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Former President Barack Obama address the participants at a summit on climate change involving mayors from around the globe in Chicago, Dec. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast) ** FILE **

On the run everywhere

The natives are restless everywhere, and they’re frightening the elites. The political parties of the social democrats, and even the Socialists, are crumbling all across Europe. A new version of class war is shaping a new kind of politics, and the implications are worldwide.

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New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks at a plaque dedication ceremony at the Central Park police precinct in New York, Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Greasy business in the Big Apple

You might have thought that Michael Bloomberg, with his mercifully futile crusades to protect everyone from their guns and their Big Gulps, would have set a record for grandstanding by a New York City mayor that would stand through the ages. Bill de Blasio, his hulking successor, is giving the diminutive Mr. Bloomberg a real run for his money, or, actually, your money. The Bloomberg grandstand was pushed into the shade.

FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump sits with Attorney General Jeff Sessions during the FBI National Academy graduation ceremony in Quantico, Va. Late last year, lawyers for Trump expressed optimism that special counsel Robert Mueller was nearing the end of his probe of Russias interference in the 2016 election. But if there was hope in the White House that Trump might be moving past an investigation that has dogged his presidency from the start, 2018 is beginning without signs of abatement.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump in the outhouse

The civil society seems to be in better hands than anyone imagined. Unfortunately, the hands are those of snowflakes, easy to melt, and forever seeking a safe place where reality never intrudes.

Illustration Wind Power by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

A blow for energy security

The Trump administration took a blow this week from its own Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which ruled against further subsidies to financially ailing coal and nuclear plants. The blow was deserved.

In this June 5, 2017, photo, a worker stacks merchandise outside a Walmart in Salem, N.H. Walmart is boosting its starting salary for U.S. workers to $11 an hour, giving a one-time $1,000 cash bonus to eligible employees and expanding its maternity and parental leave benefits. The retailer said Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, changes to its compensation and benefits policy will impact more than a million hourly workers in the U.S., with the wage increase effective next month. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

Tax cuts hit home

"Don't cut corporate taxes," they said. "The riches will only be used for share buybacks and executive perks," they said. "The workers won't actually benefit," they said. It's already looking like "they" didn't know what they were talking about.

Money transfer services allow Salvadorans and others under temporary protected status to send remittances, adding greatly to the gross domestic product of their home countries. (Associated Press/File)

The man who came to dinner

"A government bureau," Ronald Reagan once observed, "is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth." One current example of how government can bend language out of shape to preserve this artificial eternal life is the so-called "Temporary Protected Status" program.

FILE - A June 25, 1999, file photo shows an enlargement of the U.S. Postal Service's stamp depicting Rosie the Riveter, in South Portland, Maine. A group wants to preserve a portion of the old Willow Run bomber plant and house a museum there dedicated to aviation and the countless Rosies across the country. Save the Bomber Plant officials have until Thursday, May 1, to raise the remainder of the $8 million needed to save the plant from demolition. (AP Photo/Joan Seidel, File)

When women were stronger

Researchers at the Max Planck Odense Center at the University of Southern Denmark have just discovered what everybody already knew (which is the most persuasive kind of research): Women are stronger than men, and they live longer, too.

Stopping an outrageous land grab

The Mississippi gopher frog (or the "dusky gopher frog" in official federal parlance) may soon get his 15 minutes of fame, but the frog deserves better than being a pawn in a case that pits an overreaching government agency against property owners.

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner watched Donald Trump fill out his papers to be on the nation's earliest presidential primary ballot in 2015. Mr. Gardner says he will remain on the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, though he disagrees with voter fraud allegations made by the panel's vice chairman about his state. (Associated Press/File)

A day for cheaters

Democrats, other liberal activists and even one of its own appointed members cheered the demise last week of Donald Trump's Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity. The cheers may be premature.

Gusty wind picks up snow accumulated on the ground as Jesse Sherwood, of Jersey City, N.J., jogs at Liberty State Park, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018, in Jersey City. About 100 million people faced a new challenge after the whopping East Coast snowstorm: a gusty deep freeze, topped Saturday by a wind chill close to minus 100 on New Hampshire's Mount Washington that vied for world's coldest place. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Baby, it's cold outside

The brutal cold weather making everybody miserable almost everywhere -- the mercury has fallen to the low 70s even in Southern California and into the low 60s in Miami. It has to be blamed on something or somebody, so why not blame it on global warming?

** FILE ** This mouse was produced from stem cells coaxed from skin tissue of adult mice and then reprogrammed. Two teams of Chinese scientists have made a major advance in the development of a new kind of stem cell that doesn't involve destroying embryos. (AP Photo/Nature, Dr. Qi Zhou)

The take-no-prisoners war

Neither man nor rat gives quarter in their ancient war on each other. Neither side takes prisoners, and after all these years there's no winner, though rats have survived. The District of Columbia, which has rats aplenty, is deploying a new and lethal weapon with the hope that springs eternal.

A stock trader wears a Dow 25,000 hat, Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018, at the New York Stock Exchange. The Dow Jones industrial average closed above 25,000 points for the first time, just five weeks after its first close above 24,000. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

The market and the economy

A Dow 25,000 was the stuff of fevered fantasy, difficult for the most enthusiastic fan of Donald Trump to imagine on the eve of his inauguration. The Dow was bumping "only" 18,500 on Election Day 2016. But here we are, one year on, and a Dow 25,000 looks to be on the horizon.

Both parties are eyeing a meeting between President Trump and a bipartisan group of congressional negotiators this week as the chance to make progress on an immigration bill, but Democrats have grown increasingly strident in their complaints about the president's stance. (Associated Press/File)

Another ring for the circus

Washington is a circus with many rings. If you're bored with Robert Mueller's pursuit of Donald Trump's Russian friends, which doesn't appear to be going anywhere, there's always a new chapter in the president's verbal duel with Rocket Man in North Korea.

Illustration on the potential for Iranian popular revolt against the current regime by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Rallying to the willing

This is the second round of violent protests by Iranians against their government for suppressing their rights and attempts to enjoy those rights. Barack Obama didn't have much sympathy for the protests against the government suppression of voters in a national election in 2009.

Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck leads on a white horse with fellow police officers during the 129th Rose Parade in Pasadena, Calif., Monday, Jan. 1, 2018. (Walt Mancini/Los Angeles Daily News via AP)

A deadly end to the old year

In a world without villains, an old year would go out like a lamb, punctuated only by accident and disappointment. As if a solemn warning of a very specific kind, the last day of 2017 ended with violence, grief and alarm in a Denver suburb, where a gunman with motives yet unknown ambushed four police officers, killing one of them.

Diversity dies in darkness

With few exceptions, diversity of opinion in Hollywood ranges from left all the way to the far left. Public dedication to diversity is an obsession for "progressives," as liberals now call themselves, but the one form of diversity where it actually makes a difference is diversity of thought. But Hollywood can't allow that.