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india_cleaning_the_ganges_20036.jpg

An Indian man jumps over the polythene bags and garbage littered on the banks of the river Ganges in Allahabad, India, Thursday, July 13, 2017. India's main environmental agency has banned the dumping of any kind of waste within 500 meters (yards) of the most polluted parts of the Ganges, a river considered sacred by devout Hindus. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)

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In this April 13, 2017 photo, a local woman helps Elizabeth Brenner, left, a mother from Minnesota, take a dip in the waters of Gangasagar in West Bengal, India, where the Ganges river flows into the ocean. Brenner was on a pilgrimage following the last footsteps of her son who died while studying abroad in India. She believes that part of her son's remains flowed across India through the Ganges river into the Bay of Bengal. (AP Photo/Rishabh R. Jain)

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In this April 15, 2017 photo, River Ganga or the Ganges is seen from a tourist spot in Kolkata, West Bengal, India. Elizabeth Brenner is on a pilgrimage following the last footsteps of her son who was studying abroad in India in 2011. She believes that part of her son's remains flowed across India through the Ganga river into the Bay of Bengal. Hundreds of thousands of American students study abroad each year, but no one can say exactly how many are injured or die. (AP Photo/Rishabh R. Jain)

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In this March 28, 2017 photo, Elizabeth Brenner, right, gazes skywards during her meeting with locals in Lilam village in the mountainous state of Uttarakhand in north India. Brenner's son Thomas Plotkin fell off a hiking trail near the village while on a study abroad trip in 2011. His body was never found. Brenner is on a journey through India tracing the last footsteps of her son and talking to locals who were involved in the rescue efforts more than five-years-ago. (AP Photo/Rishabh R. Jain)

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Participants hold placards during a protest against a spate of violent attacks across the country targeting the country's Muslim minority, in Bangalore, India, Wednesday, June 28, 2017. Thousands of protestors gathered in different cities to decry the silence of India's Hindu right-wing government in the face of the public lynchings and violent attacks on at least a dozen Muslim men and boys since it was voted to power in 2014. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)

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The main entrance of the Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust in Mumbai, India, Thursday, June 29, 2017. Operations at a terminal at India's busiest container port have been stalled by the malicious software that suddenly burst across the world’s computer screens Tuesday, another example of the disruption that continues to be felt globally. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)

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Trucks loaded with containers are lined up outside a terminal at the Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust in Mumbai, India, Thursday, June 29, 2017. Operations at a terminal at India's busiest container port have been stalled by the malicious software that suddenly burst across the world’s computer screens Tuesday, another example of the disruption that continues to be felt globally. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)

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Containers are piled up at a terminal at the Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust in Mumbai, India, Thursday, June 29, 2017. Operations at a terminal at India's busiest container port have been stalled by the malicious software that suddenly burst across the world’s computer screens Tuesday, another example of the disruption that continues to be felt globally. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)

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india_cyberattacks_83597.jpg

Trucks loaded with containers are lined up outside a terminal at the Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust in Mumbai, India, Thursday, June 29, 2017. Operations at a terminal at India's busiest container port have been stalled by the malicious software that suddenly burst across the world’s computer screens Tuesday, another example of the disruption that continues to be felt globally. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)

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Sacred Cow of India Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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Illustration on the next U.S. ambassador to India by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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Sharmila Nicollet, of India, tees off on the fifth hole of the ShopRite LPGA Classic golf tournament Friday, June 2, 2017, in Galloway Township, N.J. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

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Sharmila Nicollet, of India, tees off on the seventh hole of the ShopRite LPGA Classic golf tournament Friday, June 2, 2017, in Galloway Township, N.J. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

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In this photo taken Monday, May 29, 2017, an Indian woman leans on a wall outside a fast food restaurant in New Delhi, India. More than two decades of rapid economic growth has changed Indians’ lifestyles. People eat out more often, and prefer Western-style junk food such as burgers and pizza over traditional lentil and vegetable meals. The changes have brought a sharp rise in obesity, along with lifestyle diseases such as diabetes, even as India still has some of the world’s worst levels of malnourishment and stunted childhood growth due to a paucity of food. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal)

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In this Monday, May 29, 2017 photo, commuters walk past a fast food restaurant in New Delhi, India. More than two decades of rapid economic growth has changed Indians’ lifestyles. People eat out more often, and prefer Western-style junk food such as burgers and pizza over traditional lentil and vegetable meals. The changes have brought a sharp rise in obesity, along with lifestyle diseases such as diabetes, even as India still has some of the world’s worst levels of malnourishment and stunted childhood growth due to a paucity of food. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal)

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In this Wednesday, April 26, 2017 photo, Rohin Sarin, front row right, and his classmates listen to their math teacher inside a classroom in New Delhi, India. Rohin is one of a growing number of Indians with diabetes, with the disease increasingly afflicting children and adolescents in the fast-growing South Asian country. Nearly 30 percent of India’s teenagers are obese, nearly twice the number in 2010, according to health ministry statistics. (AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal)

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In this photo taken Wednesday, April 26, 2017, Rohin Sarin injects insulin into his arm at his house in New Delhi, India. Rohin is one of a growing number of Indians with diabetes, with the disease increasingly afflicting children and adolescents in the fast-growing South Asian country. Nearly 30 percent of India’s teenagers are obese, nearly twice the number in 2010, according to health ministry statistics. (AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal)

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In this photo taken Monday, May 29, 2017, an Indian family enters a fast food restaurant in New Delhi, India. More than two decades of rapid economic growth has changed Indians’ lifestyles. People eat out more often, and prefer Western-style junk food such as burgers and pizza over traditional lentil and vegetable meals. The changes have brought a sharp rise in obesity, along with lifestyle diseases such as diabetes, even as India still has some of the world’s worst levels of malnourishment and stunted childhood growth due to a paucity of food. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal)

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ADDS FIRST NAME OF DR. BISHNOI - In this Dec. 22, 2016 photo, Indian patients, seen from behind a fogged glass, wait for consultation inside the National Fertility and Test Tube Baby Centre in Hisar, India. The packed waiting room at Dr. Anurag Bishnoi’s clinic bears witness to the fact that working-class families across the country are willing to spend their limited savings for a child of their own. The cost of IVF treatment in India is relatively low, even though many families have to pay on their own. At Bishnoi's clinic, one cycle of IVF costs about 110,000 rupees ($1,700), compared to about $12,000 in the U.S. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)

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ADDS FIRST NAME OF DR. BISHNOI - In this Dec. 22, 2016 photo, photographs of Hindu deities are placed on a poster of a doctor holding a baby inside the National Fertility and Test Tube Baby Centre in Hisar, India. The packed waiting room at Dr. Anurag Bishnoi’s clinic bears witness to the fact that working-class families across the country are willing to spend their limited savings for a child of their own. The cost of IVF treatment in India is relatively low, even though many families have to pay on their own. At Bishnoi's clinic, one cycle of IVF costs about 110,000 rupees ($1,700), compared to about $12,000 in the U.S. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)