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Everett Piper

Everett Piper

Everett Piper, is president of Oklahoma Wesleyan University and author of “Not A Day Care: The Devastating Consequences of Abandoning Truth."

Articles by Everett Piper

Anthony Bourdain Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The despair of Anthony Bourdain

In the early 1900s, G.K. Chesterton spoke of the unavoidable consequences of denying God as our Creator and worshipping science above the sacred. Observing that the naturalists of his day were only too willing to turn their science into a philosophy and then impose their new religion upon all of culture with near fanatic zeal, Chesterton said, "I [have] never said a word against eminent men of science. What I complain of is a vague popular philosophy which supposes itself to be scientific when it is really nothing but a sort of new religion and an uncommonly nasty one." Published June 17, 2018

Illustration on "gay Christianity" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wolves in shepherd's clothing

A bit of news you may have missed over the past couple weeks was that of about 2,000 high-profile Christian pastors and church elders who, on May 24, marched on the White House. Published June 10, 2018

Illustration of King Diversity by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Delusions of diversity

Delusion reigns in the mind of Lord Diversity and his minions. He demands tolerance while declaring he will not tolerate the intolerant. He requires openness of mind but closes his mind to all who disagree. His Majesty Diversity, after all, says it is true that nothing is true. He knows nothing can be known, he is sure that nothing is sure, and he is absolutely confident that no one can have confidence in absolutes. Published June 3, 2018

Illustration on President Trump's pro-life stance by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wrong about Donald Trump

Two years ago, as I sat in the chambers of the U.S. Supreme Court, I was crestfallen. Oklahoma Wesleyan's lawsuit against Obamacare and its unjust abortifacient mandate — a mandate that forced my university, under threat of law, to include abortion-inducing drugs in our health insurance package — hung in the balance. Justice Antonin Scalia had just died. All hope for a majority ruling in favor of our religious freedom seemed lost. Published May 27, 2018

University Goat Petting Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pursuing God, or petting goats

It is finals week at colleges and universities across the nation, and the University of Maine at Orono just announced a brilliant plan: It is providing a herd of goats for students to feed and pet in order to help them — presumably the students, not the goats — get through the stress of final exams. Published May 20, 2018

Illustration on teaching in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A professor's prayer

Wednesday, May 3, was our country's National Day of Prayer. It was a day where millions of Americans gathered at various venues in various communities petitioning God for his forgiveness, protection and providence. Published May 6, 2018

Illustration on the hidden curriculum found in many Christian colleges by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What college campuses can reveal

D. Michael Lindsay, president of Gordon College, wrote recently in an article that he penned for The Gospel Coalition, "Every higher education institution has a [hidden curriculum]. It's not the catchy slogan emblazoned on campus merchandise, and it's not necessarily in an admissions counselor's spiel. Published April 29, 2018

The Sun and the Lion Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Escaping the Underworld

In "The Silver Chair," the fifth book in the "Chronicles of Narnia" series, we follow three main characters, two children named Scrubb and Jill and a Narnian friend called Puddleglum, as they venture into a dark underground world in search of Rilian the Prince of Narnia who is being held captive by none other than an evil witch. Published April 1, 2018

Leaders of a Mississippi college town voted Tuesday to permit a gay pride parade, reversing a previous denial and moving to defuse a lawsuit alleging discrimination and free speech violations. (Associated Press)

Love is love, or is it?

Two weeks ago, I wrote a column titled "Conversations About Sex." In this article, I asked this basic question: If our culture has decided there is no such thing as an objective moral standard pertaining to sexual behavior then on what basis can we make any moral judgments about any behavior? Published March 25, 2018

Illustration on GOP obstruction of protection for religious liberty in Oklahoma by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Honest and dishonest devils

On March 15, Oklahoma's Senate was scheduled to vote on SB 197, the Protection of Freedom of Conscience Act. This act sought to codify into law the rights and protections of all Oklahomans to express and practice their religion freely in the public square without fear of government penalty or government coercion. The Oklahoma Senate is composed of 48 members, 40 of which are currently Republican. Published March 18, 2018

FILE - In this Jan. 14, 2016 file photo, runners make their way along a sidewalk on the campus of Wheaton College in Norton, Mass. Wheaton is getting a $10 million donation in 2018 from the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation, a conservative backer whose namesake is a Wheaton alumna. The gift will create an endowed professorship on social entrepreneurship and new space for existing programs on the topic. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

'Who are you to judge?'

"The Lottery" is a classic short story written by Shirley Jackson in 1948. It's the tale of a rural, farming community in America of about three hundred residents. The town seems normal by all accounts as it prepares for a traditional, harvest-time event known as The Lottery. Published March 11, 2018

Illustration on tolerance for sexual perversion by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Conversations about sex

As a college president, I'd argue there are some things that should be confronted, some that should be confessed and some about which we can have a conversation. As a teacher, it is my goal to produce students who are able to distinguish between these three categories. Published March 4, 2018

Illustration on OKWU court victory over the Obama Administration's Department of Education by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When David beat Goliath, once more

In 2011, every college and university in the United States received a "guidance letter" from the Obama administration's Department of Education declaring that all colleges and universities across the land, from Brown to Berkeley, were required to immediately amend their policies and procedures for responding to any claims of sexual harassment and sexual assault on their respective campuses. Published February 25, 2018

Logical Progression of a Gun Ban Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

More laws do not a moral people make

This past Valentine's Day, Nikolas Cruz entered a classroom in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and proceeded to murder 17 people and wound 15 others. Before any meaningful criminal investigation could even begin, our nation's cultural elites rushed to their respective podiums, finding fault and casting aspersions. Scoring political points is the name of the game. Removing personal rights embedded in our Constitution and replacing them with more laws and less freedom seems to be the only way they know to keep score. Published February 18, 2018

File - In this Friday, Oct. 19, 2012 file photo, students study in a library on the campus of California State University, Long Beach in Long Beach, Calif. California State University is considering raising tuition in 2018-19 for the second straight year, a move trustees say would be a last resort if the state does not chip in more funding for the country's largest university system. The Board of Trustees said Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, that Gov. Jerry Brown's proposed state budget, released earlier this month, allocates a fraction of what the system's 23 campuses need to maintain their quality of education at a time of record-high enrollment. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

First and second things, character and color

C.S. Lewis told us in "God in the Dock": "Put first things first and second things are thrown in. Put second things first and you lose both first and second things." In his publication titled First Things, Richard John Neuhaus warned, "One must never underestimate the profound bigotry and anti-intellectualism [of second things]." Published February 11, 2018

(Image: Screen grab of the cover of Cosmopolitan)

George Orwell called, and he wants his royalties

Have we completely lost our minds? In a word: Yes. Cosmopolitan Magazine has released its February issue, featuring the most recent transgender poster child Laverne Cox on its cover. There is so much wrong on this one page that it makes one's head spin. Published February 4, 2018

Illustration on the divine path by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Walking in God's image

As the president of one of the dozens of universities in the United States that carry the "Wesleyan" name I have often been asked: "What's a Wesleyan?" Likewise, hardly a day goes by where I am not asked what seems to be one of the most seminal questions of our time: How should the church respond to our society's tsunamic shift toward the celebration and acceptance of the broader LGBTQ agenda? Published January 28, 2018