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Illustration on the EPA's planned overreach on national watershed lands by LInas Garsys/The Washington Times

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Illustration on militarization of the EPA by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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EPA Jurisdiction of the Clean Water Act Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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Pulling the Plug on the EPA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy speaks during a news conference with U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Lujan (right), on Aug. 13, 2015, along the Animas River Trail in Berg Park in Farmington, N.M. (Jon Austria/The Daily Times via Associated Press) ** FILE **

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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy who has apologized repeatedly for the spill, called the accident "a heartbreaking situation for the EPA," according to the Navajo Times. She met privately Thursday with top tribal officials. (Associated Press)

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An Environmental Protection Agency contractor works on the cleanup in the aftermath of the blowout at the Gold King mine, which triggered a major spill of toxic wastewater, outside Silverton, Colorado. (Associated Press)

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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy said Tuesday she was "deeply sorry" for her agency's wastewater spill from Colorado's Gold King Mine. (Associated Press)

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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy speaks at a Resources for the Future policy leadership forum, Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, in Washington. McCarthy spoke about the EPA’s Clean Power Plan and the recent Colorado mine spill. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) **FILE**

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EPA Power Grab Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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About 1 million gallons of wastewater from Colorado's Gold King Mine began spilling into the Animas River on Wednesday when a cleanup crew supervised by the Environmental Protection Agency accidentally breached a debris dam inside the mine. (Associated Press)

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Illustration on the EPA's anti coal regulations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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The Folly of EPA Claims about Mercury Emissions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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National Edition News cover for July 18, 2015 - States step back from lofty goals on green energy: A half-dozen states have moved to scale back, freeze or eliminate their renewable energy standards in the past year, fueled by concerns over higher energy prices, the impact of the EPA's Clean Power Plan and the growing perception that it's time to take the training wheels off the wind and solar industries. (Associated Press)

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A half-dozen states have moved to scale back, freeze or eliminate their renewable energy standards in the past year, fueled by concerns over higher energy prices, the impact of the EPA's Clean Power Plan and the growing perception that it's time to take the training wheels off the wind and solar industries. (Associated Press)

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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy, disputing energy industry estimates, argues that average Americans ultimately will see lower electric bills as a result of regulations under President Obama's climate change agenda. (Associated Press)

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The Environmental Protection Agency says coal's share of U.S. power generation will drop by nearly 25 percent over the next 15 years if proposed regulations go into effect as scheduled. The final version of the EPA's Clean Power Plan is expected to call for a 30 percent reduction in carbon emissions by 2030. (Associated Press)

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National Edition News cover for June 5, 2015 - EPA backs up water safety from fracking: The oil and gas drilling method known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, mobilizes thousands around the country both for and against the process, industry and some environmental. Hydraulic fracturing to drill for oil and natural gas has not caused widespread harm to drinking water in the United States, the Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday in a draft report. (AP Photo)

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EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy speaks in Washington in this Nov. 19, 2014, file photo. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

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House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton, Michigan Republican, said that it would be best to wait for the resolution of legal challenges to the EPA's Clean Power Act before implementing the plan. (Associated Press)