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Thankful for capitalism

I was born on Chicago’s south side, a stone’s throw from the stockyards, in a melting-pot neighborhood. It was a place that did not have the word poverty in its vernacular. We lived in a cold-water, walk-up apartment quite typical for the type of neighborhood; a four- or five-story, wooden-frame building with four flats opening onto a common hallway on each floor. Our unit didn’t have a front door (it had been missing for longer than any of the residents could recall). The doorway into the hallway was closed off with a patchwork quilt nailed to the upper edge of the door frame, and it extended a foot or so beyond both sides to ensure some privacy.

Manson should’ve been executed

The news that Charles Manson, one of the most vicious, depraved and infamous killers, has died in prison at the ripe old age of 83 causes me to wonder how many millions of dollars have been spent over the past nearly half-century to keep him alive and provide for his needs and desires. These include legal representation for his trial and countless ludicrous and bizarre efforts to argue for parole, his housing, food, health-care needs, and other expenses through which he was a burden.

Players should thank Trump

What were the UCLA basketball players thinking as they were shoplifting merchandise from Louis Vuitton stores in Hangzhou, China? These three could have each gotten a 10-year sentence in a not-so-nice Chinese prison for their moronic stunt. They should thank their lucky stars President Trump was able to work with Chinese president Xi Jinping to secure custody release.

GOP has chance to reform taxes

Too many Republicans excel at joining with Democrats on killing legislation and other critical issues. The Republicans, with a House and Senate majority, have an unprecedented opportunity to pass good, much-needed tax-reform legislation, with a transition period and provision for prompt revision if significant problems occur.

U.S. owes much to Washington, Lee

Being the great-great grandson of a Union soldier who gave the last full measure of devotion to preserve the Union in the bloodiest war in American history, I have a vested interest in the actions of the Alexandria Episcopal Church and the critics of Gen. Kelly’s remarks about the Civil War.

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David Brock: Turncoat for profit

John R. Coyne's review of Sharyl Attkisson's book "The Smear" has flushed another fat rat from the larder of bogus news ("Taking a hard look at the practices and principles of major media," Web, Aug. 9). The recent political metamorphosis of David Brock, of that paragon of modern news Media Matters, is surely a sign of the times.

Charlottesville attack shows divide

I unequivocally condemn the horrific violence in Charlottesville, Va., last weekend at a rally of white nationalists, organized as a backlash against the city's decision to take down a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. It was distressing to watch videos of fists flying between rally members and countering protesters. A terrifying climax was reached when rally attendee James Fields Jr. allegedly plowed a sedan right into a sea of protesters, killing one and injuring at least 19 others.

Only children can defy perceptions

The Washington Times

"Breaking the 'only child' stereotype mold" (Web, Aug. 11) asserts that only children continue to debunk the myth of being selfish, spoiled and self-centered. As an only child, I can attest to the fact that since my singular entrance into the world, I have experienced bias, which is shattered as individuals get to know me.

Only children can defy perceptions

"Breaking the 'only child' stereotype mold" (Web, Aug. 11) asserts that only children continue to debunk the myth of being selfish, spoiled and self-centered. As an only child, I can attest to the fact that since my singular entrance into the world, I have experienced bias, which is shattered as individuals get to know me.

'Far right' not to blame

As odious as we may find those "white nationalists" or neo-Nazi groups, they were not the responsible parties for the violence in Charlottesville last weekend ("Pence calls white supremacists 'dangerous fringe groups,' defends Trump's call for unity," Web, Aug. 13).

Use social media, but with caution

"Young job hopefuls not hiding their social media past, survey finds" (Web, Aug. 9) claims that young people seeking employment no longer believe their social media will negatively affect job opportunities. As a young person in the job market, I would say this is true, but with hard exceptions.

Statue not an immigrant beacon

In "Not everyone can join the American nation" (Web, Aug. 8) Clifford May argues that CNN's Jim Acosta was wrong to say that Emma Lazarus' poem, "The New Colossus," inscribed on the Statue of Liberty, set a U.S. policy of admitting immigrants considered the "wretched refuse" of foreign lands. Mr. May argues on prudential grounds, but there is a historical argument, too.

No God? No morality

Your Aug. 7 editorial discusses the banality of urban murder, a sign of our secularist times ("'Nobody kill anybody,' but 'nobody' listened," Web). Regarding the epidemic of big-city violence, reference was made to the solemnity of the biblical Sixth Commandment, "Thou shall not kill," but the reality is that the other nine commandments are likewise honored mostly in the breach, in Baltimore and elsewhere. On the streets, life is cheap.

'Fire and fury' diplomacy

Though it wasn't picked up by anyone in the cowering news media, who were busy hiding under their desks when President Trump warned North Korea that if they continued with their provocation, they would face "fire and fury, the likes of which we've never seen before," Mr. Trump was actually testing a little-known theory of his.

Get back to two houses

If President Trump made a blunder during his campaign, it was that he placed all his emphasis on the presidency and did not ask for new Republican members of Congress from the new patriot movement. We sent the same establishment Republicans to Washington, and we are getting the same squishiness and pre-emptive surrender to socialist, statist, totalitarian Democrats we got before.

Empower group to end drug crisis

Forty-five years ago, President Richard Nixon declared drug abuse "public enemy number one" and established a White House special action office to reduce addiction and related deaths. President Trump has called drug abuse a national crisis and signed an executive order establishing the President's Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis. According to the commission's chairman, "to say we have a crisis here is an understatement" and conditions warrant declaration of a state of emergency.

Get rid of RINOs

We currently have a small number of RINOS blocking the president's agenda — and the leadership does nothing. It's time play hardball, stop the talk and take action. First, strip those RINOS of their influential committee and chairmanship assignments. Second, let them know that there will be no Republican funds for them when they run for reelection. Lastly, change the archaic rules of the Senate and let those who oppose know we won, you lost. President Obama did it.

Empower states to end Obamacare

I have followed Obamacare since its inception and now realize its purpose was to empower the federal government with our health care. That didn't work because it violated the Constitution. To reverse Obamacare, the Republicans must do the opposite: empower the states. That should be the premise and theme of the Republican health-care bill.

'War' on police a cry for justice

There is no war on cops ("Why the war on cops is a war on all of us," Web, July 19). There is no "guerrilla action" being taken against our country's police force by the political left. And there is no widespread campaign to paint all law-enforcement officers with the same brush. But there is criticism. And it's largely fair.

GOP losing adherents

The Republican Party and I are done. My friends and I are haggling over whether to un-register ourselves and totally opt out of the system or just sit on the sidelines until hell freezes over and the Republican Party supports its elected president. Absent a change of heart to support the president as the leader of the Party, I am resolved.

Support your president

The recent headlines regarding Republicans backing off support of President Donald Trump are as wrong as the actions of the anti-Trump Republicans themselves. Senators John McCain, Lindsey Graham, Jeff Flake and Mike Lee tried to derail Mr. Trump's nomination at the Republican Convention. Meesrs. McCain, Flake and Graham were part of the 'gang of four' that joined with Democrats to pass the Senate immigration-reform bill against the will of the majority of Republicans.

A health care fit for everyone?

The best solution to Obamacare is to repeal it and not replace it. Get government out of health care and let the free market take care of things. But we all know that will never happen, because once you give someone something for nothing, you have a problem taking it away.

Make students employable again

There has been much talk about the student-loan crisis. There is indeed a crisis, with nearly $1.5 trillion owed. Many of the students who have taken out these loans are not able to repay because they have 'gifted' themselves with degrees in various fashionable fields of so-called 'studies,' fields with no hope of leading to employment in the students' chosen (counselor-suggested) avocation. The solution to this problem is obvious but not easy.