Nfl - Bio, News, Photos - Washington Times
Skip to content

NFL

Latest Stories

AP_610717091

AP_610717091

Tom Landry is ranked as one of the greatest and most innovative coaches in NFL history, creating many new formations and methods. His 29 consecutive years as the coach of one team are an NFL record, along with his 20 consecutive winning seasons. Landry won two Super Bowl titles (VI, XII), five NFC titles, 13 Divisional titles, and compiled a 270–178–6 record, the third-most wins all-time for an NFL coach. His 20 career playoff victories are the second most of any coach in NFL history. Landry served in the Army Air Forces during World War II where he was assigned to the 860th Bomb Squadron. Landry co-piloted the massive B-17 Flying Fortress Bomber on more than 30 combat missions

AP_17290695792808.jpg

AP_17290695792808.jpg

ESPN commentators broadcast from Nissan Stadium during an NFL football game between the Tennessee Titans and the Indianapolis Colts Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)

AP_17042022415541

AP_17042022415541

Ryan Fitzpatrick quarterback for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers was drafted by the St. Louis Rams in the seventh round of the 2005 NFL Draft and has also played for the Cincinnati Bengals, Buffalo Bills, Tennessee Titans, Houston Texans, and New York Jets. Fitzpatrick played college football at Harvard and was the first quarterback in school history to rush for over 1,000 yards in a career. Fitzpatrick recorded a 48 on the Woderlic test in nine minutes, While his actual score is unknown, he has acknowledged that he left at least one question blank. As the Wonderlic score is the number of correct answers to 50 questions, the best he could have scored would be a 49. To date, Fitzpatrick has the highest Wonderlic Test score ever achieved among NFL quarterbacks.

AP_787516121335

AP_787516121335

Kevin McCarthy, from Frederick, Md., shows his tattoos about the Washington Redskins, during fan appreciation day at NFL football training camp at Redskins Park, Saturday, Aug. 4, 2012, in Ashburn, Va. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

AP_17022773114176

AP_17022773114176

New England Patriots fan Mark Guzik, of Long Island, N.Y., displays a leg tattoo honoring his team while tailgating in the parking lot of Gillette Stadium before the AFC championship NFL football game between the Patriots and the Pittsburgh Steelers, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017, in Foxborough, Mass. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

104_2017_b3-hanson8201.jpg

104_2017_b3-hanson8201.jpg

Illustration on players in the NFL taking a knee for the National Anthem by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Screen Shot 2017-09-27 at 10.11.33 PM.png

Screen Shot 2017-09-27 at 10.11.33 PM.png

In a CNN forum Wednesday called “Patriotism, the Players and the President,” Spike Lee began yelling about former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who began protesting the national anthem last year, not being signed by any NFL team this year.

AP_17269028724006.jpg

AP_17269028724006.jpg

The Dallas Cowboys, led by owner Jerry Jones, center, take a knee prior to the national anthem prior to an NFL football game against the Arizona Cardinals.

AP_101121125880.jpg

AP_101121125880.jpg

Washington Redskins defensive tackle Albert Haynesworth (92) throws souvenirs to the fans as he leaves the field after the Redskins beat the Tennessee Titans 19-16 in overtime during an NFL football game on Sunday, Nov. 21, 2010, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Joe Howell)

AP_871446798700.jpg

AP_871446798700.jpg

Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III (10) talks with teammates Santana Moss (89) and Josh Morgan (15) during a preseason NFL football game against the Indianapolis Colts, Saturday, Aug. 25, 2012, in Landover, Md. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)

AP_848225356213

AP_848225356213

10. Bill Parcells (1983-2006) was an NFL head coach for 19 seasons. He rose to prominence as the head coach of the New York Giants, whom he led to two Super Bowl titles. Parcells later served as the head coach of the New England Patriots, New York Jets, and Dallas Cowboys. Throughout his career, he coached teams that were in a period of decline and turned them into postseason contenders. He is the only coach in NFL history to lead four different teams to the playoffs and three different teams to a conference championship game

AP_17033656071300

AP_17033656071300

8. Tom Landry (1960-1988) ranks as one of the greatest and most innovative coaches in NFL history, creating many new formations and methods. He invented the now popular 43 defense, and the "flex defense" system made famous by the "Doomsday Defense" squads he created during his 29-year tenure with the Dallas Cowboys. His 29 consecutive years as the coach of one team are an NFL record, along with his 20 consecutive winning seasons. Landry won two Super Bowl titles (VI, XII), five NFC titles, 13 Divisional titles, and compiled a 2701786 record, the third-most wins all-time for an NFL coach. His 20 career playoff victories are the second most of any coach in NFL history. He was named the NFL Coach of the Year in 1966 and the NFC Coach of the Year in 1975. His most impressive professional accomplishment is his 20 consecutive winning seasons (19661985), an NFL record that remains unbroken and unchallenged. From 1966 to 1982 Dallas played in 12 NFL or NFC Championship games, a span of 17 years. More impressive is the Cowboys' appearance in 10 NFC Championship games in the 13-year span from 1970 to 1982. Leading the Cowboys to three Super Bowl appearances in four years between 1975 and 1978, and five in nine years between 1970 and 1978, and being on television more than any other NFL team is what spawned the title of "America's Team"

rams_chargers_football_55710.jpg

rams_chargers_football_55710.jpg

Los Angeles Chargers' Rayshawn Jenkins signs autographs during a joint NFL football practice between the Chargers and the Los Angeles Rams, Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017, in Irvine, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

rams_chargers_football_55767.jpg

rams_chargers_football_55767.jpg

Los Angeles Rams cornerback E.J. Gaines, top, and Los Angeles Chargers wide receiver Jamaal Jones scuffle during a joint NFL football practice, Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017, in Irvine, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

rams_chargers_football_25007.jpg

rams_chargers_football_25007.jpg

Los Angeles Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers gestures to his team during a joint NFL football practice with the Los Angeles Rams, Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017, in Irvine, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

rams_chargers_football_85122.jpg

rams_chargers_football_85122.jpg

Los Angeles Chargers defensive end Melvin Ingram, left, pours candy over fans and running back Melvin Gordon during a joint NFL football practice with the Los Angeles Rams, Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017, in Irvine, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

rams_chargers_football_52887.jpg

rams_chargers_football_52887.jpg

One of several scuffles breaks out during a joint NFL football practice between the Los Angeles Rams and the Los Angeles Chargers, Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017, in Irvine, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

rams_chargers_football_98576.jpg

rams_chargers_football_98576.jpg

One of several scuffles breaks out during a joint NFL football practice held by the Los Angeles Rams and the Los Angeles Chargers, Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017, in Irvine, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

texans_panthers_football_56733.jpg

texans_panthers_football_56733.jpg

Carolina Panthers defensive tackle Kawann Short (99) tackles Houston Texans quarterback Tom Savage (3) during the first half of an NFL preseason football game, Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017, in Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/Mike McCarn)

texans_panthers_football_52738.jpg

texans_panthers_football_52738.jpg

Carolina Panthers wide receiver Kelvin Benjamin (13) makes the catch against Houston Texans cornerback Kevin Johnson (30) during the first half of an NFL preseason football game, Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017, in Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/Jason E. Miczek)