of a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, April 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

France remembers

Donald Trump's romance with Emmanuel Macron continued to blossom Tuesday when they planted a tree together on the White House lawn. The French president brought the sapling, a cutting from the European Sessile oak, with him from Paris.

Another hurdle cleared

Abad novelist couldn't make this up: American politicians who pretended to sing only from the hymnbook of peace now want to spoil the best opportunity in three generations to pacify the warmongers of North Korea, and turn back the tide of nuclear proliferation which threatens us all. Their fuzzy rationale is that the mover of the promising breakthrough is Donald Trump, and the imperative of his enemies to destroy his presidency must come first. Seldom have political differences become so untethered from the reality of the common good.

In this April 18, 2018 photo, President Donald Trump listens during a news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump's private Mar-a-Lago club, in Palm Beach, Fla. The Democratic National Committee on Friday sued President Donald Trump's campaign, Trump's son, his son-in-law, the Russian Federation and WikiLeaks. The Democrats accuse the defendants of conspiring to help Trump win the 2016 presidential election after breaking into DNC computers and stealing tens of thousands of emails and documents. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Death to the inflation tax

There's new interest in indexing the capital gains tax to account for inflation. This is something good for everyone that conservatives have been pushing for years. The White House is working now to determine whether the president has the legal authority to make this change in tax policy by his own hand. There's evidence that he can.

Chinese President Xi Jinping talks with Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum Klaus Schwab during their meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Monday, April 16, 2018. (Naohiko Hatta/Pool Photo via AP)

Good news from the front

President Trump invited hoots of ridicule from the elites from coast to coast (though not so much from the Great Lakes to the Gulf) when he said "trade wars are good, and easy to win." Nevertheless, with trade tensions bubbling between the United States and the People's Republic of China, the Trump administration has notched a couple of significant triumphs. That's a good thing, because a rebalancing of the Sino-American trade relationship is all to the good.

The Capitol Dome of the Capitol Building at sunrise, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018, in Washington. After another government shutdown, congress has passed a sweeping long term spending bill which President Donald Trump is expected to sign later this morning. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Dancing around the budget

The typical congressman just can't help himself. He's the grown-up kid who fished his daddy's credit card out of his pants pocket while Daddy slept, and he has been the big man on the high-school campus since. This lack of self-restraint was further demonstrated last week when a vote on a balanced-budget amendment to the Constitution failed once more.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban speaks during an international press conference in the Parliament building in Budapest, Hungary Tuesday, April 10, 2018, two days after his Fidesz party in coalition with the Christian Democratic Party won a landslide vitory in the general elections. (Lajos Soos/MTI via AP)

Teaching Europe about democracy

Critics know what's wrong with the European Union. It suffers from what they call a "democratic deficit." Democracy is often loud, usually messy and everyone gets a voice. This is inconvenient for the elites and the bureaucrats.

Then-FBI Director Robert Mueller listens as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 13, 2013, as the House Judiciary Committee held an oversight hearing on the FBI. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

When anything goes

If Robert Mueller ever needs work, we would be happy to commend him to a school of journalism looking for a dean.

Demonstrators rally in support of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) outside the Capitol, Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018, in Washington, on the second day of the federal shutdown. Democrats have been seeking a deal to protect the "Dreamers," who have been shielded against deportation by DACA, which President Donald Trump halted last year. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) **FILE**

No discounts for Dreamers

Life is not fair, as John F. Kennedy famously said, and sometimes it's not fair for everybody. The Arizona Supreme Court last week ruled that the "Dreamers," children brought to the United States by their illegal-immigrant parents, are not eligible for in-state tuition rates at Arizona's three state universities and at its network of community colleges.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., announces to reporters he will not run for re-election and will retire next year at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The speaker exits

"Nice guys finish last" is part of the lore of baseball, an insight by Hall of Fame player and manager Leo Durocher, but it could be the epitaph for the Washington career of Paul Ryan, the speaker of the House who is widely praised for civility and good manners. He announced Wednesday that he's fed up and going home.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan faces a flurry of questions during an appearance on "Good Morning Britain," June 6, 2017. ("Good Morning Britain" screenshot) ** FILE **

Death at the point of a knife

Sadiq Khan is the mayor of London, who now sees the error of his earlier ways of enforcing the law. London is suffering a wave of murder, which is no stranger to Old Blighty, as fans of "Midsomer Murders" and other popular imported British television fare well know. But this murder in London is up close and personal, mayhem is often random, and there's getting to be more of it.

In this Jan. 3, 2018, photo released by the U.S. Navy, a Naval Station vessel, right, prepares to assist the future USS Omaha (LCS 12), a 218-foot-long littoral combat ship, pier side during a brief fuel stop in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The Omaha was conducting a change of homeport to San Diego, Calif. (Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class John Philip Wagner, Jr./U.S. Navy via AP)

No foxhole for an atheist

If the U.S. Navy appointed its first atheist chaplain, as the organized atheists demanded (twice), what could his duties as a chaplain be? Perhaps he could tell a sailor seeking spiritual solace in the face of death not to worry, he has no soul, anyway.

Ashlee Jones prepares coffee at a Philz Coffee shop in San Francisco, Friday, March 30, 2018. Coffee sellers will have to post ominous warnings in California because each cup contains a chemical linked to cancer, a judge ruled. The culprit is a byproduct of the bean roasting process that is a known carcinogen and has been at the heart of an eight-year legal struggle between a tiny nonprofit group and Big Coffee companies. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

The Hysteria State

The judge who ruled the other day that coffee purveyors in California must put a cancer-risk warning label on their beans calls to mind the old joke about the man, getting a little long in the tooth, who was told by his doctor that he would have to give up wine, women and song. "But Doc," he replied, "if I have to give up wine and women, what will I have to sing about?"

President Donald Trump speaks at a news conference with leaders of Baltic states in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, April 3, 2018.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The beckoning slam dunk

President Trump is disgusted by his signature on the $1.3 trillion omnibus spending bill he signed last month. He said so when he signed it. He noted, correctly, that the new law appropriates tens of billions of dollars of spending that the agencies don't need and even in some cases, don't want. (Who says bureaucrats can't push themselves away from the trough?)

FILE -- In this Dec. 10, 2013 file photo Winnie Madikizela-Mandela listens to speeches during the memorial service for her ex-husband, former South African president Nelson Mandela at the FNB Stadium in Soweto, Johannesburg. South African state broadcaster SABC says anti-apartheid activist Winnie Madikizela-Mandela has died aged 81, it was announced on Monday, April 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)

Winnie Mandela, 1936-2018

Winnie Mandela, who died Monday at age 81 after a lengthy illness in her native South Africa, was different things to her family, to Africa and to the world. CNN described her as an "anti-apartheid crusader." The BBC called her an "anti-apartheid campaigner." Some newspapers described her merely as "controversial." The Rev. Jesse Jackson said she was the "face of hope and courage." For years after her husband's imprisonment she was the unfortunate face of a just cause. The kindest description was "the former wife of Nelson Mandela."

File - In this March 5, 2018 file photo, snow covers the mountain tops over looking Lake Tahoe in South Lake Tahoe, Calif. Californians close out their rainy season with the break they were hoping for, as a series of late-winter storms ease drought conditions that had been setting in again. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

Californication blues

Californians have always lived with the fear that a really big rumble along the San Andreas fault, and there goes Hollywood's tinsel, San Francisco's templed hills and the wild northern California coast, sliding headlong into the Pacific.

Roseanne Barr sits down for an interview with ABC's "20/20" to discuss the return of her iconic television show. (Image: ABC screenshot)

A nice hand for the big lady

The revolution, when it comes, won't be on television, to the disappointment of couch potatoes everywhere, but there's already "the resistance," which is on a channel near you. In the 14 months since Donald Trump became president, "resistance" programming has dominated the air waves, and cable and satellite, too.