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Immigration Reform

The latest news, analysis and debates on immigration reform and policy.

Mexico's new President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador greets the crowd at the end of his inaugural ceremony at the National Congress in Mexico City, Saturday, Dec. 1, 2018. Mexicans are getting more than just a new president Saturday. The inauguration of Lopez Obrador will mark a turning point in one of the world's most radical experiments in opening markets and privatization. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

Mexico's new president signs deal to stop migrants

By Associated Press

In one of his first acts in office, Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has signed an agreement with his counterparts from three Central American countries to establish a development plan to stem the flow of migrants seeking asylum in the U.S. Published December 2, 2018

Recent Stories

Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Kevin McAleenan is sworn in before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on 'Oversight of U.S. Customs and Border Protection' on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Top border security official defends using tear gas on migrant caravan

- Associated Press

The nation's top border security official told skeptical senators Tuesday that the use of tear gas on a group of migrants that included children was justified to manage a chaotic clash where a crowd was hurling rocks at agents and trying to illegally cross into the U.S.

Migrant family members move into a hole to cross under the U.S. border wall, aided by two local guides, in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, Dec. 9, 2018. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall illegally and hand themselves in to Border Patrol agents to request asylum. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

More than 3,000 illegals caught in one day: DHS

- The Washington Times

The government snared more than 3,000 immigrants who illegally attempting to cross into the U.S. in just one day last week, the Trump administration's top border official told Congress on Tuesday, saying the situation qualifies as a full-blown "crisis."

A Honduran migrant and her daughter stand on the beach looking toward the U.S. border wall, moments before suddenly squeezing through a gap and pushing through fencing to emerge on U.S. soil, in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, Dec. 9, 2018. Discouraged by the long wait to apply for asylum through official ports of entry, many Central American migrants from recent caravans are choosing to cross the U.S. border wall illegally and hand themselves in to Border Patrol agents to request asylum. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Asylum claims soar 67 percent at U.S. border

- The Washington Times

The number of migrants demanding asylum at the U.S. border soared 67 percent in 2018, Homeland Security officials said Monday, swamping an already overloaded system and fueling a testy debate on Capitol Hill over how the government is responding.

A DEA agent shows a gun allegedly seized from a suspected drug dealer after his arrest during a raid on a public housing project in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, Friday, July 9, 2010. Hundreds of U.S. drug agents and Puerto Rican police swept through public housing projects on the island's west coast in an attempt to dismantle drug trafficking gangs and reduce crime in Mayaguez, the host city of the XXI Central American and Caribbean Games that will be inaugurated on July 17. (AP Photo/Andres Leighton)

DEA agent charged with facilitating drug shipments

Associated Press

A criminal complaint says a DEA agent traded inside information for bribes which helped facilitate drug shipments to north Florida and Arkansas. The complaint obtained this week by First Coast News in Jacksonville says Special Agent Nathan Koen warned dealers of pending investigations in exchange for money and enabled shipments of drugs worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Migrants are escorted by a U.S. Border Patrol agent as they are detained after climbing over the border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, to San Ysidro, Calif., Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. Thousands of Central American migrants who traveled with recent caravans want to seek asylum in the U.S. but face a decision between crossing illegally or waiting months, because the U.S. government only processes a limited number of those cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Illegal immigrant families shatter records in November

- The Washington Times

Illegal immigration ticked up in November, but the number of those people traveling as families shattered records, Homeland Security reported Thursday, saying it's proof that migrants have figured out how to game the flawed U.S. immigration system.

Migrants traveling with children walk up a hill to a waiting U.S. Border Patrol agent just inside San Ysidro, Calif., after climbing over the border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. Thousands of Central American migrants who traveled with recent caravans want to seek asylum in the United States but face a decision between crossing illegally or waiting months, because the U.S. government only processes a limited number of those cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

81 migrant children separated from parents since June

- Associated Press

The Trump administration separated 81 migrant children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border since the June executive order that stopped the general practice amid a crackdown on illegal crossings, according to government data obtained by The Associated Press.

FILE - This file photo provided by the Webb County Sheriff's Office shows U.S. Border Patrol agent Juan David Ortiz. Ortiz, who confessed to shooting four women in the head and leaving their bodies on rural Texas roadsides, was indicted Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018, on a capital murder charge.  (Webb County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)

Border Patrol agent charged with capital murder

Associated Press

A U.S. Border Patrol agent who confessed to shooting four women in the head and leaving their bodies on rural Texas roadsides has been indicted on a capital murder charge, a prosecutor said Wednesday.

Mexican police run as they try to keep migrants from getting past the Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018, near San Ysidro, California. The mayor of Tijuana has declared a humanitarian crisis in his border city and says that he has asked the United Nations for aid to deal with the approximately 5,000 Central American migrants who have arrived in the city. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

Caravan migrants won't face charges in border clash

- Associated Press

No criminal charges will be filed against any of the 42 people associated with a caravan of Central American migrants who were arrested in a clash that ended with U.S. authorities firing tear gas into Mexico, The Associated Press has learned.

In this Nov. 22, 2018, photo, Mexican President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador listens during a meeting in Mexico City. Migrants, trade, crime, the border wall: The challenges to the modern U.S.-Mexico relationship have perhaps never been as stark and divisive as they are now, at a critical juncture for both countries. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell, File)

U.S. and Mexico face stark choices as new president takes over

- Associated Press

Migrants, trade, crime, the border wall: The challenges to the modern U.S.-Mexico relationship have perhaps never been as stark and divisive as they are now, at a critical juncture for both countries.

Caravan mostly standard illegal immigrants, not refugees fleeing violence

- The Washington Times

The Central Americans surging into the U.S. and claiming asylum look a lot more like regular illegal immigrants, eager for better jobs or to reunite with families, than traditional refugees fleeing persecution or violence back home, according to a new report Wednesday that challenges conventional wisdom on the migrants' motives.

U.S. nixed FBI checks on staff at migrant teen detention camp

- Associated Press

The Trump administration announced in June it would open a temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers -- and it shows every sign of becoming more permanent.

A migrant runs from tear gas launched by U.S. agents, amid members of the press covering the Mexico-U.S. border, after a group of migrants got past Mexican police at the Chaparral crossing in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018. The mayor of Tijuana has declared a humanitarian crisis in his border city and says that he has asked the United Nations for aid to deal with the approximately 5,000 Central American migrants who have arrived in the city.  (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

Tear gas used once a month at border under Obama

- The Washington Times

The same tear gas agent that the Trump administration is taking heat for deploying against a border mob this weekend is actually used fairly frequently -- including more than once a month during some years under President Obama, according to Homeland Security data.

A migrant carries a child past Mexican police who stand guard outside the Benito Juarez Sports Center which is serving as a shelter for migrants in Tijuana, Mexico, Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. The mayor of Tijuana has declared a humanitarian crisis in his border city and says that he has asked the United Nations for aid to deal with thousands of Central American migrants who have arrived. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

Caravan migrants reconsider asylum claims after border clash

- Associated Press

A chaotic border clash with choking tear gas fired by U.S. agents left Central American migrants sullen and dejected, with some opting Monday to leave and others worrying the incident may have spoiled their chances at asylum.

Recent Opinion Columns

Immigration Reform Gridlock Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ending the gridlock on immigration reform

Rejection of the House Republicans' "compromise" immigration proposal late last month (June 27) by a lopsided 121-301 margin was seen as a fatal blow to current reform efforts. To the contrary, it may be exactly what was needed to end the decades-long gridlock on immigration reform, if members of Congress learn the right lesson from the failure.

Melting the Ice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why ICE must not be abolished

Kate Steinle was shot and killed on a San Francisco pier three years ago this month. Her death came at the hands of an illegal alien who had been previously deported five times and was a convicted felon. It also ignited a national discussion about sanctuary city policies that is still going. Unfortunately, Democrats' new proposal to abolish the department of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is moving the immigration debate in an unhealthy direction.

From The Vault

President Donald Trump speaks about immigration at the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, Friday, June 22, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump hosts 'Angel Families' to highlight crime by illegal immigrants

- The Washington Times

President Trump highlighted "American victims of illegal immigration" on Friday, hosting families of people killed by people who immigrated to the U.S. illegally to tell their stories and hitting back at critics of his rescinded policy that separated some children from their parents who crossed the border illegally.

Amina Olow, a refugee from Somalia, looks at photos of two of her eldest daughters while siting with two of her other children in her Columbus, Ohio, home on Friday, Feb. 23, 2018. The girls, Neemotallah, now 13, and Nastexo, now 10, live in Kenya with other family members. It has been 10 years since their mother has seen them. "I never thought it would be this long," Olow says of her separation from her daughters, who she hopes can join her despite the fact that Somalia is on a list of countries impacted by the Trump administration travel ban. (AP Photo/Martha Irvine)

Trump on pace for record low number of refugees

- The Washington Times

The Trump administration has resettled slightly more than 10,000 refugees as it nears the midpoint of the fiscal year, putting it on pace for by far the lowest total since the modern system was established nearly four decades ago.

In this Thursday, Feb. 7, 2008, file photo Manuel Rendon, center in white, along with fellow members, recite the Pledge of Allegiance at a meeting of the Collin County LULAC Young Adults Council #4780 at Collin County Community College in Plano, Texas. The oldest Latino civil rights organization in the U.S. is facing turmoil over its leader's initial support for President Donald Trump's immigration plan and it comes amid evolving membership. League of United Latin American Citizens members are pressuring President Roger Rocha to resign after he wrote a letter in support of Trump's proposal on increased border security. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez,File)

Court orders restoration of DACA program

- The Washington Times

A federal judge in New York ruled Tuesday that the government must restart the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals deportation amnesty, adding more weight to the legal case against President Trump's phaseout of the program just as Congress is debating the fate of "Dreamers" on Capitol Hill.

Opponents of President Trump say it is beyond the power of any president to pardon a public official who violated the Constitution and accuses him of bullying. (Associated Press)

Arpaio pardon still rubs Trump opponents wrong

- The Washington Times

President Trump used his pardon powers sparingly in his first year in office, but one he did issue remains intensely controversial, with some of his political opponents now asking a federal appeals court to rule it invalid.

As envisioned by President Trump, some 32 miles of new wall will be built in the Border Patrol's Rio Grande Valley sector at a price of $784 million, or $24.5 million per mile. (Associated Press/File)

Illegal immigration plummets after Trump inauguration

- The Washington Times

Illegal immigration across the southwest border is down more than 60 percent so far under President Trump, officials revealed Tuesday, even before the first new agent is hired or the first mile of his promised border wall is constructed.

A biometric entry-exit system at U.S. ports has been required by law for years but has been difficult to build. (Associated Press/File)

Deportation agency ignored 1.6 million visa overstays under Obama

- The Washington Times

The government flagged more than 1.6 million foreign visitors for overstaying their visas from 2013 to 2015, but deportation agents said they fell too low on President Obama's list of priorities to bother targeting for removal, according to a watchdog report released Monday.

 In this June 22, 2016, file photo, Border Patrol agent Eduardo Olmos walks near the secondary fence separating Tijuana, Mexico, background, and San Diego in San Diego. U.S. President Donald Trump will direct the Homeland Security Department to start building a wall at the Mexican border. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, file)

Feds say border fence has been cut 9,200 times since 2010

- The Washington Times

The wrong type of border wall could actually make Border Patrol agents less safe, according to a new report Thursday from the government's chief watchdog, which said walls that block lines of sight can become ambush sites for attackers looking to get the drop on agents.

President Donald Trump holds up an executive order for border security and immigration enforcement improvements after signing the order during a visit to the Homeland Security Department headquarters in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump eviscerates Obama's immigration policy in two executive orders

- The Washington Times

With a couple strokes of his pen, President Trump wiped out almost all of President Obama's immigration policies Wednesday, laying the groundwork for his own border wall, unleashing immigration agents to enforce the law and punishing sanctuary cities who try to thwart his deportation surge.