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FILE - This file photo provided by the Food and Drug Administration shows a side-by-side comparison of the old, left, and new food Nutrition Facts labels. The revamped Nutrition Facts panel that the FDA announced on Tuesday, June 13, 2017, was being delayed, could also change what companies get to count as fiber. The FDA hasn’t yet cleared 26 ingredients that the industry can currently count as fiber to continue being counted as fiber on the new panel. The unsettled details are partly why the industry has called for delaying the deadline to use the new panel. Others say extending the deadline will only lead to confusion. (Food and Drug Administration via AP, File)

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This photo provided by the Food and Drug Administration shows a side-by-side comparison of the old, left, and new food nutrition facts labels. The FDA says it intends to delay a rule that would require food companies to label their products with a revised nutrition facts panel. The agency had previously set a deadline of July 26, 2018, for the new panel, which was intended to make it easier for people to understand how much they’re eating. After hearing feedback from industry and others, the FDA said it would delay the compliance date. (Food and Drug Administration via AP)

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This Oct. 14, 2015, file photo shows the Food and Drug Administration campus in Silver Spring, Md.

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In this Nov. 17, 2015, file photo, Dr. Robert Califf, President Obama's nominee to lead the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Senate has confirmed Califf to be commissioner of the FDA. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

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The panel of Food and Drug Administration advisers voted 18-6 in favor of Sprout Pharmaceutical's daily pill, flibanserin, on the condition that the company develops a plan to manage its risks. (Associated Press)

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This is a screen shot of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) webpage. Pregnant and worried about your medication? The FDA is revamping confusing labels on prescription drugs to make it easier to understand which are safe to use. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding often agonize over whether a drug needed for their own health might hurt their baby, or even if the woman's changing body requires a higher or lower dose. (AP Photo/FDA)

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FILE - In this May 30, 2014 file photo, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg answers questions during an interview at The Associated Press in Washington. While Hamburg acknowledged that opioids are overprescribed, she again emphasized the importance of keeping the drugs accessible to Americans with chronic pain _ a group estimated at about 100 million, or about 40 percent of all U.S. adults (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File)

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House Oversight Committee Chairman Rep. Darrell Issa, California Republican, is concerned that a new Food and Drug Administration rule that would allow generic drug companies to change warning labels without approval has no health benefits, and was designed to placate special interest groups and could increase lawsuits. (Associated Press)

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House Oversight Committee Chairman Rep. Darrell Issa, California Republican, is concerned that a new Food and Drug Administration rule that would allow generic drug companies to change warning labels without approval has no health benefits, and was designed to placate special interest groups and could increase lawsuits. (Associated Press)

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FILE - In this April 11, 2012, file photo, poults raised without the use of antibiotics are seen at David Martin's turkey farm, in Lebanon, Pa. Twenty-five pharmaceutical companies are voluntarily phasing out the use of antibiotics for growth promotion in animals processed for meat, the Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Citing a potential threat to public health, the agency in December 2013 asked 26 companies to voluntarily stop labeling drugs important for treating human infection as acceptable for use in animal production. The FDA did not name the one company that has not agreed to withdraw or revise its drugs. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

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This handout image provide by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) shows, from left, a current food nutrition label, a proposed label and an alternate label. Revamped food nutrition labels would change serving sizes for popular items like ice cream and sodas, make calories listing more prominent, and, for the first time, list any sugars that were added by the manufacturer. The overhaul of the omnipresent 20 year-old label comes as science has shifted. (AP Photo/FDA)

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This undated image provided by the Food and Drug Administration shows the federal agency's new ad campaign featuring yellow teeth to show the costs associated with cigarette smoking. The federal agency said Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014, it is launching a $115 million multimedia education campaign called “The Real Cost” that’s aimed at stopping teenagers from smoking and encouraging them to quit. Advertisements will run in more than 200 markets throughout the U.S. for at least one year beginning Feb. 11. (AP Photo/Food and Drug Administration)

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This undated image provided by the Food and Drug Administration shows the federal agency's new ad campaign featuring wrinkled skin and yellow teeth to show the costs associated with cigarette smoking. The federal agency said Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014, it is launching a $115 million multimedia education campaign called “The Real Cost” that’s aimed at stopping teenagers from smoking and encouraging them to quit. Advertisements will run in more than 200 markets throughout the U.S. for at least one year beginning Feb. 11. (AP Photo/Food and Drug Administration)