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Sanjay Gupta.jpg

Sanjay Gupta.jpg

CNN's chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta disputed President Trump's clean bill of health this week, claiming that the numbers actually suggest the president has heart disease. (CNN)

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1_162018_trump8201.jpg

An aggressive press has been around for a while. Here, then-presidential hopeful Donald Trump faces a wall of journalists on the 2016 campaign trail. The relationship hasn't improved at all. (Associated Press)

Matt Damon.jpg

Matt Damon.jpg

Matt Damon apologized on the "Today" show Tuesday after his comments on sexual harassment drew backlash one month ago. (NBC)

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1_152018_ap-162697567356418201.jpg

Talk show host Rush Limbaugh argued on his show that the media reaction to President Trump's controversial expletive remarks about certain countries is manufactured. He called the anchors "actors." (Associated Press)

Sharon Stone.jpg

Sharon Stone.jpg

Actress Sharon Stone discusses her career during a Jan. 14, 2018, interview on "CBS Sunday Morning." (Image: CBS screenshot)

U571

U571

U-571 (2000) directed by Jonathan Mostow and starring Matthew McConaughey, Bill Paxton, Harvey Keitel, Thomas Kretschmann, Jon Bon Jovi, Jack Noseworthy, Will Estes and Tom Guiry. In 1942, a World War II German submarine is boarded by United States Navy submariners, disguised as Germans, seeking to capture her Enigma cipher machine. The film won an Academy Award for sound editing. However, the fictional plot attracted substantial criticism - in reality, it was British sailors from HMS Bulldog in May 1941 who first captured a naval Enigma machine (from U-110) in the North Atlantic, months before the United States had even entered the war. The anger over these inaccuracies reached the British Parliament, where Prime Minister Tony Blair agreed that the film was an "affront" to British sailors.

ToraToraTora

ToraToraTora

Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970) Japanese-American biographical war drama film that dramatizes the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. The film was directed by Richard Fleischer, Toshio Masuda and Kinji Fukasaku and stars an ensemble cast, including Martin Balsam, Joseph Cotten, Sō Yamamura, E. G. Marshall, James Whitmore, and Jason Robards. Tora! Tora! Tora! was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning one for Visual Effects.

TheLongestDay

TheLongestDay

The Longest Day (1962) a film based on Cornelius Ryan's book The Longest Day (1959), about the D-Day landings at Normandy on June 6, 1944, during World War II. The screenplay was by Ryan, with additional material written by Romain Gary, James Jones, David Pursall and Jack Seddon. It was directed by Ken Annakin (British and French exteriors), Andrew Marton (American exteriors), and Bernhard Wicki (German scenes). The Longest Day, which was made in black and white, features a large ensemble cast including John Wayne, Kenneth More, Richard Todd, Robert Mitchum, Richard Burton, Steve Forrest, Sean Connery, Henry Fonda, Red Buttons, Peter Lawford, Eddie Albert, Jeffrey Hunter, Stuart Whitman, Tom Tryon, Rod Steiger, Leo Genn, Gert Fröbe, Irina Demick, Bourvil, Curt Jürgens, George Segal, Robert Wagner, Paul Anka and Arletty. The film was nominated for five Academy Awards and won for Best Cinematography and Best Special Effects

SchindlersList

SchindlersList

Schindler's List (1993) directed and co-produced by Steven Spielberg and scripted by Steven Zaillian. It is based on the novel Schindler's Ark by Australian novelist Thomas Keneally. The film relates a period in the life of Oskar Schindler, an ethnic German businessman, during which he saved the lives of more than a thousand mostly Polish-Jewish refugees from the Holocaust by employing them in his factories during World War II. It stars Liam Neeson as Schindler, Ralph Fiennes as SS officer Amon Göth, and Ben Kingsley as Schindler's Jewish accountant Itzhak Stern. Often listed among the greatest films ever made, it was also a box office success, earning $321.2 million worldwide on a $22 million budget. It was the recipient of seven Academy Awards (out of twelve nominations), including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Original Score. In 2007, the American Film Institute ranked the film 8th on its list of the 100 best American films of all time. The Library of Congress selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry in 2004.

SavingPrivateRyan

SavingPrivateRyan

Saving Private Ryan (1998) set during the Invasion of Normandy in World War II. Directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Robert Rodat, the film is notable for its graphic portrayal of war, and for the intensity of its opening 27 minutes, which includes a depiction of the Omaha Beach assault during the Normandy landings. It follows United States Army Rangers Captain John H. Miller (Tom Hanks) and a squad (Tom Sizemore, Edward Burns, Barry Pepper, Giovanni Ribisi, Vin Diesel, Adam Goldberg, and Jeremy Davies) as they search for a paratrooper, Private First Class James Francis Ryan (Matt Damon), who is the last-surviving brother of four servicemen. The film received widespread critical acclaim from critics and audiences, and was consider a landmark in the war film genre and is considered to be one of the greatest films ever made. The film was nominated for 11 Academy Awards, including Best Picture; and won five, including Best Director, Spielberg's second, The film won four more Oscars; Best Cinematography, Best Film Editing, Best Sound Mixing, and Best Sound Editing. Saving Private Ryan was released on home video in May 1999, earning another $44 million from sales. In 2014, the film was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress, being deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

Platoon

Platoon

Platoon (1986) an anti-war film written and directed by Oliver Stone, starring Tom Berenger, Willem Dafoe, and Charlie Sheen. Stone wrote the screenplay based upon his experiences as a U.S. infantryman in Vietnam, to counter the vision of the war portrayed in John Wayne's The Green Berets. Platoon was the first Hollywood film to be written and directed by a veteran of the Vietnam War. Platoon won the Academy Award for Best Picture of 1986; it also won Best Director for Oliver Stone, as well as Best Sound Mixing and Best Film Editing. In 1998, the American Film Institute placed Platoon at #83 in their "AFI's 100 Years... 100 Movies" poll.

PearlHarbor

PearlHarbor

Pearl Harbor (2001) film directed by Michael Bay, produced by Bay and Jerry Bruckheimer and written by Randall Wallace. It stars Ben Affleck, Kate Beckinsale, Josh Hartnett, Cuba Gooding Jr., Tom Sizemore, Jon Voight, Colm Feore, and Alec Baldwin. The film is loosely based on the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, and the Doolittle Raid. Despite receiving generally negative reviews from critics, the film was a major box office success, earning $59 million in its opening weekend and nearly $450 million worldwide. It was nominated for four Academy Awards, winning in the category of Best Sound Editing. However, it was also nominated for six Golden Raspberry Awards, including Worst Picture. This marked the first occurrence of a Worst Picture-nominated film winning an Academy Award.

HurtLocker

HurtLocker

The Hurt Locker (2008) directed by Kathryn Bigelow and written by Mark Boal . It stars Jeremy Renner, Anthony Mackie, Brian Geraghty, Christian Camargo, Ralph Fiennes, David Morse, and Guy Pearce. The film follows an Iraq War Explosive Ordnance Disposal team who are targeted by insurgents, and shows their psychological reactions to the stress of combat, which is intolerable to some and addictive to others. Boal drew on his experience during embedded access to write the screenplay. The Hurt Locker received widespread acclaim and won six Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Bigelow won the award for Best Director, making it the only film by a female director to win in either category.

HacksawRidge

HacksawRidge

Hacksaw Ridge (2016) directed by Mel Gibson and written by Andrew Knight and Robert Schenkkan, based on the 2004 documentary The Conscientious Objector. The film focuses on the World War II experiences of Desmond Doss, an American pacifist combat medic who was a Seventh-day Adventist, refusing to carry or use a firearm or weapons of any kind. Doss became the first conscientious objector to be awarded the Medal of Honor, for service above and beyond the call of duty during the Battle of Okinawa. Andrew Garfield stars as Doss, with Sam Worthington, Luke Bracey, Teresa Palmer, Hugo Weaving, Rachel Griffiths, and Vince Vaughn in supporting roles. Hacksaw Ridge was chosen by the American Film Institute as one of its top ten Movies of the Year, and has received numerous awards and nominations. The film received six Oscar nominations at the 89th Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor for Garfield and Best Sound Editing, winning the awards for Best Sound Mixing and Best Film Editing.

GunsOfNavarone

GunsOfNavarone

The Guns of Navarone (1961) directed by J. Lee Thompson. The screenplay by producer Carl Foreman was based on Alistair MacLean's 1957 novel The Guns of Navarone, which was inspired by the Battle of Leros during the Dodecanese Campaign of World War II. The film stars Gregory Peck, David Niven and Anthony Quinn, along with Stanley Baker, Irene Papas, Gia Scala, James Darren and Anthony Quayle. The film is about the efforts of an Allied commando unit to destroy a seemingly impregnable German fortress that threatens Allied naval ships in the Aegean Sea. The movie won an Academy Award for Best Special Effects

DirtyDozen

DirtyDozen

The Dirty Dozen (1967) directed by Robert Aldrich, released by MGM, and starring Lee Marvin. The picture was filmed in the United Kingdom and features an ensemble supporting cast including Ernest Borgnine, Charles Bronson, Jim Brown, John Cassavetes, Telly Savalas, Robert Webber, and Donald Sutherland. The film is based on E. M. Nathanson's novel of the same name that was inspired by a real-life group called the "Filthy Thirteen". In 2001, the American Film Institute placed the film at number 65 on their 100 Years... 100 Thrills list. The film was nominated for four Academy Awards, winning in the category Best Sound Effects

BlackHawkDown

BlackHawkDown

Black Hawk Down (2001) directed by Ridley Scott, from a screenplay by Ken Nolan. It is based on the 1999 non-fiction book of the same name by Mark Bowden, which in turn is based on the 29-part series of articles published in The Philadelphia Inquirer, chronicling the events of a 1993 raid in Mogadishu by the U.S. military aimed at capturing faction leader Mohamed Farrah Aidid, and the ensuing firefight, known as the Battle of Mogadishu. The film features a large ensemble cast, including Josh Hartnett, Ewan McGregor, Eric Bana, Tom Sizemore, William Fichtner, Jason Isaacs, Tom Hardy in his feature film debut, and Sam Shepard. Black Hawk Down won two Academy Awards for Best Film Editing and Best Sound Mixing

AmericanSniper

AmericanSniper

American Sniper (2014) directed by Clint Eastwood and written by Jason Hall. It is loosely based on the memoir American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History (2012) by Chris Kyle, with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice. The film follows the life of Kyle, who became the deadliest marksman in U.S. military history with 255 kills from four tours in the Iraq War, 160 of which were officially confirmed by the Department of Defense. The film was produced by Eastwood, Robert Lorenz, Andrew Lazar, Bradley Cooper, and Peter Morgan. It stars Cooper as Kyle and Sienna Miller as his wife Taya, with Luke Grimes, Jake McDorman, Cory Hardrict, Kevin Lacz, Navid Negahban, and Keir O'Donnell in supporting roles. American Sniper received six nominations, including Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Actor for Cooper, winning one award for Best Sound Editing.

AllQuietOnTheWesternFront

AllQuietOnTheWesternFront

All Quiet on the Western Front  (1930) based on the Erich Maria Remarque novel of the same name. Directed by Lewis Milestone, it stars Louis Wolheim, Lew Ayres, John Wray, Arnold Lucy and Ben Alexander. The film was the first to win the Academy Awards for both Outstanding Production and Best Director. All Quiet on the Western Front opened to wide acclaim in the United States. Considered a realistic and harrowing account of warfare in World War I, it made the American Film Institute's first 100 Years...100 Movies list in 1998. A decade later, after the same organization polled over 1,500 workers in the creative community, All Quiet on the Western Front was ranked the seventh-best American epic film. In 1990, the film was selected and preserved by the United States Library of Congress' National Film Registry as being deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

professor900.png

professor900.png

Prof. Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstadt of Linfield College. (Linfield College/YouTube) [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlIE9zpoig0]