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Trump allegations nonsense

The resurrection of stale, unsubstantiated sexual-harassment allegations are just the latest attempt to drive President Trump from office. Mr. Trump’s resignation has been called for and demands have been made for an investigation. But there is nothing to investigate. There is merely a desire for smear campaign employing rehashed stories.

Tax meat, dairy for better health?

With the annual tax-filing date just around the corner, pundits are searching for ways to make our tax code fairer and more reflective of our social incentives and burdens. In this regard, there is a growing interest in a tax on meat, eggs and dairy products designed to curb the self-destructive health impacts of the consumption of fatty animal-derived items and effectively compensate society for the associated, devastating environmental impacts.

Hollywood the ultimate in hypocrisy

There is no shame in Hollywood. It is not enough that we are in the midst of an avalanche of sexual-predation revelations, but now Hollywood is pouring accolades and rave reviews on “Call Me By Your Name,” a film that depicts the sensual affair between a 17-year-old boy and 24-year-old man (“Acclaimed film of boy-man love raises hackles in Hollywood,” Web, Dec. 12). There is even talk of an Academy Award nomination for best picture, and the film has garnered three Golden Globe Awards nominations.

Jerusalem move a win for democracy

The Second Intifada, started in 2000, saw the murder of 1,000 Israelis and the self-defense killing of 3,000 Arab terrorists attempting to butcher Israeli civilians. PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat planned the intifada before going to Camp David to meet President Bill Clinton and then Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak. Though they got everything they claimed they wanted (to the West, anyway), Arafat feared that signing an ‘end-of-conflict clause’ would lead to his death. So he went home and launched his suicide bombers.

Amendment rewrite harmful

Bill of Rights Day is this Friday, Dec. 15. It reminds one how far this country has departed from first principles. The 2015 gay marriage ruling complete a rewrite of the First Amendment, which used to say and mean, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press … ” We are familiar with the word “expression,” and it seems an innocuous expansion. However, “expression” enables a nearly unbounded multi-billion-dollar pornography industry.

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Only children can defy perceptions

The Washington Times

"Breaking the 'only child' stereotype mold" (Web, Aug. 11) asserts that only children continue to debunk the myth of being selfish, spoiled and self-centered. As an only child, I can attest to the fact that since my singular entrance into the world, I have experienced bias, which is shattered as individuals get to know me.

Only children can defy perceptions

"Breaking the 'only child' stereotype mold" (Web, Aug. 11) asserts that only children continue to debunk the myth of being selfish, spoiled and self-centered. As an only child, I can attest to the fact that since my singular entrance into the world, I have experienced bias, which is shattered as individuals get to know me.

'Far right' not to blame

As odious as we may find those "white nationalists" or neo-Nazi groups, they were not the responsible parties for the violence in Charlottesville last weekend ("Pence calls white supremacists 'dangerous fringe groups,' defends Trump's call for unity," Web, Aug. 13).

Use social media, but with caution

"Young job hopefuls not hiding their social media past, survey finds" (Web, Aug. 9) claims that young people seeking employment no longer believe their social media will negatively affect job opportunities. As a young person in the job market, I would say this is true, but with hard exceptions.

Statue not an immigrant beacon

In "Not everyone can join the American nation" (Web, Aug. 8) Clifford May argues that CNN's Jim Acosta was wrong to say that Emma Lazarus' poem, "The New Colossus," inscribed on the Statue of Liberty, set a U.S. policy of admitting immigrants considered the "wretched refuse" of foreign lands. Mr. May argues on prudential grounds, but there is a historical argument, too.

No God? No morality

Your Aug. 7 editorial discusses the banality of urban murder, a sign of our secularist times ("'Nobody kill anybody,' but 'nobody' listened," Web). Regarding the epidemic of big-city violence, reference was made to the solemnity of the biblical Sixth Commandment, "Thou shall not kill," but the reality is that the other nine commandments are likewise honored mostly in the breach, in Baltimore and elsewhere. On the streets, life is cheap.

'Fire and fury' diplomacy

Though it wasn't picked up by anyone in the cowering news media, who were busy hiding under their desks when President Trump warned North Korea that if they continued with their provocation, they would face "fire and fury, the likes of which we've never seen before," Mr. Trump was actually testing a little-known theory of his.

Get back to two houses

If President Trump made a blunder during his campaign, it was that he placed all his emphasis on the presidency and did not ask for new Republican members of Congress from the new patriot movement. We sent the same establishment Republicans to Washington, and we are getting the same squishiness and pre-emptive surrender to socialist, statist, totalitarian Democrats we got before.

Empower group to end drug crisis

Forty-five years ago, President Richard Nixon declared drug abuse "public enemy number one" and established a White House special action office to reduce addiction and related deaths. President Trump has called drug abuse a national crisis and signed an executive order establishing the President's Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis. According to the commission's chairman, "to say we have a crisis here is an understatement" and conditions warrant declaration of a state of emergency.

Get rid of RINOs

We currently have a small number of RINOS blocking the president's agenda — and the leadership does nothing. It's time play hardball, stop the talk and take action. First, strip those RINOS of their influential committee and chairmanship assignments. Second, let them know that there will be no Republican funds for them when they run for reelection. Lastly, change the archaic rules of the Senate and let those who oppose know we won, you lost. President Obama did it.

Empower states to end Obamacare

I have followed Obamacare since its inception and now realize its purpose was to empower the federal government with our health care. That didn't work because it violated the Constitution. To reverse Obamacare, the Republicans must do the opposite: empower the states. That should be the premise and theme of the Republican health-care bill.

'War' on police a cry for justice

There is no war on cops ("Why the war on cops is a war on all of us," Web, July 19). There is no "guerrilla action" being taken against our country's police force by the political left. And there is no widespread campaign to paint all law-enforcement officers with the same brush. But there is criticism. And it's largely fair.

GOP losing adherents

The Republican Party and I are done. My friends and I are haggling over whether to un-register ourselves and totally opt out of the system or just sit on the sidelines until hell freezes over and the Republican Party supports its elected president. Absent a change of heart to support the president as the leader of the Party, I am resolved.

Support your president

The recent headlines regarding Republicans backing off support of President Donald Trump are as wrong as the actions of the anti-Trump Republicans themselves. Senators John McCain, Lindsey Graham, Jeff Flake and Mike Lee tried to derail Mr. Trump's nomination at the Republican Convention. Meesrs. McCain, Flake and Graham were part of the 'gang of four' that joined with Democrats to pass the Senate immigration-reform bill against the will of the majority of Republicans.

A health care fit for everyone?

The best solution to Obamacare is to repeal it and not replace it. Get government out of health care and let the free market take care of things. But we all know that will never happen, because once you give someone something for nothing, you have a problem taking it away.

Make students employable again

There has been much talk about the student-loan crisis. There is indeed a crisis, with nearly $1.5 trillion owed. Many of the students who have taken out these loans are not able to repay because they have 'gifted' themselves with degrees in various fashionable fields of so-called 'studies,' fields with no hope of leading to employment in the students' chosen (counselor-suggested) avocation. The solution to this problem is obvious but not easy.

Trump's on-track

Draining the swamp takes time, even if the swamp is in your own backyard. Look how many years the slime had been accumulating. Now we have someone who really cares about America and is doing his best to find the most trustworthy people with whom to surround himself. Gen. John Kelly is the latest such individual, as President Trump fine-tunes his staff, cabinet and administration.

Let market call insurance's future

After just seven years it appears we have a health care crisis because the federal government tried to manipulate and take over the health- insurance industry -- and failed. Now that the Republicans are at the helm of government, it is clear they squandered the past seven years by not having an alternative plan.

Congress, learn from Parliament

As a naturalized American with a strong British heritage, I have watched with increasing amazement the total incompetence of congressional members to avoid what will now become the collapse of the American health-care system.