Ed Mcmahon - Bio, News, Photos - Washington Times
Skip to content

Ed Mcmahon

Latest Stories

AP_03082702220

AP_03082702220

Entertainer Ed McMahon hoped to become a United States Marine Corps fighter pilot. Prior to the US entry into World War II, however, both the Army and Navy required two years of college for their pilots program. McMahon enrolled into classes at Boston College and studied there from 1940-41. After Pearl Harbor was attacked, the college requirement was dropped, and McMahon immediately applied for Marine flight training. His primary flight training was in Dallas, followed by fighter training in Pensacola, where he also earned his carrier landing qualifications. He was a Marine Corps flight instructor for two years, finally being ordered to the Pacific fleet in 1945. However, his orders were canceled after the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki forcing Japan's surrender. As an officer in the reserves, McMahon was recalled to active duty during the Korean War. This time, he flew the OE-1, an unarmed single-engine spotter plane. He functioned as an artillery spotter for the Marine batteries on the ground and as a forward controller for the Navy and Marine fighter bombers. He flew a total of 85 combat missions, earning six Air Medals. After the war, he stayed with the Marines, as a reserve officer, retiring in 1966 as a colonel

AP03082708812

AP03082708812

Ed McMahon hoped to become a United States Marine Corps fighter pilot. Prior to the US entry into World War II, however, both the Army and Navy required two years of college for their pilots program. McMahon enrolled into classes at Boston College and studied there from 1940-41. After Pearl Harbor was attacked, the college requirement was dropped, and McMahon immediately applied for Marine flight training. His primary flight training was in Dallas, followed by fighter training in Pensacola, where he also earned his carrier landing qualifications. He was a Marine Corps flight instructor for two years, finally being ordered to the Pacific fleet in 1945. However, his orders were canceled after the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki forcing Japan's surrender. As an officer in the reserves, McMahon was recalled to active duty during the Korean War. This time, he flew the OE-1, an unarmed single-engine spotter plane. He functioned as an artillery spotter for the Marine batteries on the ground and as a forward controller for the Navy and Marine fighter bombers. He flew a total of 85 combat missions, earning six Air Medals. After the war, he stayed with the Marines, as a reserve officer, retiring in 1966 as a colonel. In 1982 he received a state commission as a brigadier general in the California Air National Guard, an honorific awarded to recognize his support for the National Guard and Reserves. In this Aug. 27, 2003 file photo, entertainer Ed McMahon waves to the media upon arriving at "The Bob Hope Memorial Tribute" at the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in the North Hollywood section of Los Angeles. McMahon died, Tuesday, June 23, 2009, at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center surrounded by his wife, Pam, and other family members, said his publicist, Howard Bragman. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, file)

2_5_2014_ap9307300968201.jpg

2_5_2014_ap9307300968201.jpg

FILE - In this July 30, 1993 file photo, Ed McMahon, left, former announcer of the "Tonight Show," looks on as "Tonight Show" host Jay Leno breaks into laughter during the taping of the show in Burbank, Calif. McMahon, the loyal "Tonight Show" sidekick who bolstered boss Johnny Carson with guffaws and a resounding "H-e-e-e-e-e-ere's Johnny!" for 30 years, has died at a Los Angeles hospital. He was 86. (AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian, file)

20120513-160408-pic-916356703.jpg

20120513-160408-pic-916356703.jpg

Johnny Carson, with sidekick Ed McMahon (left), reigned for nearly 30 years on late-night TV. His nightly viewership, averaging as much as 15 million, was more than the current audience of "Tonight" successor Jay Leno and CBS rival David Letterman combined. (Associated Press)