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Hector Barajas

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In this Feb. 13, 2017 photo, U.S. Army veteran Hector Barajas, who was deported, poses for a portrait in his office at the Deported Veterans Support House, nicknamed "the bunker" in Tijuana, Mexico. Despite the pain of separation, many deported vets say they wouldn't hesitate to serve again if given the chance. "Where do I sign up?" said Barajas. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

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This Feb. 13, 2017 photo shows the tattoo on the right arm of U.S. veteran Hector Barajas, who was deported, as he sits in his office at the Deported Veterans Support House, nicknamed "the bunker" in Tijuana, Mexico. Barajas, a former paratrooper who was born in Zacatecas state, crossed illegally into the United States at age 7 and served in the Army from 1995 to 2001. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

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In this Feb. 13, 2017 photo, U.S. veteran Hector Barajas, who was deported, works in his office at the Deported Veterans Support House, nicknamed "the bunker" in Tijuana, Mexico. Barajas recalled the first time he was deported in 2004, after spending a year-and-a-half in prison for shooting at a vehicle. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

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In this Feb. 13, 2017 photo, U.S. veteran Hector Barajas, who was deported, adjusts his beret in his office at the Deported Veterans Support House, nicknamed "the bunker," in Tijuana, Mexico. Barajas works putting U.S. veterans in touch with lawyers who help them receive pensions when possible, psychologists to help them overcome trauma and addiction, and job counseling programs. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)