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Editorials

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-In in the Oval Office of the White House, Tuesday, May 22, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The president pulls the plug

Donald Trump was never going to win the Nobel Peace Prize, anyway. He demonstrated “the art of the deal” with his cancellation of the “summit” with Kim Jong-un, which North Korea had skillfully begun to portray as a triumph of its own statecraft. The president pulled the rug out from under Mr. Kim with a triumph of his own. We can all be thankful.

President Donald Trump speaks to the media before boarding the Marine One helicopter on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, May 23, 2018, en route to a day trip to New York City. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Slinging doubts about Singapore

The Democrats and their allied pundits are licking their chops at the prospect of supping on soup of bones from the collapse of the Singapore summit between President Trump and Kim Jong-un. Mr. Trump now rates the prospect of the summit even happening as no better than a toss of a coin.

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File - In this March 5, 2018 file photo, snow covers the mountain tops over looking Lake Tahoe in South Lake Tahoe, Calif. Californians close out their rainy season with the break they were hoping for, as a series of late-winter storms ease drought conditions that had been setting in again. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

Californication blues

Californians have always lived with the fear that a really big rumble along the San Andreas fault, and there goes Hollywood's tinsel, San Francisco's templed hills and the wild northern California coast, sliding headlong into the Pacific.

Roseanne Barr sits down for an interview with ABC's "20/20" to discuss the return of her iconic television show. (Image: ABC screenshot)

A nice hand for the big lady

The revolution, when it comes, won't be on television, to the disappointment of couch potatoes everywhere, but there's already "the resistance," which is on a channel near you. In the 14 months since Donald Trump became president, "resistance" programming has dominated the air waves, and cable and satellite, too.

FILE - In this Feb. 16, 2016, file photo, Republican state Sens. Dan Soucek, left, and Brent Jackson, right, review historical maps during The Senate Redistricting Committee for the 2016 Extra Session in the Legislative Office Building at the N.C. General Assembly, in Raleigh, N.C. Federal judges ruled Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, that North Carolina's congressional district map drawn by legislative Republicans is illegally gerrymandered because of excessive partisanship that gave GOP a rock-solid advantage for most seats and must quickly be redone. (Corey Lowenstein/The News & Observer via AP, File)

Taking politics out of politics

If he were with us today, Elbridge Gerry would have no doubt filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in behalf of Democrats in Maryland to defend the way they drew the congressional districts expressly to transform the Republican-friendly 6th Congressional District into a reliably Democratic district.

FILE- In this March 7, 2012 file photo, Illinois gun owners and supporters file out National Rifle Association applications while participating in an Illinois Gun Owners Lobby Day convention before marching to the Illinois state Capitol in Springfield, Ill. U.S. companies are taking a closer look at investments, co-branding deals and other ties to the gun industry and its public face, the National Rifle Association, after the latest school massacre. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File) **FILE**

Voices of the gun

The National Rifle Association and the Second Amendment are not the same thing, though the people who are terrified of guns, and who mostly have never held one in their hands, try to make villains of both.

The Cold War is back

Who says Donald Trump can't get tough with Russians? The president's order on Monday to send 60 Russian "diplomats" home, joining Canada, Poland, Italy, Denmark, France and Germany among other European nations, is welcome solidarity with Britain. It's in answer to the poisoning of a onetime Russian spy and his daughter as they sat on a public bench March 4 in the English provincial town of Salisbury. Britain had earlier expelled 23 "diplomats."

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speak to reporters about the massive government spending bill moving through Congress, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 22, 2018. The bipartisan $1.3 trillion spending bill pours huge sums into Pentagon programs and domestic initiatives ranging from building roads to combatting the nation's opioid abuse crisis, but left Congress in stalemate over shielding young Dreamer immigrants from deportation and curbing surging health insurance premiums. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Republican spending Democrats are proud of

The Democrats are proud of their small string of triumphs in off-season congressional races, but there's growing evidence that the Democratic leadership may not need to elect more Democrats. The Republicans will enact their agenda for them.

A woman waves a Brazilian flag outside the Supreme Court in favor of arresting former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva in Brasilia, Brazil, Thursday, March 22, 2018. Da Silva launched a book last week in which he says he is "ready" to go to jail and serve a 12-year and one-month sentence on a corruption charge conviction. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

Not good for nothing, after all

American white men are just no darn good, if you listen to the embittered ladies of the radical feminist persuasion and their enablers in the media and in certain halls of learning, but the good news is that they're apparently not good for nothing.

Former President Barack Obama address the participants at a summit on climate change involving mayors from around the globe in Chicago, Dec. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast) ** FILE **

On the run everywhere

The natives are restless everywhere, and they're frightening the elites. The political parties of the social democrats, and even the Socialists, are crumbling all across Europe. A new version of class war is shaping a new kind of politics, and the implications are worldwide.

Trader Sal Suarino, left. works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Friday, March 16, 2018. Global stock markets were mixed Friday amid caution about U.S. plans to raise tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum and uncertainty over White House politics. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

When good news is 'bad'

Bad news is bad, and sometimes good news is bad, too. This is the view of certain economists who are suddenly frightened by record low unemployment and bigger paychecks. As a famous make-believe king of Siam was fond of saying to Anna about something he didn't understand, "It is a puzzlement."

FILE- In this April 1, 2017, file photo, a service dog named Orlando rests on the foot of its trainer, John Reddan, of Warwick, N.Y., while sitting inside a United Airlines plane at Newark Liberty International Airport during a training exercise in Newark, N.J. Trainers took dogs through security check and onto a plane as part of the exercise put on by the Seeing Eye puppy program. If your pet must travel, experts say that the cabin is safer than the cargo hold. Pets too large to fit in an under-seat carrier must go cargo unless it's a service or emotional-support animal. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

Peril in the friendly skies

Nearly everyone has an airline horror story: Delayed flights, missed connections, inedible meals, lost luggage. But flying has never been safer or more affordable, unless you're a dog. Nevertheless grumpy and grousing flyers should count their blessings.

President Donald Trump reviews border wall prototypes, Tuesday, March 13, 2018, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Something there is that likes a wall

"What you have to understand about Donald Trump, a perceptive observer of the American scene once told a visitor from abroad, "is that the press here takes him literally, but not seriously, and his millions of supporters take him seriously, but not literally."

Larry Kudlow (Gage Skidmore via Wikimedia Commons) **FILE**

A good choice for the economy

President Trump asked a conservative gathering the other day whether, "after my first year in office, can anyone doubt that I am a conservative?" It was a plaintive cry from a wounded ego (if not a wounded heart).

Republican Rick Saccone thanks supporters at the party watching the returns for a special election being held for the Pennsylvania 18th Congressional District vacated by Republican Tim Murphy, Tuesday, March 13, 2018, in McKeesport, Pa. A razor's edge separated Democrat Conor Lamb and Saccone Tuesday night in their closely watched special election in Pennsylvania, where a surprisingly strong bid by first-time candidate Lamb was testing Donald Trump's sway in a GOP stronghold.  (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

Surprise in Pennsylvania

The Democrats have proved twice that they can win congressional seats with a Republican playbook. The Grand Old Party campaigned for years with the mantra, "vote Republican, we're not as bad as you think." The plea often failed. Republicans just didn't know how bad a lot of voters thought they were.

Thousands of employees of the U.N agency for Palestinian refugees demonstrate in support of their organization following U.S. funding cuts in Gaza City, Monday, Jan. 29, 2018. Earlier this month, the Trump administration slashed $60 million of a planned $125 million funding installment for 2018. Washington wants the Palestinian Authority to return to the negotiating table with Israel in exchange for aid resumption. (AP Photo/ Khalil Hamra)

The blood libel revived

The Palestinians, perhaps in the spirit of the approaching Passover season, have revived the ancient "blood libel" accusing the Jews of using the blood of Christian babies in their recipe for matzos.