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Homeland & Cybersecurity

The latest coverage of the Department of Homeland Security and cyber threats around the globe.

(Associated Press/File)

Espionage campaign targets U.S. sectors using malware tied to Chinese hackers: Report

By Andrew Blake - The Washington Times

Critical industries in the United States and abroad have been targeted recently by a cyber-espionage campaign waged with computer code previously traced to the Chinese military, but security researchers analyzing the latest activity are skeptical of solely blaming the same state-sponsored hacking group as before. Published October 18, 2018

Recent Stories

A man works at his desk in the war room, where Facebook monitors election related content on the platform, in Menlo Park, Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Facebook's election 'war room' takes aim at fake information

- Associated Press

In an otherwise innocuous part of Facebook's expansive Silicon Valley campus, a locked door bears a taped-on sign that reads "War Room." Behind the door lies a nerve center the social network has set up to combat fake accounts and bogus news stories ahead of upcoming elections.

M-16A2 Assault Rifle - U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jerry Sexton fires the M-16A2 rifle during reflex shooting training, which is the ability to react quickly and accurately to an immediate enemy threat, during the Patriot exercise at Fort McCoy, Wis., July 16, 2008. Patriot is an annual exercise held across the United States that increases the warfighting capabilities of the National Guard and the reserve and active components of the United States Air Force and Army. The participation of Canadian, United Kingdom and Dutch forces increases combined effectiveness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Matthew Smith/Released) ** FILE **

Army gears up for info warfare

The Army this month outlined its plan for using modern-day information warfare in future military conflicts as part of new, high-technology warfighting capabilities.

The two-faced scourge of cyberwarfare

Speaking to the U.N. General Assembly last week, Qatari Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al-Thani promised that his country would soon hold an international conference on the scourge of hacking and cyberwarfare.

(Image: Screen grab from FBI wanted poster)

U.S. indicts seven Russians for hacking anti-doping agencies

- The Washington Times

Russian intelligence hackers ran a massive four-year disinformation campaign in which they obtained sensitive information from targets that included the world's leading soccer organization, the World Anti-Doping Agency and the Democratic Party, the Justice Department said Thursday in a coordinated legal offensive with allied Western governments against Russian cyber operations.

Shawn Gu and Julia Jiang, both of Beijing, take cell phone photographs using a light adaptor, Friday Sept. 28, 2018, in front of the U.S. Capitol during sunset in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) ** FILE **

Democratic operative charged with 'doxxing' senators

- The Washington Times

Jackson Cosko, the Democratic staffer accused of "doxing" Republican senators during the Kavanaugh confirmation fight, was caught after he sneaked into a Senate Democrat's office this week and tried to use a computer, police said in an affidavit made public Thursday.

Human rights activist Ahmed Mansoor shows Associated Press journalists a screenshot of a spoof text message he received in Ajman, United Arab Emirates, on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016. Mansoor was recently targeted by spyware that can hack into Apple's iPhone handset. The company said Thursday it was updated its security. The text message reads: "New secrets on the torture of Emirati citizens in jail." (AP Photo/Jon Gambrell)

Israeli spyware found on phones in 45 countries, U.S. included

- The Washington Times

Cellphone spyware sold by an Israeli security firm is suspected of being used against targets in dozens of countries including the United States, researchers warned Tuesday, raising concerns and questions about topics ranging from eavesdropping to export control.

WikiLeaks denies Julian Assange sought Russian visa

- The Washington Times

WikiLeaks has denied publisher Julian Assange sought a visa from Russia, disputing a recently leaked letter written to Moscow's consulate in London shortly after the website first started releasing classified U.S. diplomatic documents.

In this Jan. 11, 2011, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrives at Belmarsh Magistrate's court in London for an extradition hearing. According to a cache of internal WikiLeaks files obtained by The Associated Press, Assange sought a Russian visa and staffers at his radical transparency group discussed having him skip bail and escape Britain as authorities closed in on him in late 2010. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)

New leak shows Julian Assange sought Russian visa in 2010

- Associated Press

Julian Assange had just pulled off one of the biggest scoops in journalistic history, splaying the innards of American diplomacy across the web. But technology firms were cutting ties to his website, WikiLeaks, cable news pundits were calling for his head and a Swedish sex crime case was threatening to put him behind bars.

President Donald Trump greets Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi upon his arrival to the White House in Washington, Monday, March 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Iraq reneges on travel ban deal with Trump, refuses to accept deportees

- The Washington Times

Iraq was the first country to earn its way off President Trump's travel ban last year, after the administration said it wanted to thank the Muslim nation for agreeing to start taking back its deportees whom the U.S. was trying to oust. But evidence has emerged suggesting that either Iraq has backslid or the deal was never what the administration said it was in the first place.

Naval Security Strategy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Right thinking on grand strategy

In the pages of World Affairs from 2015, I wrote an article that condemned the then-contemporary strategic thinking as being anything but strategic. The American national security establishment's obsession with counter-terrorism and counter-insurgency is going to come back to haunt us since great power conflict never ceases.

Workers wearing yellow hard hats are seen at upper right from the air Saturday, Aug. 11, 2018, near Steilacoom, Wash., at the site on Ketron Island in Washington state where an Horizon Air turboprop plane crashed Friday after it was stolen from Sea-Tac International Airport. Investigators were working to find out how an airline employee stole the plane and crashed it after being chased by military jets that were quickly scrambled to intercept the aircraft. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

'Insider threat': Plane theft illustrates potential for airline employee mayhem

- Associated Press

The theft of an empty plane by an airline worker who performed dangerous loops before crashing into a remote island in Puget Sound illustrated what aviation experts have long known: One of the biggest potential perils for commercial air travel is airline or airport employees causing mayhem.

In this Wednesday, April 19, 2017, file photo, Alex Jones, a right-wing radio host and conspiracy theorist, arrives for a child custody trial at the Heman Marion Sweatt Travis County Courthouse in Austin, Texas. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)

Alex Jones winning: He's now more popular than ever

- The Washington Times

Alex Jones of Infowars has been booted from YouTube, Apple, Spotify and Facebook for what the tech giants consider his rampant hate speech. And with that, Jones has become the face of the censorship fight. This seems counterproductive to those who would silence him, yes?

Alex Jones, center, an American conspiracy theorist and radio show host, is escorted out of a crowd of protesters after he said he was attacked in Public Square on Tuesday, July 19, 2016, in Cleveland, during the second day of the Republican convention. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Alex Jones shutdown ignites debate over social media content policing, censorship

- The Washington Times

Facebook and YouTube shut down accounts Monday run by radio host Alex Jones, saying his charged rhetoric violated their policies and were detracting from their efforts to spawn a civil conversation. Apple also said it nixed Mr. Jones' podcast from its iTunes subscription lists, and Spotify erased the host's program from its feed, as social media companies began to take a more active role in policing their content.

Recent Opinion Columns

Caitlin Sanger, of Franklin Park, N.J., pauses to cry outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 26, 2018, as she speaks about her father being detained by ICE and protests immigrant families being split up. Naomi Liem, 10, of Franklin Park, N.J., cries lower right and Jocelyn Pangemanan of Highland Park, N.J., stands right. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A needed tutorial in the law

The U.S. Supreme Court had a lesson Tuesday for the good-hearted folk who would apply feelings instead of the Constitution to the interpretation of the law. By the familiar 5 to 4 vote on constitutional issues, the High Court upheld the clear language of Congress in support of President Trump's order limiting the entry of risky foreign nationals to the United States.

Illustration on Federal contracting by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Protecting the Pentagon's cloud data

Alexa, how do we get competition? When Democrats rule D.C., you have to hand it to them. They know how to take care of their fellow Democrats. When Republicans rule D.C., they take care of the Democrats, too.

Removing Obama Net Neutrality Regulations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Restoring a light touch to Internet regulations

Over the last two weeks, there has been a vigorous debate about internet regulation. Under the plan I recently proposed, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) would restore internet freedom by rolling back heavy-handed government regulations imposed during the Obama administration. Some have tried to whip Americans into a frenzy by making outlandish claims. Feeding the hysteria are silly accusations that the plan will "end the internet as we know it" or threaten American democracy itself.

Erasing Radical Ideology Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Marshall Plan to defeat global terrorism

Global terrorism is spreading like a dangerous cancer that knows no borders. It cannot be defeated by the military alone. As the Islamic State's grip on Mosul is faltering today, so must its grip on the young minds of Iraq through instruction in religious freedom and reconciliation.

Cyber Warfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Warfare goes digital in the 21st century

Russia's intelligence service hacks Democratic Party computer networks and puts out stolen emails in a bid to influence the 2016 election. China says it owns 90 percent of the South China Sea and begins building military bases under a vague historical claim to the strategic waterway. Iranian hackers break into American banks and a water control computer network at an upstate New York dam. Welcome to the new form of conflict in the 21st century: information warfare.

Trump Claims of Eavesdropping of His Campaign Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tweets and trials

Two of the government's highest ranking intelligence officials will go before a House committee next week to testify about President Trump's bombastic claim that his predecessor "tapped" his phones during the 2016 election.

President Donald Trump arrives for a St. Patrick's Day reception in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, March 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Mr. Trump's travel ban

President Trump and the lower federal courts are playing a dangerous game of ping-pong, and the nation's security is paying for it. The president, who is responsible for the nation's safety, proposes and certain federal judges, who have no such responsibility dispose. The president proposes again, and again a judge or two dispose.

From The Vault

China cyber spy chief revealed

The activities of one of China's cyber spymasters has been revealed for the first time in a government report on Beijing's unfair trade practices made public last week.

Huma Abedin, one of Hillary Clinton's top aides from her time in the State Department and again on the campaign trail, had shared the laptop with now-estranged husband Anthony Weiner. (Associated Press)

FBI feared Huma Abedin's laptop had been hacked, contained secret emails

- The Washington Times

The FBI believed Huma Abedin's laptop computer did have evidence she and her boss, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, mishandled classified information, according to a search warrant released Tuesday that shows the basis agents had for upending the presidential election with their controversial election-season probe.

In this July 25, 2016, file photo, John Podesta, Clinton Campaign Chairman, speaks during the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Podesta, a top adviser to Hillary Clinton, on Tuesday, Oct. 11, accused Roger Stone, a longtime Donald Trump aide, of receiving "advance warning" about WikiLeaks' plans to publish thousands of hacked emails and suggested the Republican candidate is aiding the unprecedented Russian interference in American politics. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

John Podesta links Donald Trump's campaign to Russian email hacking

- Associated Press

Hillary Clinton's top adviser said the FBI is investigating Russia's possible role in hacking thousands of his personal emails, an intrusion he said Donald Trump's campaign may have been aware of in advance.